Tupac Shakur

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The life of Tupac Shakur was an integrated mix of contradiction and conformity. His life was his art and was a reflection of the world he lived in and the society that shaped it. In his song "Can't C Me", 2Pac tells of the pressure of the streets that he came to live in, "and I ain't stoppin', till i'm well paid, bails paid, now nigga, look what hell made, visions of cops and sirens, niggas open fire, buncha Thug Life niggas on tha rise, until I die".


This art form glorified violence, misogyny, and brutality to foes and hos. To the mainstream media, Gangsta Rap is readily exploited for its commercial value as entertainment or news, but continues to be misused to demonize black males by the patriarchal norms of the culture in which it exists (hooks 1994). Black males have taken Gangsta Rap as a necessary means of male expression. However, hooks contends, "Without a doubt black males, young and old, must be held politically accountable for their sexism" because they are being "... forced to take the "heat" for encouraging, via their music, the hatred of and violence against women that is a central core of patriarchy". Gangsta Rap lives up to the expectations of the norm.
2Pacs love of Gangsta Rap did not spontaneously appear. It was the culmination of his childhood and the experiences he endured as a young man that had been bludgeoned by life as an adult. He was born into a black revolutionary family as the son of two members of the Black Panthers. His parents were never together after 2Pac was born and he lived with his mother and sister for all of his childhood. Their influence can be seen in one of 2Pac's earlier songs called "Brenda's Got a Baby". ...
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