How do you, in the 21st Century, respond to Shakespeares dramatization of Cleopatra?

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The author of this paper tells us about how does he, in the 21st Century, respond to Shakespeare’s dramatisation of Cleopatra?…

Introduction

I believe Shakespeare’s dramatization of Cleopatra does not step to far away from the actual person and leader she was. However, Shakespeare seems to have placed a much larger emphases on her love life; more so than what probably took place in reality. As a matter of fact, Shakespeare presented her to the theatrical audience as more in-depth and humanistic than any other character in the play, “Antony and Cleopatra”. He removed the shears of symbolism enshrouding her in order to express a more evolved character in ways that were much more, “fascinating, complex, dramatic, and human-like” than just the past points of view about her.
Shakespeare gives the audience intrigue and mystery in regards to Cleopatra’s character. His betrayal of how she calculates and monitors others emotions emphasizes the fact that she was a woman whose every action and gesture had an ulterior motive. I believe, through Shakespeare’s depiction, and reading the historical literature as well; there can be confirmation that Cleopatra used those feelings of others to exploit and serve her own needs as she saw fit. One example of this is in Shakespeare’s play in Act I, scene iii when Antony has just learned of his wife’s death.
Cleopatra makes the somewhat sarcastic statement that Antony was not disturbed by his “beloved” wife’s demise and says, “Now I see, I see/In Fulvia’s death how mine receiv’d shall be”. Of course, her words are only meant in an impish type of playfulness but also carry a motive as well. ...
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