Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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The Great Gatsby is a novel written by F. Scott Fitzgerald. This essay explores how desire is evoked by language within the novel. The capitalist Gatsby's desire for materialism is insufficient to satisfy his desire for emotional wealth and this eventually leads to his death.

Introduction

Gatsby seems to be a victim of his desires. He reveals his love for Daisy A Marxist interpretation of The Great Gatsby reveals the failures of the American Dream and the decadence of personal values. (Tyson 66). Gatsby has a false sense of confidence and tries to forcibly buy Daisy with his wealth. Daisy loses her interest and respect upon discovering that Gatsby's position is due to illegal activities. Gatsby fails to win her over from Tom and is framed by him for Myrtle Wilson's death.
The Great Gatsby seems to be a critique of the American Dream by showing the pitfalls of Gatsby but a close analysis of the novel conveys different messages. The narrator, Nick Carraway, writes that; 'Gatsby turned out all right at the end; it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men.' (Fitzgerald 4). Nick does not criticize the Gatsby's achievement of the American Dream. Tom is the critic on the American Dream that spurred Gatsby to acquire wealth in a short period of time. Tom was jealous and insecure about Gatsby wooing Daisy. He is the foul dust that preyed on Gatsby and framed him as a culprit that led George Wilson to murder him. The novel The Great Gatsby is thus in essence a critique on old wealth suppressing new wealth because of its ideologies.
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