Women's Roles in Lord Byron's "Don Juan" Canto I and Jane Austen's "Mansfield Park"

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The story of Don Juan that is famous all over the world is based upon ancient Spanish legend about a handsome man who falls in love with a daughter of the Seville commander, and then seduces her. After their affair becomes known to public, her father challenges him and is killed by Don Juan…

Introduction

"Don Juan" by Byron is one of the most famous retellings of this legend, changed by the poet. The poem by Lord Byron differs much from the original version in plot, characters and narration. Originally the character of Don Juan embodies a physical desire that is independent from any feelings and morality that are inherent to human beings. The character of the legend is cold and heartless, but Byron gives this name to a young loving and dreaming man, who is modest, romantic, nave and honest. He charms the women as his prototype, but Byron's character is involved into the interplay of feelings and he also falls in love and seeks for happiness, Byron's Don Juan is not a heartless seducer. (Cuddy-Keane)
Canto I describes the family of the character and his youth and his first love affair. Don Juan was born in aristocratic family. His mother is educated and experienced woman, and it is she who brings Don Juan up after the early death of his father. She involved him into the world of art and science, but she forbade him learn something that can get him aware of physical love. She also doesn't allow him to read suggestive books, and the author marks that this manner of education was wrong. (Cuddy-Keane)
The story proceeds to the youth of Don Juan and his first affair. ...
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