Tintern Abbey by William Wordsworth

College
Book Report/Review
Book Reports
Pages 4 (1004 words)
Download 0
William Wordsworth uses nature as a key relational element for life. A reading of Tintern Abbey readily demonstrates the poet's framing of his own life, and ours, in terms of the natural beauty that surrounds him. Moreover, it is significant that his characterization of life in this way embraces both the inner person as well as the outer one…

Introduction


For Wordsworth, Nature is a refuge for the spirit. In one of his deepest expressions, found in lines 55-57 of the poem, he speaks to the Wye Valley as though it is more than just a place for respite from modern life; his language is that of a man to his lover. "How oft, in spirit, have I turned to thee; O sylvan Wye!; thou wanderer thro' the woods; How often has my spirit turned to thee!" (Wordsworth, (1916), p. 233). The Wye is not just a landscape where he comes to find peace; it is a wanderer through the woods. It is alive and moving, an animate friend to whom he turns so that his spirit can be refreshed, renewed, and inspired. Thus, at the deepest level of his being, Wordsworth finds Nature waiting there for him.
In contrast to the spirituality of nature, he also finds within it that which is as mundane as the passage of time. As human beings, we are always aware that time marching on. We see the days come and go, we watch the weeks, months, and years as they advance ever forward. Yet, for Wordsworth, even this routine aspect of everyday life is expressed in terms of nature. For him, years are not just years; they are "summers, with the length; Of five long winters!..." (Lines 1-2, p. 233). His life is not the mere accumulation of years; it is the warmth and freedom of summer leavened with the long winter. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Nutting by William Wordsworth
The entire poem, especially the illustration of the child and its experiences, help the poet introduce the readers to the specific characteristics of Romantic language and style. A careful reading of the poem is necessary to find the Romantic elements in it and to relate the poem to the historical facts of the period. Such a reflective reading of the romantic texts in general, and 'Nutting' in…
Historical Approach of Mary Shelley
Many people believe that Mary Shelly's work cannot be considered from historical point of view, but these people overlook the fact that the 18th and 19th centuries are the time of intensive scientific development and industrial revolution. Furthermore, many of their attributes are reflected in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. This essay will argue that it is possible to consider Mary Shelley's…
Percy Shelly and William Wordsworth
The theme of beauty and nature is common in the works produced during the Romantic era; however each author has given their own voice to the description of nature. Even though Wordsworth and Shelly seem to be running on the same theme of nature, Shelly's perspective of nature is quite different to that of Wordsworth. This essay would compare and contrast the ways in which nature is described in…
William Shakespeare
The central concept of Macbeth's long aside in 1.3 is that of equivocation and ambiguity.1 Macbeth speaks in contradictions and paradox, suggesting that the appearance of the weird sisters and the message they bring can be neither good nor bad. The final words of his speech are a masterpiece of equivocation, almost to the point of disrupting all meaning. It may be worth considering that Macbeth is…
Tintern Abbey by William Wordsworth
For Wordsworth, Nature is a refuge for the spirit. In one of his deepest expressions, found in lines 55-57 of the poem, he speaks to the Wye Valley as though it is more than just a place for respite from modern life; his language is that of a man to his lover. "How oft, in spirit, have I turned to thee; O sylvan Wye!; thou wanderer thro' the woods; How often has my spirit turned to thee!"…
Lyrical Ballads
"Kubla Khan" is an elaborate and sensual adventure, it is fantastical and a phonic treat, conjuring amazing, startling images in the mind's eye and enacting this creation through the medium of sybaritic, mesmerising poetry. "Tintern Abbey", on the other hand, written as it is in blank verse, is more austere and more consciously philosophical. Its dominant mode is not that of the image, but of…
An analysis of Nutting by William Wordsworth
As we begin the poem in the general sense, looking at it from nature-oriented perspective, it appears as usual as any other poem written by Wordsworth. His love and care for nature is revealed. Wordsworth's romantic style can be clearly visualised through the young boy's attachment towards nature and to place it in right terms we can call it being 'one' with nature. This is the common element…