The Dark Continent by Mark Mazower

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As a sweeping overview of the most significant events that happened in European history in the 20th century, Mark Mazower's The Dark Continent has made a mark in contextualizing the societal and political triumphs and upheavals that the world has known about the continent that is now.


However, implicating the "dark" perspective on European history can only serve as a motivation for the systematic work and research of what future Europeans have inherited. As evidenced through the circumstantial hypocrisies and even ignorance to numerous bodies rotting in the European soil is to actually justify any similar action in the future and to side with the most radical of Machiavellisms (Vladanovi, 2005).
According to Mazower's thesis, Nazism, Communism and democracy are in no way different as we might think they are. Under the banner of each idea, political superstructures in 20th-century Europe forced to whack away one true and abiding social issue: namely, the proper relationship between the individual and the collective. Of the three, Mazower believes that Communism derived the closest to a satisfactory solution, not only in theory but even in practice.
In the first chapter, Mazower deemed that one of Hitler's unintended achievements was to persuade many Europeans of the attraction of democracy, and Mazower explicitly delved on why this proved more lasting than after the First World War. He argues that an ability to deliver social welfare was important, and that it bonded the populace to democracy tar more than the rhetoric of democrats. ...
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