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William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing - Book Report/Review Example

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Author : powlowskihollie

Summary

Much Ado About Nothing is a play by William Shakespeare. This essay discusses the nature of this play being a comedy. The play's characters change for better or worse. The tragic and comic elements will be discussed and these findings will steer towards a conclusion…

Extract of sample
William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing

He confesses that; 'it must not be denied / but I am a plain-dealing villain.' (Act One, Scene Three). When he hears his servant Borachio tell about Claudio's love for Hero, he resolves to create trouble when he says;
At the end of the same Act One, Scene Three, Don John has changed to become worse than a discontented, 'canker in the hedge' when he is encouraged and supported by his servants Conrad and Borachio. He acts as the comical fool who creates mischief.
It is comical that when the characters wear masks, they take on the spirit of deceit and deny the truth when their identities are correctly guessed upon. (Act Two, Scene One). On the other hand, Claudio, who has been mistaken by Don John for Benedick, lies that he is indeed Benedick and hears the deception that Don Pedro is in love with Hero. It is comical that Claudio, who deceives Don John, is himself deceived by him. This comic interplay is tragic because it sows the seed of discontent between two good friends, Claudio and Don Pedro. Claudio now believes that Don Pedro has betrayed him by wooing Hero for himself. (Act Two, Scene One).
'Like The Taming of the Shrew, Shakespeare's other comedy of intrigue, Much Ado About Nothing, features centrally courtship by New Comedic disguise, proxy, and impersonation. ...
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