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Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own & Orlando - Book Report/Review Example

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Author : richmond69
Book Report/Review
Book Reports
Pages 16 (4016 words)

Summary

This book report tells about the great novelist Virginia Woolf and her A Room of One's Own and Orlando. The author discussed the androgynous quality of the human mind. The main issue which is describes in the book review is the differences and similarities between the men and the women. …

Extract of sample
Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own & Orlando

The book review dwells upon a characteristic of persons of the opposite sex in the novels of Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own and Orlando. The only pattern Mrs. Woolf acknowledges is that of the general flux and flow of life itself, the "eternal renewal, the incessant rise and fall and fall and rise again". Beyond that, for Mrs. Woolf, there is no divine pattern, no ultimate meaning; beyond that, whatever pattern or meaning life seems to have is that which one arbitrarily imposes in defiance of life's fluidity and chaos; and this pattern which the individual creates must be perpetually remade. Orlando has been called "a study in multiple personality, and a protest against the too narrow labeling of anybody"; "a dynamic fantasia on the history of England's spirit" "une histoire raccourcie de la littérature anglaise"; "a learned parable of literary criticism". Ruth Gruber, calling it a satire on criticism, adds that it "seems as much the history of Virginia Woolf's own literary growth as that of Miss Sackville-West or of England. Virginia Woolf appears to trace her poetic development from that of a romantic child to a woman seeking the realities modulated by her sex." All these statements about Orlando can be called true. Nevertheless, there is a dilemma in the novels. Different though the sexes are, they intermix. In every human being a vacillation from one sex to the other takes place, and often it is only the clothes that keep the male or female likeness, while underneath the sex is the very opposite of what it is above. ...
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