A Rose for Emily by William Faulker

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The main story of "A rose for Emily", written by William Faulker, revolves around Emily Grierson. The Griersons believed that they were higher in status than other citizens of the town. Due to this belief Emily never had any real relationship with anyone as her life revolved around this only concept of status…

Introduction

The concept of this story is very broad as it can be analyzed from the story that women are always being watched as to what their next action would be. Furthermore, this story tells about the sufferings that Emily had to go through because of the conservative thinking of her father. This essay would further analyze the story from a feminist point of view and would tell the readers about the sufferings that Emily had to go through because of the conservative thinking that her father had and furthermore would tell how she reacted to her unfair surroundings.
A Rose For Emily portrayed the life of a woman who had gone through difficult phases of life which she had to cope up with. Firstly when her father died, she lost all the support that she had and this made her go into solitude. The town's people felt sorry for her after the death of her father. They were curious about her way of living and they kept a close watch on Emily. After the entry of Homer Borron, the tale of this short story takes a change. This new character is a Yankee who came into town is a worker. Homer Barron and Emily are seen often by the townspeople and this creates another speculation by them. As he enters in the scenario the people of the town get curious about the relationship between her and Emily. They further want to know that if Emily would marry Homer Borron or not. ...
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