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Japan through the looking glass by Alan Macfarlane - Book Report/Review Example

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Masters
Author : aisha19
Book Report/Review
Book Reports
Pages 15 (3765 words)

Summary

In his recent book titled 'Japan Through the Looking Glass', Alan Macfarlane has given an account of his vision of the Japanese culture and civilization as he found during his visit to the country. This book, published in the year of 2008 has already been acclaimed by the readers and also by the critics…

Extract of sample
Japan through the looking glass by Alan Macfarlane

Allan also makes clear his notion about an integrated world. According to him an integrated world is a unique one that appears to constitute a significant shift from the paradigms of modernism of the other countries, avoiding the deeply ingrained binaries between the East and the West.
In his bid to share his experience of his travel to Japan and his attempt to define the Japanese culture as he perceived, Alan Macfarlane, the author seems to be keen on finding the differences between the American culture and the Japanese culture. In a word, Alan has made an effort to conduct a comparative study of the culture and civilization of the United Sates and of Japan. There is no doubt that the author has observed the country and the culture of its people. The comparative study that he did made him comment in this book that "Japan is so interesting because it is an industrial civilization fundamentally different from ours" (Macfarlane, 2008). It is, in fact very natural that the two countries that are located in different parts of the world would have some differences in respect of their culture and civilization, even if it is considered that it is the present age of modernization and globalization.
There is little scope for denial to the fact that most of the countries in the world are being influenced by the American culture. ...
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