An analysis of Nutting by William Wordsworth

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The poem nutting is a brilliant depiction of verse which can be looked at through different dimensions. We can call it as a piece of work that provides the adoration of the poet towards nature in one perspective, on the other, we can see it as a poem reflecting the common life experience of a human being, yet an another view would be, exploring it as a work attacking the lack of proper treatment of nature…

Introduction


As we begin the poem in the general sense, looking at it from nature-oriented perspective, it appears as usual as any other poem written by Wordsworth. His love and care for nature is revealed. Wordsworth's romantic style can be clearly visualised through the young boy's attachment towards nature and to place it in right terms we can call it being 'one' with nature. This is the common element present in many of his poems. Besides the simplicity of language used in this poem, we can also see the resemblance of style. We can very well say that the style used is as similar to his other poems. The unique difference lies in the context of interpretation that makes it a remarkable one.
This poem explores the loss of innocence in human. The poem itself is a journey of a man from childhood to adulthood. In this sense, it is very obvious that there is a loss of innocence. When a child is born it is full of innocence, knowing not what it does, it keeps growing and enjoying the greatest gift of life as a child. As it reaches the starting point of its adulthood, it almost looses much of its innocent quality. At this stage, the child is able to understand the presence of good and evil. ...
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An analysis of Nutting by William Wordsworth
As we begin the poem in the general sense, looking at it from nature-oriented perspective, it appears as usual as any other poem written by Wordsworth. His love and care for nature is revealed. Wordsworth's romantic style can be clearly visualised through the young boy's attachment towards nature and to place it in right terms we can call it being 'one' with nature. This is the common element…