Watch out for Looming Teacher Recruitment Crisis!

Teacher's recruitment crisis is coming to schools. It is caused by the significant students shortage in basic academic classes.

The schools officials shared that around 2,000 training places were left empty in 2014. It is almost impossible to find qualified enough staff.

Chemistry Teacher with Students in ClassThe Department of Education has disapproved the sad statistics: only 32,5 thousand people are expected to begin teacher coaching courses this season. At the same time, the target is 35,000. So, the share is 93%, which is not that critical. So, some people do not believe in the threat of losing a critical amount of teaching labor. However, as for particular subjects, despite the promised tax-free scholarships of up to £25,000, the under-recruitment statistics still takes place.

For instance, such crucial discipline as Engineering gathered hardly 45% of the required amount of teachers. Physics and Chemistry suffer less (67%), while Foreign Languages, Geography, Literature, Biology, Math and IT are doing fine (80-90%).

It was government’s initiative to raise the barriers to entry for the young teachers.

Still, three-quarters of applicants possess a fine degree of 2:1 (it is the highest proportion on the record so far). It means that the overall quality of all new teachers is increasing year on year. The problem is in their quantity.

Some subjects are lagging behind because roughly 65% of Maths and Physics applicants arrive with a high degree. On the other hand, most of them can boast prestigious training certificates.Teacher Pointing at Map of World

As a result, a wave of teacher's shortages may follow. It will lead to a greater gap in education of the country.

It’s time to focus more on secondary subjects different from English Language, Literature, History or Maths. After all, the demand for computer-based classes grow.

The issue might be solved by providing more adequate training places and courses across the entire United Kingdom. The lack of qualified teachers is not critical now, but it may become so tomorrow.

On-the-job teaching courses in schools seems a nice way out. More than 9,000 trainees are already involved into this program. These “School Direct” courses account for more than a third of all postgraduate training. In fact, school-based courses show the highest standards and quality of the educational process. Meanwhile, the control over national teaching supply turns harder.

Shortages in most of the secondary and half of the primary subjects scares both parents and students. To solve this issue, more attention has to be paid to the university’s training system where only the best experts are released every day.