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Constructed subsurface wetlands for storm water management: UK and US - Essay Example

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Masters
Author : lueilwitzike
Essay
Engineering and Construction
Pages 6 (1506 words)

Summary

CONSTRUCTED SUBSURFACE WETLAND AND STORM WATER MANAGEMENT: UK AND US (Author’s name) (Institutional Affiliation) Key Words Water and wastewater management Abstract Constructed wetlands have stretched around the world and are being incorporated into industrial waste management…

Extract of sample
Constructed subsurface wetlands for storm water management: UK and US

It can also be done to improve its conditions so it can hold or sustain future storm without being turned into wetlands. Storm usually causes a lot of property destruction, leaving or turning some areas wetlands with water runoffs. Water is a fundamental part of our daily life; therefore industries should adopt new management scheme to curb pollutants in water. Water industries have ensured such problems are advocated and proper scientific measure employed. Introduction Constructed water wetlands are modern systems devised to remove water runoffs and pollutants into main land through filtering and absorption by vegetation. Wetlands are water logged areas with plants typically adapted to drenched soil conditions. Constructed wetlands store water runoffs temporarily into shallow constructed pools where wetland vegetations can grow and be supported by these conditions (Cappiella & McNeal 2007). There are two main types of constructed water wetlands namely, subsurface gravel wetlands and standard wetlands designed for treating such impurities. It is also used in development sites and makes land available for wildlife habitats. This method is ecologically friendly therefore a lot of industrial firms should opt to use it to treat their industrial waste (Letcher 2007). ...
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