Aboriginal history
2 pages (500 words) , Coursework
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...Aboriginal History This paper is my reflective response to the book ‘Telling the Truth about Aboriginal History’ by Bain Attwood, which contains a heart-wrenching account of the Aborigines. Reading the book made me realize the pain that the Aborigines went through. They not only lost their culture, lives and land, but also had to live with the pain of knowing that somewhere out there their loved ones were alive, except they did not know where1. There are many significant key points that I would consider as crucial because this will have a positive result on the students. A survey was conducted that revealed that 38% of children were taken away from their families. Many families are still... Part...
Aboriginal culture
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Culture Number Question a. Aboriginal Dreaming is not merely a series of mythical stories about ancestral heritage and the forming of earth but encompasses all that is indigenous in relation to knowledge; integral to knowledge and Dreaming is indigenous spirituality. Western science and Aboriginal knowledge are complementary and both provide insight into our world and environment. Just as western science seeks to provide answers to questions pertaining to our past, present and future, so too does Aboriginal knowledge (Dreaming) and one cannot be dismissed in favour of the other, instead the two should interact and work together. The English term Dreaming is more an analogy than... ...
Aboriginal Children
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Children Task Australian Aboriginal is the oldest living culture in the earth. They are living a nomadic life following the seasons and the food. The 19th century was said to be the period of dispossession. The dispossession took place in the first century and a half of European-Aboriginal relations in Australia. This was characterized as the period of dispossession, physical ill treatment, social disruption, population decline, economic exploitation, codified discrimination and cultural devastation. (Gardiner- Garden, 1999). During the dispossession a law was implemented to remove the Aboriginal children (especially girls with light skins) from their parents. The removal... Child Care -...
Aboriginal studies
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Visual Artists Resource Kit - Teacher’s Handbook. Retrieved May 06, 2008, from: http://ab... TEACHER RESOURCES Anon. (08 December 2004) Lesson: My Journey. Retrieved May 06, 2008 http www.multiculturalaustralia.edu.au/lessons/lessondetail.php?lessonDocID=93 A step-by-step lesson for stage four that focuses on range of colours, sizes and textures as well as the variety of placement and varrying techniques. Students view art work and then make their own. Imbedded links are provided to download lesson materials including a worksheet and the art works. Students aim to include subjective narrative and/or cultural observation in their artwork. The level of community involve...
Aboriginal studies
7 pages (1750 words) , Research Paper
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...Aboriginal Studies Compare the environment or social organization of two study areas Southeast and Southwest in relation to the key theme of Religion. Answer the following questions: How are the regions similar? How do they differ? Can you see reasons for this? Introduction In the aboriginal studies, the Americas are separated geographically. As environment is the major differentiator in tribal ways of life, cultural and social features of different natives are similar within each division. South East and South West are two such cultural areas of the 12 geographically divided regions. Natives of the South -- southeast and southwest -- lived somewhat...
Aboriginal native of canada
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal life, focusing on the nature of band governance, land tenure systems to restrictions on Aboriginal cultural practices. It is part of the Canadian federal law handling matters relating to Indian status, bands and Indian reserves. The Indian Act has provided ways to understand the native identity and their way of life. The main purpose of the act was to control and manage the lives of every registered Indians and reserve communities. The Indian Act made it possible for the government to determine the land base for these groups in the form of reserves, and defined... The Indian Act affiliation The Indian Act The Indian Act is a piece of federal legislation that defines all the characteristics of...
Aboriginal Rights (Canada)
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Rights and Freedoms in Canada Introduction Aboriginal rights refer to the rights and privilegesaccorded to the aboriginal people, formerly referred to as the owners of the land in Canada. The aboriginal rights in Canada feature in the Canadian constitution in section 35 of the charter of rights as part of the legal boundary governing the people in Canada (Clark 192). They are separate entity rights in Canada that the aboriginal people have practiced and acclimatized to over time. Historically, the aboriginal rights merely protected the aboriginal people and their status in the society. However, the rights and freedoms accorded to the aboriginal people have taken a new... Facilitator: The...
Aboriginal perspectives and science
9 pages (2250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal perspectives and science The concept of indigenous science is very unfamiliar to most Canadian education systems. The education policies that was developed by the Ontario first nation was to provide a framework that will provide institutions with a strategic policy natural systems context within which Ministry of Education and school boards can work together to improve the academic performance of the non-aboriginal students. As described by Michell, Herman and Yvonne in ``Learning Indigenous science from place`` (pg. 6), ‘Aboriginal perspective of indigenous science is a study of natural system that contributes to a holistic view of the environment and the role of human beings... ...
AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL EDUCATION
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...aboriginal education Theoretical perspectives for concept of positive educational experience for aboriginal communities: Theoretical perspectives for developing positive educational experience of indigenous communities in Australia must integrate all successful strategies experienced in various case studies. The main objective should be the enrichment of learning experience and preparing the students to participate in a more democratic and respectful society. Several management practices for enhancing the student positive self concept must be given preference (FN1). It includes formation of strong instructional groups for meeting the academic... Swarna1 ID 5488 Order # 137585 16 November 2006 Australian...
Child Care Aboriginal Australia
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
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...aboriginal children and children of mixed marriages who were removed from their Aboriginalhomes by the Australian government and taken to white settlements into an attempt to assimilate, or integrate, white and Aboriginal cultures. For the most part, many of these children never saw their parents or relatives again. The "lost generation" has been the subject of most contemporary Aboriginal literature. Most noticeably, Doris Pilkington's Rabbit Proof Fence tells the story of three girls escape from the white society in which they were placed and return to their Aboriginal reservations. "Assimilation" refers to the attempts of white Australian... Terms The term "stolen generation" refers to black...
Housing for Aboriginal Australia
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Australia Introduction Cultural identity of a tribe, a people, a nation or an ethnic group is best expressed through their housing structures. Australia's aboriginals have placed their signature on the canvas of the country's landscape by raising similar structural abodes of their own. These structures express their cultural and ethnic identity (AIAS, 1983). Indigenous communities like the Australia's aboriginals have been engaged in a unique effort of building dwelling structures that display a systematic process of qualitative design paradigms that are sui generis and practically infallible. Analysis Indigenous architecture necessarily identifies with the otherwise... Housing for...
Aboriginal Contributions to Canada
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Contributions to Canada Introduction: In the era prior to the advent of European explorers, the Canadian landscape was inhabited by aboriginals. They belonged to diverse groups such as the Inuit people who inhabited the Arctic areas, the Central Inuit who mostly occupied the western shore areas, the Inuvialuit or the Western Inuit, and the Algonquian groups. The Algonquian people primarily depended on basic activities such as hunting, fishing and trading while those residing along the river banks were known to be agriculturists (Magocsi, 1999). The Canadian indigenous people also known as the First Nations have contributed immensely in various...
Canadian Aboriginal Law
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Law The Canadian Aboriginal law is the customs legislation by aboriginal people upheld in the Canadian Supreme Court. It is a doctrine of Western law that was adopted to disparate the people’s fundamental rights of using and being governed by their own laws. It concerns various issues related to the aboriginal people in Canada by providing specific rights to traditional practices and land. However, the doctrine interprets, controls, and enforces several treaties agreed between the Aboriginal people and the government. This assists in managing and bonding the interaction between the government and the aboriginals. The aboriginal law was adopted from several sources of legislation... Canadian...
Aboriginal Residential Schools
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...ABORIGINAL RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS of the of the This article explains the effects of Aboriginal residential schools on Canadian society and its economy. The establishment and cessation of such schools spanned roughly a period of one century, but it had serious repercussions on the mainstream society as well as Aboriginal peoples. The government of Canada spends a lot to address the issues of unemployment and provide mental and physical health care, but the task is huge and would not be possible without taking more measures to eradicate poverty among the Aboriginal peoples, so that they can also become productive members of...
Modern Aboriginal Literature
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Literature Australian’s modern Aboriginal literature has grown and now receives both national and international attention. This is a big stride given that its usefulness was at once facing relegation from the literature world. The growth of Aboriginal literature is far much reaching effect on social, political, and cultural contexts (Munkelt, 2013). This effect has come of age due to the exceeding popularity of its original works, which have come out to mark an indelible purpose in the literature context. Alexis highlights the literature of Aboriginal resistance, the literature of heroism, triumph, and survival against all odds. In this modern time, Alexis novel Politics... of...
Australian Aboriginal Health Issues
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Health Issues Running Head: COLONISATION & INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN/ ABORIGINAL HEALTH ISSUES Aboriginal Health Issues in APA Style Aboriginal Health Issues 2 Abstract The essay colonisation & indigenous Australian/ Aboriginal health issues are an argument for a primary health care approach for the Indigenous people. Equity, empowerment and intersect oral partnerships are strategic to primary health care. These are the important elements of maintaining health. As health is implanted in the social preconditions of people's lives, the importance in Indigenous health...
Educating Aboriginal Children
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Children Before the 1970s Aboriginal education was not sufficiently important to the Australian education curricular developers. This educational program was not well organized and was neglected by the educationist and the educational system. Keith McConnochie1 brought up the issue of the absence of serious commitment on fundamental issues in Aboriginal education. He contended that educators were strongly predisposed towards assimilationist ends as well as person changing programs (Barcan, A. 1993, 191). Policies before this time failed to effect any change of thinking and Aborigines were still expected to modify their behaviour, language, skills and values so as to fit... Educating...
Australian Aboriginal Art
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...aborigines Very careful touch-ups may be effective if they are undertaken by experts and if the original intrinsic nature of the paintings are fully preserved. There is no question of relocation. Aborigines There should not be any relocation under any circumstances. There is no question of removing the paintings... www.academia-research.com Sumanta Sanyal d: 10/08/07 Assignment ial Answers ial Stakeholder Issue Argument Counter-Argument Own Position Conserving Archaeologists No relocating Original materials and technique unlikely to get reproduced effectively if whole painting was to be removed from present locations Many complex paintings using complex materials and techniques have been successfully re...
Aboriginal Contributions to Canada
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...ABORIGINAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO CANADA Aboriginal Contributions to Canada of Aboriginal Contributions to Canada Introduction Aboriginals have lived in Canada since ages which can further be supported by the fact that the cities that have developed in Canada are less than a hundred years old. However, it has been more than hundred centuries that the aboriginal people have been living in these cities in Canada. Since the time the aboriginals have been living in Canada, they have also been a great source of contribution to the country. They have significantly contributed in the field of agriculture, geography, literature, military, arts, fur trade and medicine. This paper primarily focuses... ?Running Head:...
Presentation " Working with Aboriginal Elders"
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Elders Working with Aboriginal elders is a book written by an called Ellerby. The book describes issues that existed while working with the aboriginal elders. It continues by discussing issues related to understanding of the aboriginal elders and healers. In addition, the book continues to describe the cultural conflicts that existed in the course of working in institutions and the health care agencies. The book is hence a research finding conducted by researchers in Aboriginal land. The study majorly focused on the Aboriginal elders and how research could be carried out on them. The researchers undertook a participatory means of conducting their research and decided... to conduct...
Health Issue of Aboriginal
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Affiliation: The aboriginal are aware of their health issues based on the number of illnesses they have as well as the numerous visits they make to the health centers. They however blame the government and the issue of racism on their predicament and not the fact that majority are uneducated hence are not aware of the best nutritional health and taking health precautions like the rest of the civilized communities. They have continued to isolate themselves from the rest of the population and hence continue to be left behind when changes in health sector are taking place and this explains their predicament (Dudgeon, Milroy & Walker, 2013). The aboriginal people have started... Health Issue of...
Aboriginal youth gangs
7 pages (1750 words) , Term Paper
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...Aboriginal youth gangs Aboriginal Youth Gangs Introduction There has been a significant increase in violent actsbeing committed by aboriginal gangs in many parts of the globe. Data suggest that gangs which are increasingly drawing frustrated youth into its wings are present in parts of East Asia which include China, Taiwan, Mongolia and Vietnam. India, Nepal, Bhutan also has its fair share of youth gangs. The major part of aboriginal youth gangs are however located in Canada. This paper seeks to present an overview of the aboriginal gangs present in Canada, what draws young people to these gangs which are...
Aboriginal Contributions to Canada
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Contributions to Canada Introduction: In the era prior to the advent of European explorers, the Canadian landscape was inhabited by aboriginals. They belonged to diverse groups such as the Inuit people who inhabited the Arctic areas, the Central Inuit who mostly occupied the western shore areas, the Inuvialuit or the Western Inuit, and the Algonquian groups. The Algonquian people primarily depended on basic activities such as hunting, fishing and trading while those residing along the river banks were known to be agriculturists (Magocsi, 1999). The Canadian indigenous people also known as the First Nations have contributed immensely in various...
Aboriginal peiple of canada
2 pages (500 words) , Assignment
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...Aboriginal People of Canada al Affiliation Aboriginal People of Canada The medical practices of Native Americans, ly five different First Nations of North America, reside on the concept of existence of four sacred dimensions of the so called Medicine Wheel. In other words the Medicine Wheel has four directions that are passed during ones life clockwise: East, South, West and North. Therefore, East represents the beginning of physical journey of a human being in this world of a spring of spirit (to honor the gift of life Native Americans usually smoke tobacco); South represents summer and symbolizes youth or the striving to grow in every possible way...
Reading response: Aboriginal voices
2 pages (500 words) , Book Report/Review
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...Aboriginal voices The land upon which the man with no color settles now is our Mother. All life flows from and goes back to the Mother Earth upon which all men have equal claim and stake. Yet the man with no color tends to make boundaries on the land and tends to treat part of Mother Earth as his private chattel. Today that the man with no color is laying stake to Mother Earth, I wonder if tomorrow the man with no color will lay stake to the unending Sky. The way in which the man with no color behaves is as if he has been disowned. He must have Mother Earth where he came from yet he and others like him still come to our part of Mother Earth to lay claim to it and to divide... response: Aboriginal voices ...
Aboriginal Women and Lesbians
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal women and lesbians: Aboriginal women, along with their children, and lesbians have been victims of racism, sexism and domestic abuse in the contemporary Canadian society. This essay compares and contrasts the sufferings of the two groups of women in contemporary Canada, and their resistance against discrimination. Aboriginal women are not given much protection by the law. The number of aboriginal women in prisons is higher than that of men, which shows discrimination against them. When Europeans arrived, aboriginal women were even deprived of their right to vote. European economic and cultural development proved to be catastrophic for them, since they were enjoying equal rights... ?Questions...
Palliative Care for Aboriginal People
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...ABORIGINAL PEOPLE Palliative Care for Aboriginal People Introduction: Palliative care involves providing medical care to patients in a bid to alleviate their pain and suffering and not so much to heal as is with medical treatment. In a standard setting, palliative care commences as soon as a condition is diagnosed, treated and only ends with the cure of the disease or the demise of the individual in question. The core purpose of palliative care is to alleviate physical, psychological and social distress so that improves the quality of life of individuals and their families facing the problems associated with life-limiting illness. In addition, it involves the family... ?Running head: PALLIATIVE CARE FOR...
Aboriginal land rights in Australia
20 pages (5000 words) , Research Proposal
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...aboriginal land rights movements. Contemporary Australia is recently been intimately linked to the accounts of the movement that have formed around the grievances of groups of Aborigines for their traditional land ownership rights, which consequently became the brainchild and emphasis for all the historic injustices that the Australian Aborigines experienced from their white Australian fellow people. Hence, pertaining to the Law Reform Commission Act (1973), which ordered the Commission to examine the pros and cons of applying either in en Toto or in part Aboriginal... traditional law to Aborigines, Diane Bell has boldly expressed it as a sign that there is a drastic...
Economic development in Aboriginal communities
5 pages (1250 words) , Research Paper
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...Aborigines and Economy Introduction For a long time, the Aboriginal community has existed in urban areas. Before colonization, the First Nations in North America formed crowded villages that stood as trade hubs, dwelling regions, and meeting places for major happenings. With the indigenous populace rapidly growing in number, these invariably gave birth to the Aboriginal community. The Aboriginal society still lives in town areas. Enclosed by non-Aboriginal citizens and frequently separated from their societal lifestyles and their lands, the Aboriginal group in urban regions faces grave...
Aboriginal Maternal Health and Outcomes
9 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Maternal Health and Outcomes Introduction This paper is about proposed strategies that can be used to improve antenatal and postnatal care among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and babies. The strategies are based on evidence from research on the causes of poor health outcomes from this group of people. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have high rates of maternal health problems compared to the non-indigenous groups in NSW. They have higher rates of teenage birth, high numbers of women not attending clinic, high rates of perinatal mortality, and high rate of low birth weight. All these are attributed to...
Issue of Children in Aboriginal Community
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY Introduction Canadian Aboriginal societies are well known for the exceptional love and pride for their children. Aboriginal societies consider children the most crucial part of the community. To them children are God given gifts and their culture obligates all people to hold children with intense respect and equality as the primary aspects of their pride. Aboriginal people take it as they key duty to improve and enhance the social, educational, economic and psychological well-being of their children. Aboriginal children exercise full power and liberty in all aspects of their lives, a fact that surprised many of the European colonialists who later construed... ? ISSUE OF CHILDREN IN...
Aboriginal people and the Canadian justice system
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...ABORIGINAL PEOPLE AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM INTRODUCTION The constitution of Canada through the constitutional act 1867 has recognized the existence of aboriginal communities or people and thus has guaranteed them rights in the constitution and in administering justice. Section 35 of the constitution of Canada defines aborigines as 'aboriginal people in Canada include the Indian, Inuit, and metis people of Canada. And further sect 35 sub sec 4 states 'notwithstanding any other provision of this act, the aboriginal and treaty rights referred to in sub section 1 are guaranteed equally to male and female. The Federal government of Canada and the provincial government are committed... Order 162972...
Aboriginal Residential School System in Canada
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Residential School System in Canada The film Education As We See It presents the Canadian education system’s perception on acculturation of the aboriginals. The film depicts events as they were from the 1870s, which marked the Canadian government’s efforts of integration of aboriginal children. The Canadian government collaborated with the Catholic, Presbyterian, Anglican and United churches to isolate Aboriginal children from the influence of their parents and culture and integrate them into mainstream society. Aboriginal Residential School System was seen as appropriate places that would...
Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being
11 pages (2750 words) , Download 2 , Essay
...Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being From scholarly research, Aboriginal means the first known, or the earliest to come into existence. First used in Italy and Greece, it symbolized the native communities and the old residents, not the newcomers and intruders. Several regions of the world have aboriginals like Australia and Canada (Hazlehurst, 1995). Just like other communities, aboriginal has controlled health organizations whose duty is to ensure the delivery of holistic and culturally appropriate health care. Worth noting, aboriginal...
Colonisation & Indigenous Australian/ Aboriginal Health Issues
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Health Issues Running Head: COLONISATION & INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN/ ABORIGINAL HEALTH ISSUES Aboriginal Health Issues in APA Style Aboriginal Health Issues 2 Abstract The essay colonisation & indigenous Australian/ Aboriginal health issues are an argument for a primary health care approach for the Indigenous people. Equity, empowerment and intersect oral partnerships are strategic to primary health care. These are the important elements of maintaining health. As health is implanted in the social preconditions of people’s lives, the importance in Indigenous health care should be imparted to one...
Australian aboriginal perspectives in the classroom
8 pages (2000 words) , Assignment
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...aboriginal perspectives in the room Affiliation Australian Aboriginal Perspectives in the room Historical perspectives The origin of the Aboriginals has not been known although there have been many speculations about their origins. Aboriginal Australians is a named that was given to the inhabitants who had already inhibited the continent by the British before they began colonizing Australia in 1788. In that, until the 1980s the administrative and legal criteria that were used to identify the Aboriginals was race where people were classified according to their visible physical characteristics or ancestors. Racism affected the Aboriginal people so much that if a child was born... to an...
Canada's Missing And Murdered Aboriginal Women
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Women In august 30, the Canadian people mark the annual day of the disappeared. This is the day that the natives remember the people that got lost in the desert. Over the past 30 years, there have been over 600 cases of disappeared women. The disappearance cases are often thought to be a result of extrajudicialkillings and other forms of murder. The spread of the new that such a number of women have disappeared over the years with little government commitment leads to the questioning of the commitment of the government towards the protection of the natives. It also leads to the question of whether the government is discriminative in the approaches... Topic: Canadas Missing And Murdered...
Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Lecturer: The connection between the intellectual and cultural properties of ingenuous people of Australia and other parts of their cultural heritage and self-identity is varied and complex.1 The social economic contribution of the Torres islanders and Aboriginal people to Australia’s heritage has substantially benefited the country, in retrospect these indigenous communities and custodians of the culture have not been equitably recognized of compensated. Centuries before Australia was occupied by the English Impealialists, indigenous Australians were expressing their cultural diversity in an assortment of ways. 2 While many of these are still... ? Australian...
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research task
5 pages (1250 words) , Research Paper
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...Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander People College: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People In the history of Australia, the aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people comprises one of the groups that have suffered severely since the colonial period. During colonization period, the population of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander was estimated at about one million people. The harsh European colonial rule saw the diminishment of this population and by 1920 only 60, 000 members were alive. During the European rule, this category of people was forced to vacate their lands and to abandon their hunter and gatherer way of living. They were forbidden to speak their own language and were... ...
Separate Systems for Aboriginal people in Canada
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal tribes of Canada constitute 3% of the total population but their legal offenders, prosecuted and sentenced, represent more than 20% of thetotal offenders serving their sentence (Statistics Canada, 2005). The statistics are testament to the discriminatory practices and unequal representation of the people who are in minority and have the socio-economic disadvantage that are enjoyed by the majority white population. Several aboriginal groups and state commissions have proposed separate justice system that would be able to better address the needs and requirements of the aboriginals in Canada. We would therefore be discussing the...
History of The Australian Aboriginal People
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal People The term 'aborigines' is believed to be coined from a Latin word that means 'original inhabitants' (Siasoco, 2006), thus Australia's aborigines are the native or indigenous people who lived in the area before the first European invasion in the late eighteenth century. There seems to be no agreement on when the aborigines first settled in Australia, for example, the Columbia Electronic Encyclopaedia has it that the aborigines have been in Australia more than 40,000years, Siasoco (2006), perhaps trying to be more conservative, posit that Aborigines settled in Australia, at least 30,000years ago, while Horton (1994) argue that it cannot be earlier than... History of The Australian...
Three chapters READING quiz (( Aboriginal Treaties )
3 pages (750 words) , Assignment
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...Aboriginal people prior to 1900 5 points) The treaties between natives and non-natives were generally divided into three: commercial compacts, peace/friendship treaties and territorial treaties. Commercial compacts were created in order to facilitate trade between European traders and the aboriginal people. Peace/friendship treaties resulted from the robust trade between the natives and non-natives. Territorial treaties were forged to allow non-natives to operate in the aboriginal land. (Ch. 1, pg. 2) 2. What formal protocols characterized Aboriginal ceremonial practice for establishing kinship relations with their trading partners? (2 points) Formation of kinship ties... What treaties were made with...
Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Lecturer: The connection between the intellectual and cultural properties ofingenuous people of Australia and other parts of their cultural heritage and self-identity is varied and complex.1 The social economic contribution of the Torres islanders and Aboriginal people to Australia’s heritage has substantially benefited the country, in retrospect these indigenous communities and custodians of the culture have not been equitably recognized of compensated. Centuries before Australia was occupied by the English Impealialists, indigenous Australians were expressing their cultural diversity in an assortment of ways. 2 While many of these are still... Australian...
Australian Aboriginal Music and the Didjeridu
14 pages (3500 words) , Research Paper
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...Aboriginal Music and the Didjeridu Aboriginal Music People have close relations with their culture and it is almost unchangeable, especially when it is binding. People respect and adore their culture to greater heights and they maintain a connection with virtually everything that is connected to their culture. This includes cultural practices, of which music is a vital part. Many cultural groups across the globe have to keep their music alive by using their original musical instruments whenever an occasion arises (Atherton 12). This has made it impossible for such cultural groups to develop their Aboriginal musical instruments. These instruments date back to decades and centuries yet... ? Australian...
Canadian Aboriginal Community Assessment and Diagnosis
9 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal communities may have different requirements to achieve a state of health and well...  Community Assessment and Diagnosis Assessment of the health status is an essential pre-requisite for devising suitable healthcare programmes. In this connection there are certain terms which need explanation. According to Stamler and Yiu (2012), an aggregate community is “a group of people with common interests, culture, beliefs, or goals” and the core of the community is people “characterized by their age, sex, socioeconomic status, education level, occupation, ethnicity and religion” (pg. 214). Therefore, community health care providers and health nurses, when examining a community or aggregate for c...
Insight in Australian ancient Aboriginal Rock- Art
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Rock-Art (with reference to Bradshaw paintings) and evaluation of its relevance in a broader context of Aboriginal Art -Prajakta Kanegaonkar Rock Art is the most direct way of studying past human life. It is like a photograph of pre-historic life. It is found all over the world, in every continent. It is not only about survival evolution of Aboriginals, their own spiritual beliefs and lifestyle. Though fundamentally alike, Rock Art everywhere has regional characteristics and flavour. What is Rock-Art? There is no specific definition of Rock-Art. It is further divided into Pictographs and Petroglyphs. Pictographs are the ones, which are applied... in the Arnhem Land, central...
The Current Health Status of Aboriginal Australian Population
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 2 , Essay
...Aboriginal Australian Populations A Report Introduction It is widely known, according to Morrissey (2003), that the “health status of Indigenous Australians is greatly inferior to that of the non-Indigenous population and that this is most clearly demonstrated by their much shorter life expectancy” (as cited in Carpenter & Tait, 2009, 29). Aboriginal Australians, more particularly, endure more infirmities, are more prone to suffer from disability or impairment and poor wellbeing, and, consequently, will die much earlier than non-Aboriginal Australians (Carpenter & Tait, 2009). According to Connor-Fleming and Parker (2001), Aboriginal Australians... ?Running Head: Nursing The Current Health Status of...
Overrepresentation of aboriginal youth in the canadian criminal justice system
5 pages (1250 words) , Thesis
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...Aboriginal Youth in the Canadian Criminal Justice System The overrepresentation of the Aboriginal youths in the Canadian Criminal system has been caused by various factors. These factors vary among the Aboriginal youths living on-reserves and those residing off-reserves. For instance, it is established that Aboriginal youths living on-reserve are characterized by low levels of unemployment. This has led to a relatively higher number of the on-reserve Aboriginal youths engaging in various crimes in an attempt to secure resources for the benefits of their own welfare. Although a large number of the Aboriginal youths depend on social aid, statistics indicate that on-reserve... Overrepresentation of...
Building on Reflective Practice: Becoming real Aboriginal teachers
1 pages (250 words) , Book Report/Review
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...Aboriginal teachers Becoming ‘real’ Aboriginal teachers: attending to intergenerational narrative reverberations and responsibilities The article written by Young, et al. (2010) proffered issues pertinent to the narrated stories on the experiences of six Aboriginal teachers: Brenda, Mary, Jennifer, Jerri-Lynn, Khea, Lucy and Lulu as they pursued higher education in Canada and delved into research work. The intergenerational narrative reverberations were used intermittently throughout the discourse to manifest stories told of each teacher’s experiences that remain part of the cultural, historical, social events that shaped their personal... and professional development. The remarkable comments...
Comparative paper between aboriginal people of canada and palestinian people
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal life. It shows the nature of the anishinaabe governing body, land tenure systems and how the aboriginal cultural practices can be restricted. The main aim of the act was to be in charge of the lives of anishinaabe people and their culture. The Indian Act made the government to be the one deciding on where these people will relocate especially in reserves. The act also has been an important element in controlling the aboriginal affairs in the country... How the Anishinaabe People Lost Their Lands and the Social Issues They Had According to McNab and Ute (50-51), the introduction of the Indian Act in Canada led to anishinaabe people to lose their land. The act has all the details about the...
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