Abusive Relationships
3 pages (750 words) , Assignment
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...Abusive Relationships and Why Women Stay Although it might seem absurd, victims of abuse, specifically women, oftentimes stay with their abuser; even in the face of continual threat or other hardships. Whereas it might be easy for the onlooker to simply say that they should leave the abusive relationship, the psychological factors discourage this and create a situation in which many women feel trapped within these abusive relationships with no discernible way out. As a function of trying to understand why many of these women feel trapped, the following analysis will discuss some of the major reasons that women refer to when giving excuses for providing justification for why they remain... Section/#...
Women in abusive relationships
7 pages (1750 words) , Research Paper
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...abusive relationships Why Do Women Repeatedly Become Involved in Abusive or Destructive Relationships? Introduction Statistics indicate abusive relationships are extensively increasing evidence from the last decade. Researchers claim women are the most affected in abusive relationships because in many instances that entail partner abuse, men tend to be more abusive to women than women to men (Bracken, 2008). Abuse in relationships is of varied forms like, sexual assault, physical violence as well as emotional torment. However, there have been intense debates as to why abusive relationships still exist and why others find it hard to give up on their abusive partners. In many instances... ? Women in...
Qualitive research on women in abusive relationships
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIPS This research focuses on women in abusive relationships in the manner of domestic violence. Such cases are mainly noted in poorly developed relationships that arise from various factors. These factors include mental instability of a spouse, financial in capabilities, past related experiences of a spouse such as child abuse, influence from drug and substance abuse such as excessive alcoholism, criminal related activities by a spouse such as robbery with violence which results in abusive behavior towards the other spouse. These activities are mainly applicable to the male spouse who is mainly looked up to as the head figure thus the provider... ? QUALITATIVE RESEARCH ON WOMEN IN...
The Reasons Why Some People Stay in Abusive Relationships despite the Risks
8 pages (2000 words) , Research Paper
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...Abusive Relationships despite the Risks Introduction Abusive relationships are those that involve or are characterized by inhumane actions perpetrated by one partner against the other. More often than not, women are considered as the major victims of abuse, whereby their male partners expose them to torturous experiences such as beating, denial of basic necessities, such as food and clothing, sexual exploitation and adultery, verbal abuse on the spouse and the children among others. These actions can be referred to as domestic violence, which is a societal dilemma that has its roots in ancient times, when women were not viewed as full-fledged human beings... ? The Reasons Why Some People Stay in Abusive...
Research Proposal On Domestic Violence - Why Do Women Stay In Abusive Marriages
9 pages (2250 words) , Essay
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...abuse as a recurring abusive aggression by either or both of partners who are in a intimate relationship like friendship, family ties, cohabitation, dating or in a marriage. Hampton et al (2006) in their studies lamented that victims of domestic violence are people of all walks of a life and it can be anyone regardless of socioeconomic class, whether rural or urban, male or female, young or old; divorced, single or married. Domestic violence is also not bound by geographical location, ethnic background, race or religion and from the words of Follingstad and Rutledge (1990) it is the single most “unreported epidemic or violence” that can occur to anyone... ?Research Proposal on Domestic Violence: Why Do...
Relationships
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...relationship where one partner is domineered bythe other. Domestic abuse is very common in so many homes. The homes report the various forms that domestic abuse manifests itself. The four broad categories include physical, emotional, sexual and financial abuse. They all work hand in hand at destroying the psychology of the person being abused. There are very many factors that have contributed to the growth of domestic abuse all over the world. They include stressful situations, substance abuse and many psychological disturbances experienced by the abuser. What is clear is that domestic abuse affects both male and females in any... Research Paper There are so many terms that are used to describe the...
Violence in Families
1 pages (250 words) , Assignment
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...abusive marital relationships. One question that has been asked for critical research by scholars is the reasons women either stay or leave an abusive relationship. Research findings and factual evidence which is supported with statistics gives an insight into the diverse reasons that make women cling to their marriages despite frequent battering and emotional abuse by the partners (Zinn, Eitzen & Wells,2011). A critical evaluation of an article Why women stay in abusive... VIOLENCE IN FAMILIES The debate on gender-based violence has been raging across the world and women have felt the brunt of it more than men. There have been significantly high reported and unreported cases of women experiencing...
Compliance gaining strategies & reconciliation in romantic relationships
4 pages (1000 words) , Research Paper
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...Relationships Compliance Gaining Strategies & Reconciliation in Romantic Relationships From researches done all over the world, it has been found out that a majority of women are battered by their partners in the relationships (Knee, 2002). Some opt to keep quiet about it, while others have come out boldly to speak about it. Whichever way, gender violence is a crime and no one should take the laws into one’s own hands and abuse the partner physically. Knee (2002) confirms that there are better ways of addressing problems in relationships than physical assault since the parties involved are mature enough and, thus, a problem that arises can... Compliance Gaining Strategies & Reconciliation in Romantic...
Verbal abuse in relationships
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
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...Abuse in Relationships Verbal abuse is the excessive use of language to undermine a person’s dignity as well as security through humiliation or insults, in an unexpected or repeated manner. Verbal abuse can either occur in relationships between spouses or between a parent and a child. In this paper, I will discuss the various forms of verbal abuse, characteristics of verbal abuse, the effects of verbal abuse on both the adults and children, and steps the abuser can take o recover from verbal abuse. 1. Forms of verbal abuse Verbal abuse can take various forms, they include: foul or demeaning language, threats, hostile volume or tone, sarcasm and intensity of delivery whether quiet or loud... Verbal...
Critically consider two explanations of the maintenance of relationships. (30marks)
6 pages (1500 words) , Coursework
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...relationships with future ones which they will potentially experience. For example, CLA explains the intent of women who want to stay in abusive relationships. Rusbult and Martz (1995, as cited in Sanderson, 2009, p.434) conducted a study on battered women, and found that when women perceived the profitability of their current relationship as high (in the form of children, house, and finances), and future alternatives as uninviting (in the form of homelessness and joblessness), then they opted to stay with the abusive spouses rather than leaving them. Critical Analysis A critical analysis of social... Maintenance of Relationships Introduction Satisfying relationships are an essential part of one’s...
Unit 4 seminar
1 pages (250 words) , Research Paper
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...abusive relationships as their abusers have learnt ways of controlling them. The abused in this case become dependent on the abusers to an extent that they make attempts to leave, but unsuccessfully (Gosselin, 2008). The abusers also use threats on the abused that makes them stuck in their situation. The children are not an exception in the cycle of violence. They suffer in domestic violent relationships as they cannot protect themselves. Gosselin (2008) indicates that children suffer emotional distress; some get depressed while... Unit 4 Seminar Unit 4 Seminar The cycle of violence is one that touches on all persons in the society. The effects of violence cannot be exhausted. Most victims stay in...
Book Review of "treating the abusive partner"
5 pages (1250 words) , Book Report/Review
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...abuse and building relationship skills. The second chapter describing different kinds of abusive behavior undoubtedly adds a lot to the repertoire of any clinician as it comprehensively deals with different forms of abusive behavior and their relevant legal terminology and concepts. It also provides an insight into the relatively new terminology ‘intimate partner violence’ and clearly describes how it is different from other abuses. The book has successfully gone deep into explaining how ‘abuse’ can be more complex in nature than ‘violence’ The book certainly helps in diagnosis of problems as it effectively divides psychological abuse into four... ? Book Review ‘Treating the Abusive Partner- An...
Book Review of "treating the abusive partner"
5 pages (1250 words) , Book Report/Review
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...abuse and building relationship skills. The second chapter describing different kinds of abusive behavior undoubtedly adds a lot to the repertoire of any clinician as it comprehensively deals with different forms of abusive behavior and their relevant legal terminology and concepts. It also provides an insight into the relatively new terminology ‘intimate partner violence’ and clearly describes how it is different from other abuses. The book has successfully gone deep into explaining how ‘abuse’ can be more complex in nature than ‘violence’ The book certainly helps in diagnosis of problems as it effectively divides psychological abuse into four... Book Review ‘Treating the Abusive Partner- An...
"People hit family members because they can."
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...abused his wife because he believed she did not do an adequate job of cleaning the house. While it’s easy to consider that Chet is just a violent person, one must also consider what would occur if Chet had a janitor that did not properly clean his office. In these regards, it seems clear that Chet would not attack the janitor. While Chet’s exact motivations are not easily discernable, Jacobson (1998) indicates that spousal abuse is oftentimes linked to dysfunctional relationship patterns and modes of communication within the household. Markowitz (2000) also... ?Family Abuse Violence is an all-pervasive element of the historical and contemporary world. With the advancement social organization and modern...
Litigation, mediation, arbitration response
2 pages (500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...abusive relationships. However, it is not reasonable to count litigation as the best means to ensure justice in this regard, because litigation usually takes much time and extensive procedures based on the prevailing laws. Moreover, to what extent the attorneys approached would be sensitive to the pain and suffering of victims involved is uncertain. There are situations when cases on abusive relationships are effectively resolved through mediation as well. Admittedly, one of the major advantages of litigation is that it empowers people to come forward to take legal actions against... Responses Responses Responses to the Posts As Dimino (1st post) purports, litigation gives chances to youth get out of...
Relationships
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Relationships Emoional Hardship of Tita and Celie Tita is a female who is very emotional, sensitive, and lovable, who yearned for her lover all her life. She was in love with her neighbor, Pedro in her younger age and longed to be with him all her life. Pedro asked Tita’s hand in marriage but was denied by her mother and instead her mother demanded Tita’s support till her death. Eventually Pedro married Tita’s elder sister which came as a major shock for Tita. She hence was encountered with deep pain and agony .She becomes a victim of negligence and torture from her mother, who hardly understood her desires and feeling as a young lady.Tita’s from then on released all her emotion with cooking...
Why do some survivors of domestic abuse maintain a relationship with their abusive partner?
34 pages (8500 words) , Essay
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...abuse, whether as a victim or a perpetrator, are not affected by these variables. Additionally, research has demonstrated the elimination of personal problems, such as the ones listed above, does not contribute to ending domestic abuse in a relationship. Nevertheless, for the purpose of framing particular studies of domestic abuse, these theoretical approaches are still important. Due to each theorys weakness, it is important for researchers to adopt a theoretically holistic approach. The fact that each case of domestic abuse is somewhat different form another calls for using... Living with abusive partner Contents Introduction 2 Literature Review 3 Hypothesis 6 Methodology 7 Da...
Cycle of Violence
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
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...relationships. The Cycle of Violence was aimed at describing and predicting the pattern that abusive relationships frequently fall into. Walker singled out three phases that these relationships seemed to cycle through (Walker, 2009). The honeymoon phase Violent relationships often begin here. The abuser is passionate, caring, gentle, and charming. The abuser may present his or her victim with gifts, do nice things, and make the victim feel loved... Cycle of Violence The “Cycle of Violence” Theory This is a theory that focuses on domestic violence. Lenore Walker, a researcher andfeminist, first introduced it in the 1970. She based this theory on interviews carried out with women who had survived violent...
Biology
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...Abusive Relationships, Family Planning Services and Features, and Planned Parenthood Services and Features. Each of these topics is discussed in the report as follows. 1. Central Jersey Blood Center: With a vision to provide supply of blood to people in need, the Central Jersey Blood Center has three centers in New Jersey for the donation of blood. The blood that is collected through these centers is primarily meant for use in the area hospitals. The blood donated can be of use to the premature babies, victims of burns... Sur 9 December Biology Introduction: The present study focuses on five topics related to biology that are Central Jersey Blood Center, HIV and AIDS, St. Francis Counseling Center on...
Social work. Domestic violence.
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...abusive behavior that is employed by one partner in a given relationship with the objective of helping the partner to obtain control and power over another intimate partner.Payne & Wermeling (2009, p. 1)point out that for years, most police departments would routinely handle domestic violence cases as family affairs and as such, they would try to avoid becoming involved in these affairs. In recent years, domestic violence has come to be regarded as a rather serious public health problem in the United States. It is quite concerning... of domestic abuse often tend to not freely admit that they are victims of domestic violence perpetrated on them by their female partners. It can...
Attachment Theory and Personality of an Abusive Person
3 pages (750 words) , Term Paper
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...abusive personality in an individual is a result of failure by caregivers to respond to an infant and effectively makes the infant develop resentment against the caregivers and other people since they failed to respond and provide care to them as infants. Effectively, the unresolved resentment develops into hostilities that make the infants develop to abusive individuals. References Dutton, D. G. (2007). The Abusive Personality: Violence And Control in Intimate Relationships (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press. Lenzenweger, M. F., & Clarkin, J. F. (2005). Major Theories of Personality Disorder (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press. Livesley, J. W. (2001). Handbook of Personality... ? Attachment...
Gay and lesbian intimate partner abuse
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Abuse Gay and lesbian intimate partner abuse Domestic violence in both gay and lesbian relationships is an area that has not been of concern by the society. However, cases of violence in same-sex relationships are rising, and are beginning to cause alarm. Bisexual and transgender persons are also prone to abuse from their partners. Many people encounter many types of domestic abuse, and may have difficulties in reporting such cases to the authorities. A study that was carried out in Australia on the frequency of domestic violence in gay or lesbian relationships despite there being limited sources of information. It was, however, hard to determine the rate... violence and other cases where...
The removal of children from their abusive home
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...relationships. These issues often rangefrom alcoholism, drug abuse, domestic violence, child abuse, and such other forms of abuse and violence. This paper shall discuss the removal of children from their abusive homes, and the benefits and the negative impacts of such removal. Discussion There are different ethical issues that may arise when children are taken away from their homes. In some instances, children are brought to welfare and care institutions which are overcrowded and which are often inadequately funded by the state or by private institutions (Wilson, 2006). Many... opportunities to physiologically, emotionally, and mentally develop into normal and well-adjusted children. ...
Cause and effects of going without sleep
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
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...abusive relationships are a major cause of stress, which in turn affects different aspects of an individual’s life including sleep. The recreational use of some drugs and substances also affects the sleeping pattern. For example, caffeine found in coffee and Khat all cause insomnia (Brodsky & Brodsky 67) . In conclusion, the effects of insomnia are also... Causes and Effects of Insomnia Insomnia or the inability to sleep is a condition caused by a multitude of factors that fall under the following categories; psychological, biological or social (Brodsky & Brodsky 7). Discussed below are examples of bio-psycho-social factors that predispose individuals to developing insomnia and its consequences. ...
Developmental Psychology Unit 6
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...abusive relationships, yet many have difficulty leaving their abusive partner. What factors might influence a person to become an abuser? What factors might play a role in the partners decision to stay? What is the next step our society should take in helping women successfully break away from an abusive relationship? There are many factors that may influence a person to be abusive. Personality traits would be the biggest factor – uncontrolled temper, extreme jealousy, and unrealistic expectations in a relationship would... One of the changes our society has undergone in the last several decades is an increased intolerance of family violence. There are more options for women who are involved in...
Domestic Violence
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...abuse used by one person in a relationship to control the other (Domesticviolence, 2009). Domestic violence is an unacceptable social behavior that hurts the couples involved in the act as well as the kids that have to watch their parents fighting all the time. Many times the victims are not willing to speak out against his or her mate because the person fears things will get worse if they speak about it with another person or governmental agency. The purpose of this paper is to analyze domestic violence in our society. Domestic violence influences the high... Our society despite its evolution faces a serious problem called domestic violence. Domestic violence can be defined as physical and emotional...
The Cider ahouse Rules
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...abusive to a degree. These abusive relationships interrupt Homer Wells’ proper psychological development as is evident from further events in the story. The relationship between Dr. Larch (played by Michael Caine) and young Homer needs to be studied in the afore-mentioned context. Despite getting... ?From the film "The Cider House Rules" discuss the following: key lifespan developmental issues, emotional points that had honest realistic behaviour/psychological "statement". Cider House Rules is a 1999 film produced by Richard Gladstein & co. Adapted from a novel of the same name by John Irving, the film garnered both commercial as well as critical success. The movie is of special relevance to American...
Victim Blaming and Victim Defending
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...abusive partners. For instance, for women to be battered there are several cases that are considered. In most cases, this form of victimization may be as a result of drug-abuse or certain relationship factors that come between the couple. In criminal law, there was the introduction of the battered woman syndrome that describes both scenarios (Ryan, 1976). This syndrome was developed in the 70s in order to combat sex-bias in the law of self-defense. According to the law, battered women were excused from their conduct due to their incapacity (Ryan, 1976... of whether they should be blamed or defended. This evidence should also be able to point out that the self-defense mechanism employed is...
Domestic Violence
4 pages (1000 words) , Research Paper
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...relationship on another. Such acts of violence have been taking place within the human race from time immemorial and have come to be viewed in different ways, depending on the values of the societies in which it occurs. While domestic violence has been taking place for a long time, over the last few centuries, such violence has come to be viewed, especially in the Western world, as not only being abusive in nature, but also being illegal. In many western countries, domestic violence is not tolerated by the society and it is seen to be an infringement on the personal rights... of an individual. In other parts of the world; however, it is considered a normal thing with many societies believing...
Domestic violence
4 pages (1000 words) , Research Paper
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...abused people play a crucial role in helping victims come to terms with their situations and also share experiences with others who have undergone similar challenges. However, by virtue of the fact that the members are initially strangers to each other, it is important that he group leader comes up with innovative ways for them to bond with each other so they can form relationships of trust and thus be better placed to share and personal issues. As leader, one may choose from a variety of exercises ranging from touching, movement fantasy or writing, in my group, I would use exercise of touch and compliment and movements. Through touch... ?Domestic Violence Groups for victims of domestic or sexually...
Random q's
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...abusive relationships for years. Furthermore, the criteria for defining BWS, though similar to PTSD differs slightly. It salient characteristics include intimacy and sexual issues, problems with body image and disrupted interpersonal interactions. According to Costanzo et al., children that have been abused tend to be shy and the effect of their abuse and victimization tends to be highly traumatic leading to repressed memories that if not handled well, lead... Psychology Questions al Affiliation) In my opinion, all the 5 levels of expert testimony ultimately aid in shaping the expert’s testimony in determining whether the victim was raped or not. The first stage categorizes the victim’s behavior after...
Intergenerational Trauma and its consequences
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...relationship between the victim and the assailant. Any form of abuse emanating from a close family member who should be a secure source of protection and security causes immeasurable trauma to a child. This causes the child to feel immensely insecure and with time, the child projects vulnerability. Such vulnerability compels the child to develop response mechanisms in order to cope with the surging trauma. Children are likely to trade their well-being with maintaining closeness with the parent despite the trauma faced. Cultural... ? Intergenerational Trauma and its Consequences Intergenerational Trauma and its Consequences Intergenerational trauma is thetype of trauma that transcends from one generation...
Questions for "Tell Them Who I Am" By Elliot Liebow
2 pages (500 words) , Term Paper
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...abusive relationships and parents. The women had poor relationships with their children, husbands, parents, and siblings as they had either ran away from them or even abandoned them for the shelter. However, some were passionate and wished they could go back. 4. Rarely did the women receive help from the men in their lives since they were poor. Some however received help from the men in their lives although it was not sufficient enough to get them out of the shelter... Tell Them Who I Am Life in the shelters was very hard as the women did not have anything constructive to do to earn a decent living. The women woke up in the morning, prepared themselves, took breakfast and went out to their daily...
COPING STRATEGIES
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Relationships Ways Individuals Cope with Violence in Relationships It is amusing that some individuals in abusive and violent relationships can cope and stay in the same violent relationships. It is a fact that violence in relationships continues to be a serious health concern (Ronan, 2004). Violence in relationships may begin in early stages of the relationship with subtle signs of violence and aggression. With time, the aggression levels increase and actual violent attacks such as assault may manifest in the relationship. Individuals in violent relationships may respond to violence in the relationship by using passive or active responses. A woman in a violent relationship may engage... Violence in...
Violence In Premarital Relationships
19 pages (3750 words) , Research Paper
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...relationship, and this may be through psychological warfare or actual physical abuse. Violence in relationships may occur in the form of physical, emotional or sexual abuse, or a combination of all. The violence involves any attempts by one partner to control the other partner in the relationship, initially resulting in conflicts and later developing into actual violence. Incidence of conflict and violence in premarital relationships Literature review Herman (2009) defines violence in premarital relationships as “the perpetration or threat of an act of violence by at least one member of an unmarried couple within the context of dating or courtship, either in same sex or opposite sex... Violence In...
Book review paper
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...abuse. It mainly focuses on why people remain in conditions such as childhood domestic violence. The author uses her life as a case study demonstrating how Kashonia kept her going by her high divine beliefs. The book gives the reader a good understanding of how mental and emotional thinking makes people stay in abusive relationships. The author elucidates an important emotional base that leads people in staying in a psychologically abusive relationship. Dr. Kashonia stated that a person’s heart and the brain were contradictory in decision-making. She... Book review Brainwashed Brainwashed ed by Kashonia Carnegie, is a true story of psychological violence. This story educates us on psychological abuse. ...
Development of Healthy Relationships
3 pages (750 words) , Download 0 , Essay
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...Relationships. Non-healthy relationships Unhealthy relationship involves mean, disrespect, and controlling or abusive behavior. This behavior is normal in some people’s homes because they do not know how to treat each other with kindness and respect as they expect to be treated. This calls for working with a specialized therapist before a person is ready for a relationship... ? Development of Healthy Relationships Healthy Relationships Human beings are naturally social creatures and therefore depriving someone contact with others does not do well in most people. Healthy relationships are important to everyone and take place between individuals and groups. The components of a healthy relationship include...
Domestic violence and criminal theories
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...abusive relationships persist. Psychological theories to domestic violence have highlighted diverse psychopathologies within the perpetrator, inclusive of elements such as self-esteem, antisocial tendencies, the lack of impulse control, and the impacts of substance abuse. This has contributed to blaming on the recipients personal maladjustment, instead... Psychological Theory Explanation to Domestic Violence Conventional approaches to domestic violence can be categorized in psychoanalytic theories; family and systems theories; social theories; feminist theories; and, cognitive behavioral theories. The paper employs attachment theory to investigate domestic violence and seeks to elaborate on why...
Domestic Violence. Effects of Domestic Violence on Women.
11 pages (2750 words) , Essay
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...abuse is increased reporting of psychological symptoms, particularly depression, and low self-esteem in the victims. A case study by Paul (2004) stated that domestic violence victims associated with feelings of helplessness, powerlessness, hopelessness, and the enormous drive that is necessary to change. Aguilar and Nightingale (1994) examined the self-esteem of 48 women via a questionnaire measure, assessing their self-esteem and battering experience in compari­son to a group of 48 non-battered women. Their findings suggested that abuse that is controlling might add to the complexity that some battered women face in ending their abusive relationships... ?Running Head: DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Domestic Violence ...
Women's Crisis Services of Waterloo Region
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...abused intimately or experiencing problems in a domestic relationship. The organization also has the outreach and education services that work closely with the process of transitioning women to independence, and also those seeking assistance from their current abusive situations. The education program functions to provide... Women’s Crisis Services of Waterloo Region Women’s Crisis Services of Waterloo Region Organization is a nonprofit organization in Canada, and it was formed in 1978. It consists of two houses, Haven and Anselma each having thirty and 45 beds respectively. However, these two houses were functioning independently up until 2001 when they merged to form the present Women’s Crisis...
RELATIONSHIPS
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
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...relationship we had with Bruno was considered weird by many people. I would sit on the front porch at night under the stars, stroke his smooth coat and share a lot of stories with Bruno. I knew he would not talk back but the replies were in his soft whining and the look he had in his eyes. When my family went camping, I always insisted on carrying him along instead of leaving him behind. When I... Bruno was dark, with rather intimidating height and brown eyes that hardly smiled. At first sight looking rather withdrawn and cautious around strangers. He never won a lot of friendships because of his occasional temperament but he kept the friends he had close to him. Bruno had “a dog’s loyalty, well, this...
Intimate Partner Violence
11 pages (2750 words) , Term Paper
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...relationship between claim makers. This paper analyzes the use of the constructionist perspective theory in transforming a social condition into a social problem which is IPV. Keywords: IPV (Domestic violence), social constructionist perspective Introduction The number of women being physically abused by their male partners has increased over the years as explained by Barnet, Miller-Perrin and Perrin (2005). The statistics are alarming with most of them sustaining physical injuries or even getting killed. Domestic violence is a prevalent issue globally and measures have been taken to correct this issue (Gordon and Moriarty, 2003). Domestic violence is a...
Prevalent Behavioral Issues in Children Exposed to Domestic Violence
14 pages (3500 words) , Research Paper
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...abuse such as physical, sexual, psychological attacks in relationships, used by one partner to gain or maintain power never another partner (Martin and Ripley, 2010). For a long time now, domestic violence has largely been understood as social problem-affecting women exclusively, but recently, attention has shifted towards its multifaceted impacts on children exposed to it. Domestic violence has become a devastating social problem today because of its vast... ? Prevalent Behavioral Issues in Children Exposed to Domestic Violence Paper I: Prevalent behavioral issues in childrenexposed to domestic violence Introduction Domestic violence refers to patterns of forced and assaultive actions that result to...
Abuse in relationships
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Abuse in Relationships The of family has changed in the last century or so. This is documented by the fact that families have started to segregate and divide due to a number of different reasons. What was supposed to be a well-knitted family in the past is an unknown proposition in the times much like today. There have been a lot of changes in the way the families have come about due to budget issues, socio-economic status, regional segregation norms and even fashion to have a small family. The social influences within the family have lessened and divorce rates have increased. This is because tolerance is missing. Everyone seems to be in a rush within his...
You are to write a 2 to3 page essay describing what elements a multidisciplinary approach addressing the needs of female offenders should contain making sure to
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...abuse or addictions, painful childhood, or abusive relationships before coming up with social learning and behavioral strategies. The therapists and offenders’ characteristic should be matched and they should have regular sessions. Proper treatment should be evaluated by doctors of its consistency, changes and developments. The awareness of physical, emotional and mental health... The fast escalation of female offenders is alarming. Women, just like men, were convicted of both violent and non-violent offenses, from very minor to major, from theft and moral crimes to serious crimes. Women who killed their children, women who involved in drug related offenses, fraud; female sex offenders like the very...
Explain in detail what constitutes effective and appropriate parenting. Address stages of childhood from infancy to young adulthood. Reference Erik Erickson and jean Piagets theories.
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...abusive... May 17, Effective Parenting: |Stage Theories of Erikson and Piaget Erikson’s psychosocial stage theory views development as a sequence of conflicts which must be resolved. Each stage focuses on a particular conflict. If the conflict is inappropriately resolved, then subsequent conflict resolution stages are also at risk (McLeod). It is important for parents to practice parenting skills which support appropriate conflict resolution for each stage. Piaget focuses on cognitive development. The stages he outlines are sequenced ways of organizing active experience (Driskell). Children learn by acting on the environment, so good parenting should support a rich environment with opportunities for act...
FNES, family, love, dating...
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...relationship whether healthy or unhealthy. The main difference between the two types of relationships is that the couple in a healthy relationship work equally. A healthy relationship consists of checks and balances, individuality, equality and compromise. In an abusive relationship, one partner takes the advantage of these goals and uses them against their counterpart to manipulate them into doing whatever they wish. Unhealthy relationships have no compromise, no individuality and have forced inequality. Abusers often use excuses that do not come across as demanding making it hard for the partner to know what they want. This is one tactic... Unhealthy Relationships An unhealthy relationship is a union...
Forgiveness Therapy
5 pages (1250 words) , Article
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...relationships and how their psychological health is impacted. This paper will provide a summary of the article, the writer’s reflection on it and how the writer would apply the learned information to a potential counseling setting. Summary According to Reed and Enright (2006), the negative psychological outcomes of abuse are exhibited by women much longer after the actual abuse from spouses or people they are romantically involved with, and an estimated 35 percent reports such incidents. They opine there is no treatment authenticated by clear tests, despite 72 percent of women in research projects reporting impacts more negative impacts...
Girls like us: Fighting for a World Where Girls Are Not for Sale: A Memoir
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...abusive relationships. Rachel, for instance, is raised in a broken family with an abusive, and domineering male figure who mistreats her; the pimps too, have a history of abusive social relationships and are usually socially disadvantaged. Rachel criticizes societal attitudes and ignorance that leads to stigmatization and labeling of the young girls as ‘prostitutes... Q1 At only thirteen, Rachel Lloyd is entangled in a world full of pain and abuse but she has to struggle for bare survival as a child, alone, with no responsible adults to look after her wellbeing; her vulnerability is evident despite her tenacity, and she falls victim of commercial sexual exploitation. Eventually, with the help of a local ...
Intimate partner violence (domestic violence)
12 pages (3000 words) , Term Paper
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...relationship between claim makers. This paper analyzes the use of the constructionist perspective theory in transforming a social condition into a social problem which is IPV. Keywords: IPV (Domestic violence), social constructionist perspective Introduction The number of women being physically abused by their male partners has increased over the years as explained by Barnet, Miller-Perrin and Perrin (2005). The statistics are alarming with most of them sustaining physical injuries or even getting killed. Domestic violence is a prevalent issue globally and measures have been taken to correct this issue (Gordon and Moriarty, 2003). Domestic violence is a...
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