AIDS Epidemic in Africa
12 pages (3000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS epidemics. Every Saturday, nearby cemeteries are busy with the arrival of people who have died from AIDS. It is said that in South Africa, one of every ten people has AIDS. Some 17 million people in Africa have died representing... Running Head: AIDS IN AFRICA: DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION Aids in Africa: Demographic Transition [The [The of the Institution] Aids in Africa: Demographic Transition Introduction Africa is the worst hit continent in the world by HIV/AIDS. Botswana has 35.8% of it's adult population infected. South Africa comes second with 19.9% infected with HIV. Zimbabwe life expectancy has dropped from 65 to 43 years as a direct result of HIV/AIDS. In Zambia one quarter of the city population...
Politics and the AIDS epidemic
5 pages (1250 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS (Kates, 2004). The disease is a national epidemic with severe effect on specific groups like injection drug users, gay and bisexual men, young individuals and racial and ethnic minorities. Currently, it is also increasingly affecting communities which are economically backward and also women. Since the time AIDS was diagnosed for the first time in the United... ?Politics and AIDS Acquired Immunodeficiency or AIDS is caused by infection with Human immunodeficiency virus or HIV. The first cases of AIDS were reported in 1981. Since then, severe hundreds of thousands of cases have been reported all over the world, including the US. AIDS has contributed to significant mortality and morbidity all over the ...
UNICEF advertisement concerning the AIDS epidemic
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS epidemic. As a means of understanding this advertisement to a more full and complete degree, this particular author will focus upon the rhetorical strategies which are employed throughout; inclusive of ethos, pathos, and logos. It is the hope of this student that the reader will be able to gain a more full and complete/nuanced understanding of the way through which each of these rhetorical strategies are used in the video in question although it is but a brief 45 seconds and overall length, the artists and directors who were responsible for the creation and production... ?The particular video which will be analyzed within this short piece will be that of a 2007 UNICEF advertisement concerning the...
A Case Study on: Patents and the African AIDS Epidemic
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS EPIDEMIC INTRODUCTION AIDS was first reported June 5, 1981, when the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recorded a cluster of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (now still classified as PCP but known to be caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii) in five homosexual men in Los Angeles. (Gottlieb 2006) Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is defined as a set of symptoms and infections resulting from the damage to the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (Wiess 1993). With the alarming number of people affected with AIDS, a specialized drug was developed to contain the syndrome. This is known... drugs - blamed by...
Sizwes test a young mans journey through Africas AIDS epidemic
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS Epidemic The Apartheid government saw the HIV endemic as a challenge in blacks or gays and saw as neither a precedence deserving stern consideration nor action. Yet, during its besieged last days, it remained apathetic. Simultaneously, it was infrequent for black societies to ascribe to the scourge scare to the tormenting of a hated regime. Any attempt to take on the problem of the massive duty of transforming patterns of sexual affiliation was doomed, as it would have to surpass the shame or disgrace of the apartheid regime’s infamous population control scheme, which targeted the black societies (Schneider & Stein 723-31). After political... Sizwe’s Test a Young Man’s Journey through Africa’s AIDS ...
The HIV and AIDS epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa
4 pages (1000 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...epidemic. In this respect, we must put a lot of focus on all segments of population, starting with the hardest hit groups. I expand on these findings in the following narrative. The country is one of the worst hit countries in the world by HIV/AIDS epidemic, with approximately 1.5 million people infected with HIV, and over 2.4 million children are orphans after their parents died of the pandemic. With a population of about 38 million people, the percentage of the total population infected by HIV/AIDS is about 5%. In 2009 alone, the country lost 80,000 people from complications arising from HIV infection (Avert, 2010). About 240 people die daily from the disease and according to OSIPHP... ? Topic:...
The Impact of Homophobia and the HIV/AIDS Epidemic
13 pages (3250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS Epidemic Introduction Viruses have been with us since time immemorial. There is no one yet who can lay claim to having been free from the irritation of the viral common cold. This is something the world has accepted despite that up to now there is no known cure for the common cold virus. But virulent strains of new viral diseases one by one appeared which threatened to annihilate humankind and bring it to extinction. In 1918, the swine flu made its entrance to the world, disappeared, mutated and landed in Russia with a new name H1N1 in 1933 (Schachter 162). It reappeared in 1950 and in 1970...  1 The Impact of Homophobia and the HIV/A...
Sexual behavior since the AIDS Epidemic
9 pages (2250 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aids Pandemic Contraceptive education among college is very important since it enables them to make best choices and avoid unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. United states seem to be larking behind among the developed countries on contraceptive knowledge and use, this call for an effort to educate people on this issue. Many people do not use contraceptives because of misconceptions about contraceptives, negative attitude about contraceptives, failure to recognize the risk of pregnancy, inability to communicate with their partners, disapproval by partners and worry about side effects. Since college students have an understanding of the effects... Sexual Behavior Since the Aids...
Critically assess the role of the UN in the protection of human rights with regards to the AIDS epidemic in subsaharan Africa.
16 pages (4000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS The United Nations Protection of Human Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa With Regard to the AIDS Epidemic Name Class Date Table of Contents The United Nations Protection of Human Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa With Regard to the AIDS Epidemic The AIDS epidemic is the most devastating crisis in the history of human health. More than 35 million people are living with HIV. 22 million men, women and children have died, and 15,000 people are infected every day. If current trends do not change, there will be more than 40 million AIDS orphans in Africa alone by2010. At current infection rates, a fifteen-year-old boy... RUNNING HEAD: UN PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS: AFRICA AND AIDS ...
Aids/HIV epidemic in Swaiziland
7 pages (1750 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS/HIV Epidemic in Swaziland AIDS/HIV Epidemic in Swaziland Introduction Swaziland is world’s biggest HIV/AIDS epidemic center. The current situation poses serious threat to the economic development of the country. The first case of AIDS was reported in 1986 and since then it has spread in all parts of the country. AIDS has virtually devastated the country. In 2009 alone, around 7000 people died from AIDS. The survival of the country is in jeopardy if some drastic steps are not taken. In Swaziland, It is estimated to have approximately...
AIDS is a Worldwild Epidemic
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is a worldwide epidemic that has affected 50 million people since its discovery by the Center for Disease Control (CDC). However, Dr. Robert Gallo, a renowned AIDS researcher was a co discoverer of the virus causing AIDS despite several controversies. He has made several contributions and subsequent AIDS research. AIDS is caused by a virus called HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). The HIV/AIDS virus has remained the leading global threat to health. Governments and international organizations have long been tasked with objectives to end the AIDS pandemic. In fact, there has been so much progress in determining a cure for HIV... Health Sciences and Medicine AIDS ...
AIDS: the most political epidemic of our times
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...epidemic on an infectious disease is not only caused by the infectious agent; it is many a times the resultant of the social, political, economic, and infrastructural failures. One such epidemic is AIDS, which is called the most political epidemic of our times. When AIDS first broke out in USA, the government at that time did almost nothing to contain the disease. The leadership just decided to remain silent and inactive in 1981, and their response to the spreading epidemic was called as "halting and ineffective". With the epidemic spread of the disease, the researchers, epidemiologists, and healthcare professionals were in dire necessity of funds to develop tools... Review Questions A. The...
HIV/AIDS
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS I select two articles for review both of which talk about the prevalence of HIV/AIDS in Africa. HIV/AIDS is a major pandemic that continue to frustrate the efforts by African countries in their quest to attain the MDG 6 goals. HIV/AIDS continue to rage in Africa often sustained by poor cultures and extreme poverty. In the first article HIV/AIDS Epidemic Still Ravaging African Countries by VOA’s Kim Lewis, the author dispels the notion that some of the African countries are winning the war against HIV/AIDS. The article asserts that the pandemic continue to kill millions of Africans on a daily basis. The condition is worse since most victims of the disease use the antiretroviral drug thus...
AIDS
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS leaves an infected person vulnerable to opportunistic infections. Such infections are harmless in healthy people, but in those whose immune systems have been greatly weakened, they can prove fatal. Physicians prefer to use the term AIDS for cases where a person has reached the final, life-threatening stage of HIV infection that leads to death. AIDS is made visible in media representations, its more than just money spent on AIDS, there exists a social, ethical, economic and religious effects. The epidemic has affected the society, touching all peoples... Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) ______________________________________ Introduction Some changes are having a deep and long-lasting...
AIDS
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aids Aids [Institute’s AIDS “AIDS is the abbreviation of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, it is a disease spread by HIV virus” (USDHHS, 2010). The ground reason behind the diagnosis of AIDS for any person is the weakness of ones immune system to fight with HIV infections developed in the body (USDHHS, 2010). The history of AIDS throughout the world is rich enough as to make this syndrome as an epidemic. Though the identification of AIDS for the first time took place in 1980s and since then the epidemic has affected and infected unexampled number of people throughout the globe (Crescent., 2008) (Sutton, 2009). According to UNAIDS estimation at present, there is an approximation... Running Head: Aids...
AIDS
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS) regional summary of the AIDS epidemic is updated regularly from time to time (www.unaids.org). According to their latest published data, in the United States, racial and ethnic minorities are affected disproportionately with the AIDS epidemic with it being the fourth ranked cause of death among African Americans aged 25-44 years. They account for majority of the new cases detected during the last few years although they are just 13% of the total US population. The Hispanics are ranked second in terms of people diagnosed with new cases in the US... Your first and sur Your Due AIDS: Social Implications in the USA AIDS, short for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome is a scourge affecting the worldwide ...
AIDS in Brazil
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS IN BRAZIL RENE DAVILA ENGLISH 302 RON HESS APRIL 17, 2008 AIDS IN BRAZIL The Outbreak of AIDS in Brazil During the 1990'sand How it Got Under Control in 2005-2006 The first case of AIDS in Brazil was recorded back in 1982. (Avert.Org, 2008). Around that time, the country was struggling to get rid of its last military dictatorship and establishing democracy through the efforts of civil society and non-government organizations (NGOs). These civil society groups urged the new democratic government to act quickly and not to ignore the dangers of the AIDS epidemic. So those...
Global health issues(focus on AIDS)
2 pages (500 words) , Literature review
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS and what are countries and organisations doing to combat this problem? The Factors Contributing to the Global Spread of AIDS Mondal and Shitan (2013) reported that the increasing prevalence of HIV/AIDS globally has become a barrier to the progress of human civilization and economic development. Alfsen (2004), Hellandendu (2012) and Coovadia and Hadingham (2005) point out that the factors fueling the growth of the AIDS epidemic include cultural values like traditions and religious beliefs and poverty. However, Hellandendu (2012), like Morrison (2001) and Coovadia and Hadingham (2005) went ahead to propose that the inequality that arises... from poverty, gender and international...
HIV/AIDS
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS Introduction “Most people living with HIV/AIDS are in the economically productive age-group supporting children and elderly relativesand most will receive minimal care when they finally develop the AIDS-related illness. From many aspects, the global HIV/AIDS epidemic is an enormous tragedy for humankind.” (Morison, 2001: pp.7-8) Immunodeficiency is a condition that leaves human beings susceptible to infection by the natural defect of the immune system or by viral infections like AIDS (Leksmono, 2008). Since the 1980s, the human immune system has been facing an unprecedented challenge from the deadly killer - Human Immunodeficiency Virus /Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome...
Evolution of Aids
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...epidemic. Prevention of antiretroviral drug resistance in patients requires at least 90% adherence to HAART (King, 2005). References Barre-Sinoussi, F., J. C. Chermann, F. Rey, M. T. Nugeyre, S. Chamaret, J. Gruest, C. Dauguet, C. Axler-Blin, F. Vezinet-Brun, C. Rouzioux, W. Rozenbaum, and L. Montagnier.. Isolation of a T-lymphotropic retrovirus from a patient at risk for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). 1983. Science 220:868-71 CDC.. Center for Disease Control, 2007 Chermann, J. C., F. Barre-Sinoussi, C. Dauguet, F. Brun-Vezinet, C. Rouzioux, W. Rozenbaum, and L. Montagnier.. Isolation of a new retrovirus in a patient at risk for acquired...
When Faith Meets HIV/AIDS: A Black Church Prevention Approach
6 pages (1500 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS Overview” 14). Because of these alarming figures, the state government of California, as well as many other non-profit organizations, is finding ways to collaborate and to enhance their response to HIV/AIDS. To learn more about the international approach to HIV/AIDS prevention strategies, a brief history of international efforts will be discussed. In 1996, the United Nations Programme on AIDS (UNAIDS) took the helm of leadership in enhancing the global response to the AIDS/HIV epidemic (“HIV/AIDS and Social Justice” 1). The four main principles of the UNAIDS are: “a clear concern for human... 11 October When Faith Meets HIV/AIDS: A Black Church Prevention Approach One of the dominant manifestations ...
HIV/AIDS in Russia
1 pages (250 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...AIDS epidemic. USAIDIRussia. HIV /AIDS Health Profile. Retrieved from /http://www.usaid.gov/ourwork /global_health/ aids/Countries/eande/russia_profile.pdf on Feb 20,2011. WHO/UNAIDS/UNICEF (2010) .Towards universal access: Scaling up priority HIV/AIDS interventions in the health sector.... According to usaid.gov report, HIV in Russia was first detected” among men who have sex with men (MSM) in 1987”. At that time, the incidence was really low until it reached alarming rates at 1996 when more than a thousand cases were added. By 1998, USAID has been active in launching HIV activities that mainly focused on prevention among youth. In 2005, the focus was shifted towards most at risk populations...
United Nations AIDS Conference Simulation
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS Committee is responsible for proposing and negotiating global resolutions in the fight against the HIV and AIDS epidemic (Starkey, Boyer, Wilkenfeld, & Starkey, 2010). Starkey, Boyer, Wilkenfeld, & Starkey further explain that these resolutions are then forwarded to the general assembly for a final vote (2010). Students were assigned different... UNAIDS Simulation Activities and Outcomes Identity Number: Question This simulation activity involved the United Nations GeneralAssemblies. According to Starkey, Boyer, Wilkenfeld, & Starkey (2010), the General Assembly is the deliberative faction of the United Nations and is made up of the United Nations member states each with a vote. The United Nations...
HIV/AIDS
9 pages (2250 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS epidemic. Most of the responsibility of controlling the spread of the virus rests upon the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the governments of the world. Nevertheless, efforts to develop a cure for AIDS have proved to be fruitless. What is the main reason behind this and what is the missing link, that somehow makes medical experts and scientists keep losing the battle against AIDS and prevents them from developing a good treatment for it? An insight into the evolutionary origin of HIV provides answers to the questions about AIDS that have baffled... The Nature of HIV and the Implications of its Evolutionary Origin on Treatment Teacher              ...
Aids and hiv
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS that favored a response once the threat of an HIV epidemic became clear. But it was the determined use of those existing advantages to generate a national response early on that can be credited with the fact that, at the end of the 1990s, Senegal has one of the lowest rates of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa.” (UNAIDS, 1999) The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria was initiated by UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan, in 2001. This fund created to be the largest in size to tackle the diseases on its... ? Role of Governments and the Pharmaceutical Industry in the Fight against HIV/AIDS Muhammad Emaduddin Research-Academia Role of Governments and the Pharmaceutical Industry in the Fight against...
Epidemiology-HIV/AIDS
7 pages (1750 words) , Download 2 , Research Paper
...AIDS” Epidemiology is a study carried out to know the frequency of occurrence of any disease in different groups of population. It aids in evaluating and planning out the approaches to check the disease and describes the integral part of the disease by collecting all the relevant information such as the data collection and its interpretation, various terminologies related with the disease. AIDS is pandemic and encompasses many epidemics of different subtypes. The leading factor for its multiplication and spread include sexual transmission and vertical transmission where the fetus gets the disease from the mother (Kallings, 2008). Even though there is an improvement in the lines... ?...
AIDS identified 1981
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS) as it is today by the CDC in a meeting secondary to its effects on immunosuppression (“History of AIDS”). However, it was found a few years later from discovery that AIDS pose a higher risk to people, whether gay or not, who engage in multiple partners and unprotected sex, who share needles during intravenous drug use, who receive blood transfusions which are not properly screened; also through the breast milk of a breastfeeding mother or even just by giving birth to a child as it spreads through blood-to-blood or any body fluid contact (Miller 53). Authorities before have considered it as an epidemic... Introduction The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), a condition which was first...
Epidemology of HIV/AIDS
13 pages (3250 words) , Download 1 , Research Paper
...AIDS became an epidemic (Berer, 2004). Epidemiology of AIDS and HIV Epidemiology of AIDS and HIV infection took strongholds since this disease seemed very difficult to be conquered despite tremendous advancement of technology, diagnostic measures, and epidemiologic strategies. As Lashley (2006) has pointed out... Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS Introduction Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was isolated in 1983 in a lymphadenopathy patient, and it took up to 1984, to be demonstrated distinctively to be the causative agent of AIDS. In 1981, AIDS was first recognized in the United States (Gallo and Montagnier, 2003). At this time, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported cases of...
Aids and hiv
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS that favored a response once the threat of an HIV epidemic became clear. But it was the determined use of those existing advantages to generate a national response early on that can be credited with the fact that, at the end of the 1990s, Senegal has one of the lowest rates of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa.” (UNAIDS, 1999) The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria was initiated by UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan, in 2001. This fund created to be the largest in size to tackle... Role of Governments and the Pharmaceutical Industry in the Fight against HIV/AIDS Muhammad Emaduddin Research-Academia Role of Governments and the Pharmaceutical Industry in the Fight against HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS inf...
Anglo American
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS epidemic, Anglo-American sought to provide free antiviral therapy to members of its South African workforce who were infected with the HIV/ AIDS. Despite the many positives associated with this decision, Anglo-Americans’ attempt to stem the ramifications of the HIV AIDS epidemic was met with resistance and unsure results. As a result, Anglo-American halted its pilot study. The following explores the reasons for Anglo-Americans decision to halt this landmark study and are they reasonable? What recommendations would an educated reader give Anglo-American with respect to its HIV/AIDS policy? Seem to address these questions and many... 2. Why did the Anglo-American halt its pilot study on the...
HIV/ AIDS international and national health policy
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Research Paper
...AIDS. The Different Policies Related to HIV/AIDS There are international and national health policies established and implemented to resolve the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In the international community, the main leaders in the initiatives related to the disease include the United Nations and other coalition organized by different... Running Head: HIV/AIDS HEALTH POLICIES HIV/AIDS Health Policies in the International and National Context HIV/AIDS Health Policies HIV/AIDS is one of the causes of major concerns in the international community since it had affected a significant number of people throughout the world. In the end of 2001, the 25 million people died because of HIV/AIDS while 40 million were known to...
HIV/ AIDS international and national health policy
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Research Paper
...AIDS. The Different Policies Related to HIV/AIDS There are international and national health policies established and implemented to resolve the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In the international community, the main leaders in the initiatives related to the disease include the United Nations and other coalition organized by different countries... ?Running Head: HIV/AIDS HEALTH POLICIES HIV/AIDS Health Policies in the International and National Context HIV/AIDS Health Policies HIV/AIDS is one of the causes of major concerns in the international community since it had affected a significant number of people throughout the world. In the end of 2001, the 25 million people died because of HIV/AIDS while 40 million were...
HIV/AIDs as related to African Americans
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS, specifically the African American population in the US, various research studies on HIV/AIDS pandemic calls for more care management than what primary care level could give. Although the importance for primary care could not be disregarded, a more advanced and comprehensive methods of care management are needed for this type of illness. The study on global aids epidemic prepared by UNAIDS (2008, 4) stressed that more research should be focused on increasing... HIV/AIDs as related to African Americans AIDS was first reported June 5, 1981, when the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recorded a cluster of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (now still classified as PCP but known to be caused...
Science and the Epidemiology of AIDS
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS epidemic has hit the world hard and fast leaving thousands of young people orphaned in a short space of time. The disease has no cure and presents itself in many forms. Africa, still attached to her mystic past, is one of the hardest hit Continent. Containment of the disease is proving very difficult, hampered by social, cultural and political practices. In many parts of the Continent, people still consider it as being a bewitchment or a death sentence, sentiments brought about initially by the lack of knowledge and then exacerbated by the scare tactics first used by awareness campaigners. To date low income nations are using the effects of the disease as strategies for intervention... ...
Crises and conflict (Fight against HIV/AIDS)
7 pages (1750 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...AIDS epidemic as a whole. On a national level, the stigma associated with HIV can deter governments from taking fast, effective action against the epidemic, whilst on a personal level it can make individuals reluctant to access HIV testing, treatment and care. A study of 1,268 adults in Botswana found that stigmatising attitudes had lessened three years after the national programme providing universal access to treatment was introduced. The study concluded that although improving access to antiretroviral treatment may be a factor in reducing stigma, it does... ?Introduction HIV refers to Human immunodeficiency virus while AIDS stands for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. HIV causes AIDS which is a...
Why is HIV-AIDs so prominent an issue in post-apartheid South Africa? Does religion offer solutions or exacerbate the problems?
16 pages (4000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS in post-apartheid South Africa and argues that rather than offer solutions, traditionalist religion exacerbates the problems. This research study is therefore divided into three main parts. The first part of the paper provides details of the HIV/AIDS crisis in post-apartheid South Africa and analyses why HIV/AIDS has reached epidemic proportions in post-apartheid South Africa. The second part of this research study defines and analyses traditionalist religion in post-apartheid South Africa. The third part of this paper analyses the role of religion, particularly... ?Why is HIV-AIDs so prominent an issue in post-apartheid South Africa? Does religion offer solutions or exacerbate the problems?...
Health / AIDS / pandemics in the region of Latin America
4 pages (1000 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...epidemic can help in creating awareness. The spread of HIV/AIDS is mainly caused by ignorance and lack of proper education; thus, leading to the spread of the disease. This represents an appropriate measure to be used in Latin America since health practitioners can be trained on how to handle the epidemic. Further, public campaigns are essential whereby community-based organizations and NGOs can organize drives to sensitize people on the dangers of the disease. It is also important to avail treatment services at a community level to enable equal access.5 Summary Statistics indicated that by the end of 2012 about 1.5 million... CURRENT SITUATION OF AIDS IN LATIN AMERICA Word Count (1274) History and...
Writter's choice: i thought viral infections like aids or herpes. or even stem cell research. anything that meet the criteria below.
2 pages (500 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS Introduction: This article d May 2003 is d “ Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Prevention: Strategies for Clinicians” written by Tanya Schreibman and Gerald Friedland (AIDS Program, Yale School of Medicine, Yale–New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut). The article is written keeping in view the complexities of HIV that has prevented the discovery a cure against AIDS. In absence of a cure, all that can be done is prevention from the virus. This article highlights the prevention techniques together with appropriate clinical care is the key to prevention from AIDS. This epidemic can be only controlled by prevention, this article throws some light towards... of standardized tools...
AIDS in Africa
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS in humans. There was no other strain of the same kind found in chimpanzees from other parts of the world, so it was concluded that the strain came from Africa. Same source reported an unconfirmed rumor that HIV was brought by an infected individual who travelled through the river from Cameroon to Congo, and spread it through sexual network. As speculated in Avert.org (2011), HIV was carried in the Eastern part of Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Burundi and Rwanda) in 1979 and reached the epidemic level in early 1980s. It was later on established that HIV in West Africa is due to “labor migration, high ratio... Page AIDS in Africa Sociology October 29, TABLE OF CONTENTS l. The problem 3 2. Origin...
AIDS in Africa
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS in humans” (“History of HIV & AIDS in Africa’). There was no other strain of the same kind found in chimpanzees from other parts of the world, so it was concluded that the strain came from Africa. “The History of HIV…” cited an unconfirmed rumor that HIV was brought by an infected individual who travelled through the river from Cameroon to Congo, and spread it through sexual network. It was speculated that HIV was carried in the Eastern part of Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Burundi and Rwanda) in 1979 and reached the epidemic... ESSAY HEALTH PROBLEM: AIDS in Africa Sociology October 29, TABLE OF CONTENTS l. The problem 3 2. Origin of the problem 4 3. Solutions tried 5 4.Why the s...
AIDS and its portrayal on television since 1980s
17 pages (4250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS epidemic. Meanwhile, in many other countries there was an epidemic of fear and prejudice against HIV affected people. AIDS has been estimated to have affected between 46 and 60 million people. The virus can spread through blood, semen, or vaginal fluids. Every minute five new people are infected with HIV. The virus kills young people who are in their formative years (Weiss, 1993). The disease has killed 25 million people since 1981 and, as of today, 3.3 million people die annually. It has been estimated that 68 million people could die of AIDS between 2000 and 2020. Because of the way Africa... ?AIDS and its portrayal on television since the 1980s Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) did not...
How Did AIDS Evolve in Africa?
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...AIDS In the report of the GAO (2001) to the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Joseph A.Christoff, Director for International Affairs and Trade, made the bold prediction that within the next 10 years, one-quarter of the populations of the countries hardest hit by the AIDS epidemic will have died by 2011. “Further, given the scale of the epidemic, AIDS has grown beyond a public health problem to become a humanitarian and developmental crisis… likely to aggravate and in some cases provoke economic decline, social fragmentation, and political destabilization.” Due to its far reaching consequences, the AIDS epidemic has necessitated the concerted and integrated... THE SOCIO-POLITICAL COST OF AIDS ...
Incorporating HIV/Aids programmes into occupational health for the prevention and promotion HIV/Aids in the workplace
27 pages (6750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS epidemic has negative effects especially in the workplace where hundreds of productive employees succumb to the deadly disease every day in different places. Whilst many employees are guided by the traditional legal approach to workplace health and safety which centers on the understanding of employers’ common law of duty care according to which, the employer often has a duty care to the safety of the employee, during the contemporary period; it is increasingly becoming popular that even the employee has a duty to meaningfully contribute to the cause of HIV and AIDS epidemic particularly at the work... ?Africa Centre for HIV/AIDS Management Faculty of Economics and Management Sciences To what extent ...
Patents and the HIV/AIDS Pandemic
13 pages (3250 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS, there are serious concerns regarding the effect of patents of antiretroviral medications which need to be readily accessed. According to Attaran & Gillespie-White (2001, 1886) “patent protection for AIDS drugs - blamed by some activists for restricting access to medication needed in the African AIDS epidemic - actually has little effect on the distribution of the drugs on that continent.” They averred that “there is no apparent correlation between access to antiretroviral treatment, which is uniformly poor across Africa, and patent status, which varies... Running Head: Patents and the HIV/AIDS Pandemic Patents and the HIV/AIDS Pandemic From a Human Service Worker Perspective of the submission...
HIV / AIDS And Global Health
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...AIDS in Africa outnumbered the deaths in all the wars on the continent (Shah, 2009). But the gradually advances in medicine and nursing have led means and ways the spread of HIV/AIDS could be contained. The fact is visible in the data recorded in the most recent Global Report released by UNAIDS earlier this year (UNAIDS, 2013). This research paper aims at defining HIV/AIDS, identifying its origin, how the epidemic has affected people in the entire world, modes transmission, cure and prevention among other issues. Origin of HIV AIDS The first case of AIDS was realized in the USA in 1981... ?HIV AIDS AND GLOBAL HEALTH BERACA FORTUNE Department of ______, ________ For over three decades Human...
Representations of HIV and AIDS in the media
19 pages (4750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS epidemic has been widely interpreted as a challenge to the institutions and the values that typify the achievements of modern Western society: science and medicine, respect for the rights and concern for the welfare of all citizens. So far, the record of our societal and institutional response has been mixed at best, possibly because AIDS came upon us in ways that tested our motives and our institutions. By emerging among groups that are largely despised and rejected, AIDS proved once again the truism that the importance of an event may be determined less by what happened than to whom it happened. The prospect of safer... Running Head: Representations of HIV and AIDS in the media Representations of ...
Aids in Africa: Demographic Transition
16 pages (4000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS epidemics. Every Saturday, nearby cemeteries are busy with the arrival of people who have died from AIDS. It is said that in South Africa, one of every ten people has AIDS. Some 17 million people in Africa have died representing almost 80... Running Head: AIDS IN AFRICA: DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION Aids in Africa: Demographic Transition [The [The of the Aids in Africa: Demographic Transition Introduction Africa is the worst hit continent in the world by HIV/AIDS. Botswana has 35.8% of its adult population infected. South Africa comes second with 19.9% infected with HIV. Zimbabwe life expectancy has dropped from 65 to 43 years as a direct result of HIV/AIDS. In Zambia one quarter of the city population...
HIV/Aids: A Medical Anthropological Approach
9 pages (2250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS or Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. It is one of the most deadly diseases in the world today, and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS estimates that it has already killed more than 25 million people worldwide, while the number of people living with this virus was 39.5 million in 2006. The population of sub-Saharan Africa is one of those in which AIDS has spread about in epidemic proportions. It accounts for 63% of all HIV positive world populace, of which 32% live in southern Africa. The increase in people infected with HIV has grown over the years... HIV/Aids: A Medical Anthropological Approach Order No. 264000 No. of pages: 9 Premium 6530 Introduction The study of human health, in...
On-going Treatment to Reduce HIV/AIDS in South Africa from 2000 to Date
6 pages (1500 words) , Dissertation
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS Chapter 4: Discussion and conclusions from the systematic review Chapter 5 Limitations Conclusions Implications for future research Chapter 6 Plans for dissemination Reflection on learning Appendix 1 CASP assessment tool Appendix 2 Classification of evidence levels References Abstract This systematic review is constructed with a meta-narrative review approach and primarily considers the impact of various interventions that have been employed in tackling the HIV/AIDS epidemic across southern Africa and in South Africa in particular. It considers the various treatment options, most notably ART, and the various Public Health... On-going treatment to reduce HIV/AIDS in South Africa from 2000 to Masters ...
Increasing rate of HIV (see attachment)
2 pages (500 words) , Assignment
Only on StudentShare
...AIDS. SUMMARY. The focused group discussion will mainly aim at reaching outto youth who are within the age bracket of 13-24 years. The age bracket given is considered most sexually active and it is during this time that they are very vulnerable to sexually transmitted infections including the dreaded HIV/AIDS (Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic, 2008). Circumcision has proven to reduce the chances of one getting infected by up to 60% (Denniston et al, 1999). This was from a research conducted in three countries, Kenya, Republic of South Africa and Tanzania between the years 2006-2009. The venue chosen was considered to be private enough to offer a good chance for idea exchange... Increasing rate of...
1 - 50 results of 500 items