Fourth Amendment
4 pages (1000 words) , Download 1 , Research Paper
...Amendment The two basic clauses of the Fourth Amendment of the United s constitution provide that The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated 2. No warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. (Levy 1995, p. 162) The fourth amendment was adopted in response to the tendencies of police officers to abuse their search and seizure responsibilities during the colonial period. The enactment of the fourth amendment guarantees to every citizen “the security... of...
First Amendment
3 pages (750 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...Amendment Protects Free Speech The First Amendment does protect free speech. More precisely, it protects a person’s legal right to express their opinions freely without fear of government intervention. The Constitutional right extends solely to government attempts of suppressing speech not corporations, organizations or individuals. This is a common misconception. Some people think they have the right to say whatever they want to or about whomever they choose without fear of legal retribution. This is not true. The First Amendment defines freedom for the U.S. separating it from many other nations that do not allow free speech but not all speech is protected, an important distinction among... ? The First...
Eight Amendment
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...AMENDMENT goes here] [Your goes here] [Due the paper] Eighth Amendment The eighth amendment was made to the constitution of the United States of America in order to serve three main issues of the criminal justice system. Excessive Bails For the issue of excessive bail, the amendment restricts the judicial discretion in setting bails during the period between arrest and trial for the people accused of criminal and violent activities (Head, n.d.). Excessive Fines For the issue of excessive fines, the amendment limits the amount of fine imposed on a person by the state and federal governments. The reason behind limiting the amount of fines was to facilitate people who are not involved in any... EIGHTH...
15 Amendment
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...Amendment The Fifteenth Amendment of the United s Constitution is centered on the ability for every citizen of the United s to vote regardless of their gender, nationality, race, or religion. When this amendment was first executed in 1870, every government in the United States was prohibited from denying an individual the right to vote based on race, skin color, and previous status of slavery. Since its conception, though, it has been expanded to include other differences found among the human race so that every legal individual has the right to vote. The Fifteenth Amendment has drastically affected minorities across the United States since it was first penned, accepting all individuals... The Fifteenth...
Constitutional Amendment
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...Amendment Immigrants Right To Presidential Office Sections of the Amendment Section A proven citizen of the United States shall qualify for the office of President Section 2. One must live in the States for at least 10 years Section 3. The amendment would go into effect 2 years after its ratification. Amendment Explanation The Article II of the United States defines the requirements a person should have to be eligible for the office of the president. The requirements include a person having to be a natural born United States’ citizen. The person must also have lived in the country for at least 14 years to be qualified as a candidate. He or she must also have the minimum age of 35... Constitutional...
4th amendment
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...AMENDMENT s) s) number and The 4th Amendment A brief explanation of the 4th amendment is that it shields civilians and servicemen from unreasonable seizures and searches. It is explained that, an unreasonable search is a search undertaken by a government officer without a search warrant, a credible cause, or devoid of the authority to conduct it. Seizure, on the other hand, is obtaining possessions for evidentiary use in a court of law (Callahan, McCart and Mueller 2005). The gathering of my phone records and emails is a violation of the amendment, and it amounts to unreasonable search. Why is this so? Scaros (2011) describes the Katz case where such a violation did occur. In the case, Katz...
14th Amendment
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...Amendment and its Application Fourteenth Amendment and its Application The fourteenth amendment clearly s that every person should be considered innocent until and unless he or she is proven guilty in the light of compelling evidence or confession. The usual interpretation argues that a person cannot be identified as a suspect without supporting proof (Magliocca, 2003). Since the amendment is inclined towards protecting the rights of innocents, those who are involved in investigative process of crimes are critical of its implementation. The investigative process involves ethnic and racial profiling of suspects and a high degree of suspicion lies at the base of criminal investigation (Gross... Fourteenth...
Fourth amendment
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...Amendment was enacted to address issues that were very eminent during the colonial America and these issues involved the issuanceof searches without a cause or a warrant of arrest. The Fourth Amendment was meant to safeguard an individual from privacy violations in the form of seizures and searches of their properties. Since its enactment, rules have been made regarding the amendment and the most important rule is the warrant rule. Fourth Amendment History of the Fourth Amendment The Fourth Amendment is a change that was made to the constitution of the United Sates of America and specifically relates to the bill of rights. The origin of the amendment can be traced to the efforts... The Fourth...
8th amendment
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...AMENDMENT CRUEL AND UNUSUAL PUNISHMENT STANDARDS IN DEATH PENALTY CASES SINCE FURMAN V. GEORGIA (1972) Constitutional Law for Criminal Justice Name Institution Date Abstract State legislation or congress describes capital punishment for capital crimes such as murder. The Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty should not be a violation of the eighth amendment on unusual and cruel punishment. The Eighth amendment shapes some procedural aspects based on when a court of law can use the death penalty and how it needs to be conducted. The impact of the Due Process Clause of the 14th amendment has made the application of the 8th amendment against the federal government and those... THE CHANGE IN EIGHTH...
Amendment One
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...Amendment One: Synopsis America has always been, and seen as, a land of liberty, opportunities, rights, and democracy. Freedom, a world that has come to be synonymous with the American nation, is perhaps the most valued clause upheld by authorities all over the nation, be it the Congress or the Court. The founding fathers fought for this value, their speeches being ablaze with hopeful words of liberty and equality. The Declaration of Independence, perhaps the document with the greatest import in constitutional matters, in its opening paragraphs, bolsters people... Harris Kamran Government and Politics 31 January 2008...
First Amendment
3 pages (750 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...amendment and the protection of freedom of speech The first amendment of the United s constitution clearly defines the free speech concept and the corresponding regulations. The Supreme Court is the legal custodian of the first amendment and its proper implementation. Introduction The first amendment grants people the right to free speech and expression without government intervention. It gives them the right to make public opinions, news and information without any meddling from the government. It grants people the right to gather and march in public, demonstrate, protest and carry signs to express their views in a nonviolent way. By the same provision, people can join and associate... The first...
14th Amendment
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...Amendment Introduction The Constitution of the United States of America was enforced on September 17th, 1787. Since then there have been many attempts to reconstruct the rules of governance by amending the written document. According to a report collectively there are nearly twelve thousand attempts and reshaping the constitution. However, only 27 of these proposed changes have been ratified by the states, and are thus being incorporated into the Constitution of America. The first ten amendments in the constitution are collectively dealt as the Bill of Rights, which was designed to curtail the Anti-Federalist sentiments prevailing in the...
First Amendment
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...amendment violated? Was the management decision justified? How can we draw a balance between rights and obligations under the garb of freedom of expression? One’s unpopular speech is other’s free speech. Is disciplining student a right reserved to college faculty? This essay tends to analyze these questions by comparing two essays from Stanley Fish and Stuart Taylor in order to seek a plausible role of first amendment in college campus. Stanley Fish, in his essay “The Free Speech Follies”, argues... ? To my surprise, a friend of mine, Jacob Dominguez, decided to turn up for U.S. History Jacob has always struggled in school due to his unpredictable outbursts and unconventional mode of expression. That day ...
Sixth Amendment
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...amendment of the constitution of the United States of America which advocates for fundamental human rights which they violated in the case of Jose Padilla. Jose Padilla an American citizen born in Brooklyn New York, arrested in connection with the September 11th attack, and accused of collaboration with Al Qaeda and Taliban militias. upon His arrest, they confined Padilla for more than three years without trial on any criminal or civil charges. A ruling in a federal court backed... the president's powers to confine an American citizen without trial for security purposes or when seen as aiding terrorist attacks, on a closer consideration of the sixth amendment the above action...
Sixth Amendment
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...Amendment Sixth Amendment The sixth amendment ensures that a person has the right to fair trial within the shortest time possible. In the pre-trial process, the accused appears before a judge in less than 24 hours. The judiciary then cross-examines the situation to set the date for the case. The government initiates the process by filing a case against a person. Thereafter, the court summons the person for a hearing. According to Smith (2008), the person has the right to defend himself from accusation before trial. At the courts, the person comes face to face with his accuser. After trail, the jury makes the verdict upon which the guilty...
1st Amendment
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...Amendment Insert Insert College First Amendment of the USA constitution Question Yes, there should be a restriction onwhat we are free to state depending on the state of affairs and the receiver of the message in the speech. Freedom of speech represents the American icon and liberation but if its not limited, citizens might misuse it often causing discomfort for others such as insults, lies and bullying. Freedom of speech should be restricted in situations where individuals are protesting for irrelevant concerns, and they are out of bounds at that particular location. Freedom of speech should also be limited in scenarios whereby individuals are inciting each other, or there is hate speech... The First...
Sixth Amendment
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...Amendment The Sixth Amendment to the US Constitution guarantees the right of an accused person to a fair trial within a reasonable time. Each of the factors and processes that compose criminal trials are contained in the Sixth Amendment. These processes contain the right to a jury and public trial, to be “informed of the nature and cause of the accusation”, to be able to confront “witnesses against him”, to be provided with facilities to obtain witnesses and to have the right to legal representation. (US Constitution, Sixth Amendment) The right to a speedy and public trial has two important aims. The right to a speedy trial is calculated to ensure that the accused is not unduly... The Sixth...
Constitutional Amendment
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...Amendment The question has been raised regarding whether or not a constitutional amendment should be passed to allow those not born within the borders of the United States to become President. The argument for such an amendment gained momentum in the 1970’s when then Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, a German born citizen, was widely acknowledged as a good candidate for the high position. Today, because Republican California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has become a popular political figure, the dialogue to amend this portion of the Constitution has again gained impetus among members of both political parties in congress and within the public as well. Though America was built... Constitutional...
Amendment rights
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...AMENDMENT RIGHTS Discussion Board 5 Discussion Board 5Unreasonable searches and seizures are guarded by the United States Constitution under the fourth amendment. This came about due to the controversial writs of assistance during American Revolution. The amendment IV is has two distinct parts whereby: The first part usually safeguards people against unreasonable searches and seizures. There had been numerous ways of remedying unreasonable searches in the ancient times unlike in the modern jurisprudence that has facilitated respect of the amendment by the police officers. The second part usually concerns the proper issue of warrants... Running head: EXCEPTIONS TO THE SEARCH WARRANT REQUIREMENT IN...
5th Amendment
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...Amendment The exclusionary rule is a fifth Amendment’s product that s that no object can be used as evidence in a court of law, if obtained illegally or without a search warrant (David W Neubauer. 2006). The 1921, US Supreme court case of Gouled vs. United States, greatly contributed to the rule as it held that although the Government could seize contraband, it could not seize property to simply use it as evidence. Therefore, police are not supposed to conduct warrantless searches, since such evidence will not be held admissible, unless when something is in plain view, at an airport, during an arrest as well as when there is no time to obtain a warrant. The rule could also be taken... as to...
First amendment
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...Amendment and number) submitted) First Amendment The freedom of expression is a constitutional right as provided by the First Amendment of the US Constitution. The extent of this right has, however, been open to discussion for a long period of time, owing to questions of violations or abuse of this provision. Freedom of expression not only encompasses the rights to freedom of speech and freedom of the press, but also the right to assemble as well as to appeal to the government in case of complaints. The First Amendment, which was implemented in 1791, stated that the congress would not create any law respecting formation of religion, or barring the open exercise thereof; or shortening... the...
The Fourteenth Amendment
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...Amendment College The Fourteenth Amendment The fourteenth amendment was one of the most important constitutional amendments in the United States. The bill sought to eliminate the criminal black codes established by individual states. Notably, the fourteenth amendment endeavored to recognize the rights of emancipated slaves. In many states, slavery was a common factor before 1866. For this reason, the fourteenth amendment sought to introduce a new form of protection of the fundamental rights of former slaves. The whites, specifically in the southern states relied on unfair criminal proceedings to intimidate blacks. For this reason, there were increasing inequalities in criminal... proceedings...
The 17th Amendment
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...Amendment The process of searching for appropriate articles to comply with the requirements of the research begun with actually trying to simply type in the terms ‘17th Amendment’. Using the Chicago Tribune (1849 – 1987), doing so provided as much as 563 results. A quick glance from The New York Times using the same terms generated 1939 results; while the Los Angeles Times revealed 622 results. I tried other terms such as historical timeline and strangely, all publications have zero results. The other terms I used to seek for information on are: history of the 17th amendment, date of ratification, how senators are chosen, and 17th amendment highlights. I tried to search from about seven...  The 17th Ame...
The Second Amendment Paper
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...Amendment The Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is a short one sentence ment that explains citizen’s right to possess armaments. The short and seemingly simple, easy to understand sentence has been the subject of heated debates throughout the nations’ history. The controversial Amendment states, in full, “A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a Free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed” (“The Constitution,” 2008). The Founding Fathers added the Second and the other nine Amendments, collectively called the Bill of rights, to further clarify the rights guaranteed to Americans in the Constitution... ?Anel Villegas English 13 The Second...
First Amendment Rights
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...Amendment of the constitution of United s disallows the creation of rules and regulations that are in the favor of a particular religion and even restricted from creation of laws that are an obstacle in individual’s right to exercise religion, express oneself and stand against the government for the protection of their rights (Alexander, 2005, p.365). On the surface, this Amendment seems to provide a lot of benefits to the American society. For example: media has the freedom to provide information to the citizens of US, and the citizens of US are free to fight for their rights that might be violated by the government through... ? Freedom of Speech/Expression Freedom of Speech/Expression The First...
14 th amendment
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...amendments has become the key factor that looks at the welfare of the people at large. The 14th amendment to the American constitution is highly pertinent because it explicitly addresses immigration and nationality... American constitution is the most flexible constitution of the world with a skeletal framework. Despite being more than 200 years old, the framers had the far sighted vision to provide constitution with ways and means to modify it as per the changing demands of the time. The democratic tenets of American constitution helped to adapt the changing socio-economic paradigms of American society and made it possible to move towards equality and freedom. Ratification of the constitution through...
The Fifteenth Amendment
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...Amendment The Fifteenth Amendment of the United s Constitution is centered on the ability for every citizen of the United s to vote regardless of their gender, nationality, race, or religion. When this amendment was first executed in 1870, every government in the United States was prohibited from denying an individual the right to vote based on race, skin color, and previous status of slavery. Since its conception, though, it has been expanded to include other differences found among the human race so that every legal individual has the right to vote. The Fifteenth Amendment has drastically affected minorities across the United States since it was first penned, accepting all... individuals,...
Equal Rigths Amendment
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...Amendments Paper United s didn’t have any law, whatsoever, to support equality of rights ofall its residents in the Civil Rights Act. This country was under a strong influence of gender discrimination. According to the laws prevailing here, women were not able to own property, vote for their rights, demand their legal wages and were not even able to claim the custody of their own children Men and women working at the same position in an organization were not treated as equals, rather wages for men were supposedly higher than their female coworkers, who weren’t even allowed to sue the organization for this murder of basic human rights. Gender based discrimination could also... ? Topic: Equal Rights...
Australian Marriage Amendment Act
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...Amendment Act Yvonne L. Academia Research The 40 year old Marriage Act 1961 is no longer reflective of contemporary relationships and not reflective of modern Australia's advancement. However, to protect that sanctity of marriage and in effect the family as the basic unit of the society, the government has provided amendments to the old act in order to adapt to the modern views of marriage while working towards its preservation. In light of the prevailing issues on marital break-ups and de-facto relationships, this paper shall discuss the focal point of these new laws in relation to the issues. Introduction The marriage institution as a socially sanctioned union... Australian Marriage...
Fifth Amendment: Self-Incrimination
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...Amendment: Self-Incrimination affiliation Fifth Amendment: Self-Incrimination Self-incrimination is the action of accusing oneself in an unlawful event or exposing oneself to unlawful trial. Self-incrimination happens voluntarily or as a result of questioning. Moreover, the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution defends individuals from being obliged to implicate oneself. This right is entrenched in the refusal of Puritans’ to work together with interrogators in the seventeenth century England. They were frequently tortured or coerced into admitting their religious associations, and if one remains silent, then he is assumed as guilty. This idea of self-incrimination was brought... Fifth...
Topic: The 2nd Amendment
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...amendment Introduction Following the 20th century, the second amendment of the United s constitution became an important issue in the existing public debates. The change in the United States constitution was mainly associated with the increasing worries over the violence and the function of weapons play in that violence. As a result, gun authority advocates started interpreting the second amendment in a single way (Crooker 62). On the contrary, weapons supporters viewed the assaults on the weapons ownership as assaults on liberties, and secured their reading of the second amendment just as aggressively. If the writers of the second amendment could have predicted the effect of this change... The Second...
First Amendment freedoms
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...AMENDMENT Thomas Jefferson once claimed, "A democracy cannot be both ignorant and free." This was the commonly held attitude of the "enlightened" men who settled the United States. The framers of the Constitution believed that if the new U.S. citizens failed to take care to share information completely among themselves, they would be worse off than they had been as subjects of the British monarchy they fled. The new American settlers brought with them a desire for democracy and openness. They left behind a history of tyranny and official control of information. Using this experience as their guide, the constitutional fathers wrote into their new Constitution a Bill of Rights, which contained...
First Amendment: Free speech
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...Amendment and Free Speech: No Freedom should be Absolute of the and Section of the The right to free speech extended by the First Amendment to the Constitution is indeed evocative of the genius and moral stature of the founding fathers. Free speech indeed happens to be the bedrock of a vibrant democracy. However, there is no denying the fact that the right to free speech should be interpreted with deference to some commonsensical restraints and limitations as any freedom that is interpreted in an absolute sense is poised to do more harm than good. The freedom of speech extended by the First Amendment in a way defined the nature of the American democracy. The essential objective enshrined... First...
The Fourth Amendment
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...Amendment Explain why the Fourth Amendment applies to the federal government and also to county and municipal governments. => “As the U.S. Constitution was originally drafted, the Fourth Amendment itself applied to only federal government, but now it is equally applied to state government by the Fourteenth Amendment” (Harr, Hess, and Orthmann199). The Constitution was put in place to regulate the power of the government and its agents. This therefore means that any group or individual acting in behalf of the government will be covered by the Fourth Amendment, and that private groups or individuals are not included (Harr, Hess, and Orthmann 199). Explain the meaning of search and seizure... The Fourth...
Second Amendment Rights
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...AMENDMENT: The Right To Bear Arms A well regulated Militia being necessary to the security of a freeState, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed. (http://www.gpoaccess.gov/constitution/html/amdt2.html.) The right to own a gun has long been debated upon. However, with the increased need for national security as well as self-defence, the passing of the law that protects the values of those who do have guns had been established. Over and over again though, this law had been repeatedly revised so as to be much clearer as to how it pertains to the safety of both the owners and the people living around them. In fact, there had been... THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED S THE SECOND...
The Tenth Amendment
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...Amendment Introduction The Tenth Amendment of the US Constitution guarantees that the Federal Government has control over the States’ rights. The constitution states that the Tenth Amendment only gives limited and enumerated powers. Thus, it means that the power of the Federal Government would theoretically be a non-issue since all the other powers still lie on the States. The Tenth Amendment is stated like this: “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” The Tenth Amendment was put into writing by the Founding Fathers mainly to prevent the Federal Government... Your The Tenth...
The Sixth Amendment
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...Amendment: The Sixth Amendment is specifically designed to afford a fair and equitable trial to those who are being accused of a crime. By stating that the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy trial, the original authors were attempting... Running header: THE RIGHTS OF THE ACCUSED The rights of the accused: Understanding the right to trial, warrant requirements and the difference between reasonable suspicion and probable cause Fill in Your name here Class title here Instructors name here August 19, 2011 The rights of the accused: Understanding the right to trial, warrant requirements and the difference between reasonable suspicion and probable cause Abstract: According to Article III, Section 2 of t...
First amendment assignment
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...Amendment Rights One of the rights guaranteed by the First Amendment is that of the right to free assembly, which is the ability to gather in peaceful groups without interference. The right to assembly also means that the government cannot police what organizations citizens can form or join; however most Supreme Court cases dealing with the right to assembly have to do with citizen's right to gather for peaceful protest. Hague v. Committee for Industrial Organization, 307 U.S. 496 (1939) http://supreme.justia.com/us/307/496/case.html This case involved the freedom of assembly as it has to do with controlling whether or not a certain group could meet in public places. The mayor of Jersey City...
Canon Law & 8th Amendment
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...Amendment Introduction CANON LAW Canon Law is the body of officially established rules governing the faith and practice of the members of a Christian church. Any church's or religion's laws, rules, and regulations; more commonly, the written policies that guide the administration and religious ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Church is the Canon Law. 8TH AMENDMENT Amendment VIII (the Eighth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the U.S. Bill of Rights, prohibits excessive bail or fines, as well as cruel and unusual punishment. The phrases employed are taken from the English Bill of Rights. Description Canon Laws Since the fourth century, the Roman Catholic... Canon Law & 8th...
5th and 6th Amendment
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...Amendment, which, “since it turns upon a reasonableness determination, involves a balance of all relevant factors” (Bloom, 2003, p. 15). In considering the balance of relevant factors, reasonable suspicion is the lower of the two thresholds, with a much flexible standard for police conduct. It involves a factual situation where a “reasonable person” would suspect that illegal activity has... 1.What is the difference between reasonable suspicion and probable cause? How is reasonableness determined? Reasonable suspicion and probable cause are two different standards of what is essentially the same thing; lawful inquiry into the actions of individual citizens. These are considered under the Fourth...
Kefauver-Harris Amendment
2 pages (500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...Amendment A medicinal catastrophe took place in Europe in the 1950s that produced legislation that would everlastingly amend the practice of drug in the United States. The tranquilizer had been advised to European females to assuage queasiness in the earliest trimester of pregnancy. While the sedative was looking out for government authorization in America, general practitioners revealed that Thalidomide ensued in stern birth deficiencies or caused severe bodily malformations, usually missing or distorted limbs in the exposed fetuses (Abraham &Davis, pp. 127-128). The communal protest caused by the Thalidomide calamity near the beginning of 1960s hastily directed... [Supervisor's Kefauver-Harris...
The First Amendment
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...Amendment to the Constitution of the United s of America represented the first ratification to the Constitution. It s back to 1791 and guarantees the Freedom of Religion, Speech, Press, Assembly and Petition. It states: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the Freedom of Speech or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances (The United States Constitution, http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.billofrights.html#amendmenti) The First Amendment speaks to the very heart of what it means to be an American... The First...
The Fifth Amendment Coursework
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...Amendment Why should government be limited on how and when it asks questions? If law enforcement will merely be based on “government agents' ability to obtain confessions from those suspected of committing crimes or knowing who did” (Harr, Hess, and Orthmann 324), there will be a great danger to the civil liberty of the people because the doors of abuse are open. This is why it is necessary that the government is limited on how and when it asks questions. First, the Fifth Amendment states that: “No person shall...be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself” (Harr, Hess, and Orthmann 324). If the government is not limited in this aspect, it will be easy for them... The Fifth...
First Amendment Case
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...Amendment. This case involves the complaint to a mass mailer of sexually explicit pamphlets. It is part of an advertising campaign to sell books. But those who received them became angry and offended. So they filed a complaint. It was earlier decided and the lower court ruled... unclear claim to First Amendment protection. The question now is whether the courts are correct in its decisions. Is it right to assume that the sexually explicit materials are what the decision called as “patently offensive” and could harm the community? Is it correct to make them illegal? The issue is quite controversial and it divides the opinion of the public. There is a significant portion of...
The Workplace Relations Amendment
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...Amendment Act 2005 is one of the landmark legislations within the Australian industrial relation sector for overone hundred years now. It was passed in 2005 and implemented in 2006. The purpose of the bill was to make sure that workers could secure their jobs; this would serve as a platform for economic progress within Australia. But the legislation has not received complete acceptance after implementation. The reform meant that workers engaging in strikes would have to deal with severe consequences. It also facilitated more individual agreements and less collective bargaining by employees. (Parliament of Australia, 2006) The bill has caused strong reactions... Introduction The Workplace relations...
Defamation and the First Amendment
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...Amendment This research explains the different types of defamation, as well as whatdefamation actually is. Additionally, a description of what peoples' free speech rights afforded by the First Amendment, as well as the bounds of this free speech, will be discussed. Finally, an explanation will be given as to what happens in defamation suits, including specific cases as sub-topics, as well as suggested areas of further research. Defamation is a serious offense, punishable by having to either issue an apology, pay a fine, or both.1 Speaking negatively about someone can undoubtedly cause harm to that person's character. However... , what is to be said of the...
2nd Amendment to the Constitution
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...Amendment to the Constitution Table of Contents Introduction 3 History of the Second Amendment to the Constitution 3 Relevant Court Cases Regarding the Second Amendment to the Constitution 5 Statistical Report of Crime Rates in US after the Amendment 7 Both Sides of the Issue 9 Conclusion 10 Works Cited 11 Introduction The Second Amendment to the Constitution of United States was initially included in the Bill of Rights in the year 1791. However, certain arguments and criminal offences were identified in relation to the amendment in the recent years which further led to reconsideration of the enactment. Hence, during the end of June 2008, referring to the case of the District of Columbia v... 2nd...
First Amendment Protection for Spam
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...Amendment Protection for Spam Introduction The article from New York Times has described spam as a "betrayal of all that mail once stood for".1 The most important organizations of internet including policy makers and consumer advocates have agreed to protect the feasibility of e-mails, specifically e-mails that are mostly used on internet. According to them, the Congress must pass on legislation to chop off the amount of spam. 2 Spam messages are used to flood e-mailboxes, all over the internet. They sell everything that can be from sex to education. It is communicated with the internet users either by sending bulk of mails or through the posting of newsgroups, carrying to...
How Durbin Amendment affects consumers
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...Amendment, and its implications on consumers. Slide 2 The organization of the paper is a follows: first part presents a characterization of the Durbin Amendment, part two discusses the impact of this amendment on consumers, and the paper finishes with a conclusion. Slide 3 The Durbin Amendment’s main feature is that it introduces a fixed cap (superior limit) on the amount banks can charge for a debit transaction i.e. cap of 21 cents per swipe, plus 0.05 percent of the transaction. Moreover, it is the possibility of an additional cent charged for banks, which are complying with fraud prevention procedures. Slide 4 In what concerns the implications... of this amendment on...
Gun Control and Second Amendment
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...Amendment has been active for close to half a century now. Lawyers, smen and women and thepublic all agree that of all the issues regarding the United States constitution, the preamble of the Second Amendment has had the most disagreement and probably the least understanding. The National Rifle Association has grown to be the most influential lobby group in the United States today because of its vehement opposition to gun control. This paper will not pretend to provide the ultimate solution to this profound issue. Instead, the paper shall give a brief history of the origins of this debate then it shall look at the extremely confusing word use... Introduction The debate on gun control and the Second...
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