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CANNIBALISM
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...cannibalization. A human coprolite also suggested that the people at the site had been consuming human flesh. The authors are careful to distinguish between different types of cannibalism. They carefully describe both: [I]n situ floor deposit sites and secondary deposit sites, might represent victim and perpetrator communities. At victim sites, villagers were killed, processed, and probably at least partially consumed. At perpetrator sites, captives and body parts would have been brought back, consumed, and then disposed of in a manner similar to routine food refuse. If in situ deposit sites and secondary deposit sites do represent victim...
Cannibalism
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...Cannibalism Introduction Cannibalism refers to the practice of eating human flesh or internal organs by the humans. Philbrick (2001) traces the history of this practice to the eating of human flesh by the fellow persons travelling on the ship. Since long fishermen and sailors have been sustaining themselves by eating their own dead fellows rather than burying them in the sea. The justification for cannibalism came in the shape of its being an absolute necessity sometimes, though it is clearly recognized that eating human flesh may be one of the most sinful acts. This critical essay will provide an anthropological review...
Cultural anthropology and food.
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...food has always endured where the language is lost, or its use is limited. According to the cultural anthropologists, food has been used in observing prestigious festivals and rites. According to John (2001, 128), Korean and Americans have varied preferred food. For instance, Koreans culture can easily be associated with the inclination for moon cakes. While that of people from America is associated with pizza and hamburger eating behaviors. Conclusively, observing the kinds of foods consumed by one, can easily tell their culture. Therefore, according to the anthropologists food and culture are...
ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD : Consuming Passions
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...Anthropology of Food: Consuming Passions Unit Introduction The study of eating and food is said to have a long history in anthropology. Culture and Communication (2004) 1 asserts that these two studies are important for our sake because food is generally important for every one’s survival. This subfield is valuable for debate and advanced research in anthropological methods and theory. Since food studies have been termed as symbolic, political, social value creations, it is dedicated to the art of inspiring and entertaining readers with their latest information and recipes. Individuals who post these adverts equip readers with accessible, sophisticated, entertainment tools and advice... ...
The Anthropology of Food: Consuming Passions
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...Anthropology of Food Consuming Passions Task: Argument on the Use of Food to Make Social Connections Department Grade Course 21ST November, 2011. Introduction Food study and eating habits have a long history in anthropology. Food and culture research is a broad area of study that can be utilized considerably by the scholars. Foods have penetrated almost all fields of study and have gained acceptance as fields of research.1 The study of food and eating is particularly vital as food is highly essential to human beings existence. This context...
Cannibalism in literature
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...cannibals” must consider their positions and do more research instead of simply being superficial in passing judgments. For example, Louise Noble in the article “And make Two Pasties of Your Shameful Heads: Medicinal Cannibalism and Healing the Body, “ concurs that in the past cannibalism was used to demarcate cultural boundaries thus discriminating between barbaric and civilized (Noble p. 678). However, modern medical discourse gives a complex understanding of what it means for humans to eat each other. Noble also considers cannibalism as a desirable practice terming it as the healer of the body. The recent cases of cannibalism especially in non-European nations have... Cannibalism in Literature...
The Anthropology of Food: Consuming Passions
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...Anthropology of Food: Consuming Passions Table of Contents Page # Introduction 3 Tiger Beer Television Advertisement: Description 4 Analysis of the Advertisement 5 Arguments 5 References 7 Introduction Anthropologically speaking, food is the first human need (Counihan & Esterik, 2008, p.29). However, soon after humans cease living off wild berries, this basic human need has become highly constructed (Counihan & Esterik, 2008, p.30). Various preparation techniques and habits have become a significant part of this food consuming system. Psychologically speaking, this new inclusion of food consumption habits and other related habits serve as a communication system between or among the consumers...
The Anthropology of Food: Consuming Passions
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...food applicable to any species that results in malnutrition, starvation, epidemic, and increased mortality” (Glawe, 2009). According to Brown and Eckholm, famine can be understood as “a sudden, sharp reduction in the food supply in any particular geographic locale has usu-ally resulted in widespread hunger and famine” (Brown and Eckholm, 1974, p. 25). Similarly, Aykroyd observes the causes of famine in the following way: “two years of poor rainfall may be followed by a third year without any rain at all... ?Running Head: Politics of Famines Politics of Famines Introduction The history of mankind is fraught with stories of famines. These were times of crops failures, supplies runouts, and massive...
The Anthropology of Food: Consuming Passions
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...foods we eat and how we prepare, the ingredients that we use in making this foods, and ultimately how we consume and share this foods, tells the actual essence of who we are and even where we come from. Food is virtually associated with different aspects of culture such as religious celebrations, meetings, family gatherings, and everyday life all are sure to have food present. Because of this, anthropologist has dedicated most of their research into understanding the socio-cultural, behavioral and political-economic factors related to food and nutrition (Counihan Carole & Van Esterik 2007: 53). This research paper is dedicated towards elucidating the associations... ? Politics of Famine The type of foods ...
The Anthropology of Food: Consuming Passions (topic in document)
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...Anthropology of Food Consuming Passions Task: Argument on the Use of Food to Make Social Connections Department Grade Course 21ST November, 2011. Introduction Food study and eating habits have a long history in anthropology. Food and culture research is a broad area of study that can be utilized considerably by the scholars. Foods have penetrated almost all fields of study and have gained acceptance as fields of research.1 The study of food and eating is particularly vital as food is highly essential to human beings existence. This...
The anthropology of food and meaning in Slav cultures.
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...anthropology of food and meaning in Slav cultures Introduction Across the globe food hasbeen one of the core elements which represent any culture; lifestyle, values, tradition and religion of a certain group, community or area. Any culture is said to be incomplete without having its own ‘food-culture’. From the turkey of thanksgiving in USA to the Sushi in Japan, each of them is a symbol of their own food culture. Undoubtedly, food can be termed as a defining character of any culture. As a matter of fact, anthropologists have made food a separate variable while doing research on cultures, in order to assess the way of living of the different societies in the past and at present... ? In charge] The...
Anthropology
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...ANTHROPOLOGY TO OTHER SOCIAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES Anthropology is the study of human diversity or in general humanity around the world and has its origins in the natural sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences (Eric 227; Herbert 716-731). People who specialize in this subject are called anthropologists. Anthropologists in general look at cross-cultural differences in social institutions, cultural beliefs, and communication styles. In fact in recent years with the growing globalization, this subject has gained much more importance. Knowledge about human diversity is helpful especially in the case of global organizations. Anthropology is made up of four subfields: "Socio... COMPARE AND CONTRAST...
MEDICINAL COURSEWORK
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...food and some medicine. This is because these intake contents have the potential of worsening risk of contracting the disease (Miners, Veronese and Birkett, 1994). Hitherto, it is advised that people who often feel pains in the upper part of their abdomen as depicted in the picture see their doctor immediately. Fig 2. A person with upper abdominal pain Source: Macnair, 2012... ?OMEPRAZOLE Background and Introduction Through the functioning of the immune system, the human body and for that matter the bodies of most living organisms, both animate and inanimate alike are empowered to resist the activities of pathogens and other germs, which bring about diseases (Abelo et al, 2000). This means that on its...
Anthropology
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...food crop cultivation. This led to excessive food production, which in turn led to trade in surplus goods. There was the development of complex form of communication. People also formed government due... to their centralized form of life (Ferraro & Andreatta, 2009). This paper seeks to present some of the biological and/or social consequences of humans switching from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to a farming lifestyle. There were various consequences of human switching from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to a farming lifestyle. Most of these consequences are social and biological. The most significant change was brought by sedentary life. This form of life encouraged high population growth. As a...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology As per Robin Kelley, by “conceiving black urban culture in thesingular” (p.17), anthropologists or other social scientists and researchers (or even ordinary people at a certain level) generalize all African-Americans, lumping them together, so to speak, and giving the image that there is no complexity in the cultural practices and beliefs of the urban black population. This, says Kelley, causes stereotyping of the “underclass” as per the social scientists own definition of the term and, therefore, the reality of different cultures within that same underclass is not discussed among them. For instance, social scientists in the 60s, generalizes all black culture... ?Your Full Your 21 February...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology As per Robin Kelley, by “conceiving black urban culture in thesingular” (p.17), anthropologists or other social scientists and researchers (or even ordinary people at a certain level) generalize all African-Americans, lumping them together, so to speak, and giving the image that there is no complexity in the cultural practices and beliefs of the urban black population. This, says Kelley, causes stereotyping of the “underclass” as per the social scientists own definition of the term and, therefore, the reality of different cultures within that same underclass is not discussed among them. For instance, social scientists in the 60s, generalizes all black culture... Your Full Your 21 February...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology Anthropology is the science that deals with the changes that occur in human behavior, characteristics, culture and views over the period of time. It also studies the occurrence of societies and also studies the reasons behind the destruction of different societies. In other words anthropology is an in depth analysis of the past and present of human beings. Evolution is defined as the changes which occur over a period of time such as changes in the depth and flow of rivers, changes in the forms of natures and climatic changes etc. The term biological evolution specifically defines the changes which occur in the organs... Inserts His/her Inserts Inserts Grade Inserts Here (Day, Month, Year)...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology The relationship between phenotype, genotype, and natural selection is essential to the knowledge of heredity and development organism. Phenotype refers to the traits that an individual has, and is determined by the genotype and the environment. Natural selection comprises of the process which results from differences in reproductive successes among unique individual phenotypes living at a given generation and eventually resulting in a biased representation of genes at the next generation.Natural selection acts on phenotypes because differential reproduction and survivorship depend on phenotype. If the phenotype affecting reproduction or survivorship is...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology Introduction: Considering the world records, it has been obtained that there are around 370 million indigenous people spread across 70 countries. Their history reflects on them been evicted of their lands and having no access to the needful resources depending on the places they live in. They suffer the greatest disadvantages in the world. These are the people who originally lived in some region before the times of colonization or a nation’s transformation, and possess different culture, tradition and language. Several studies have been and are still being conducted on these people to determine their sufferings as well as their struggle with the nature... the charge of teaching...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology Biological Determinism refers to the idea that all people have traits and behaviors basing from their biological framework. The “mis-measure of Man" by Stephen Jay Gould is a book that handles Biological Determinism with rather diverse views. Therefore, Biological Determinism begs to explain why some people are bound to act as they do. Although many people agree that nature and genes count, the likes of Gould refute these ideologies. His ferocity in defending his standpoint is addressed with much tenacity. For example, he argues that biological determinism is more of the social and monetary disparities amongst people as opposed to their genetic history (Gould, 444... Task Anthropology...
Cannibalism in literature
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...cannibalism in the movie by introducing the viewer to the ultimate cannibal ritual. The lighting throughout the scene indicates an evening setting when the sun is almost setting. This is perhaps a depiction that the movie is almost ending and the time for the Frenchman is up. This scene ends with both actors rolling together on the stone and disappears from camera’s view depicting a significant end. This scene enables the producer to avoid violent beheading scenes then after. In fact, we only see the natives eating... Part The scene 08:45 13:32 represents a point in time when the Frenchman is planning for an escape but his “wife”appears unexpectedly and turns the moment into a rehearsal. The scene is...
Anthropology
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...ANTHROPOLOGY 5/24 ANTHROPOLOGY What issue or problem did the s) address?  Answer: The author Pat Shipman has written the article “We are All Africans”. The issue that he discusses in the article is as the name implies the issue of human origin. The author talks about the origin of human development and he mainly bases his argument in favor of the theory of “Out of Africa” which presents the fact that the present human generation has mainly evolved from Africa and this evolution actually took place 100000 to 200000 years back. 2. Why do you think this topic important to physical/biological anthropology? Answer:...
Benefits of medicinal marijuana
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...Medicinal Marijuana Several countries throughout the world are working to decriminalize or legalize less harmful drugs such as cannabis (marijuana). It has been suggested, and in some cases demonstrated, that legalizing or at least decriminalizing marijuana can help to reduce violent crimes and significantly decrease the number of people incarcerated for drug use which would allow more individuals to remain contributing members of society. It would free up funds and law-enforcement manpower to instead combat the more urgent societal issues. Although not legal in the Netherlands, cannabis is openly tolerated and can be both purchased and consumed in one of several... English 101/102 04/13 Benefits of...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology What is anthropology? Why is it important to see the world through an anthropological lens? Anthropology is generally understood as the study of man. As such it “includes the study of human physiology, human psychology, the study of human societies (origins, institutions, religious beliefs, social relationships, etc...) and all the other aspect of human culture, whether past or present” (Glossary). In short, everything related to man comes under the scope of anthropology. It is important to see the world through an anthropological lens because one can know better about one’s...
Anthropology
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...foods that have been adopted by different communities; in this case, it is due to variations in milk consumption across the regions. f). Some alleles are not expressed in the phenotype despite them being part of our genes. They are recessive. 6. a). Genetic drift refers to the changes in gene frequencies over a period of time as a result of the effects of random sampling n a population. The alleles... Human’s Place in Nature A. Natural selection This s the process by which organisms is able to survive the torrents of nature through demonstration of traits that favor their survival. Charles Darwin developed the concept of natural selection. The traits allow the organisms to be able to live and...
Anthropology
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...food, music and attire. This has been aptly demonstrated in Helen Wullff’s research ( South London, 1980) on inter-racial friendships in which a group of teenage girls from different... High school is one of the key spatial sites in our life where we learn a racialised performance of difference.’ "Racism" almost always conjures up visions of white suppression of non-white people. There is a long history of "racism,” Racism refers to discriminatory practices by the predominantly white social majority against Maoris in New Zealand, against aborigines in Australia. Latin America also has its own share of racism toward Blacks. Africans suffering drought, famine, plague and war have claimed that racism...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology Over the times, anthropologists and other theorists have sought to explain the origin of hominid bipedalism through different theories and hypothesis that base their arguments on various aspects of nature. The Savanna-based theory and the postural feeding hypothesis are some of the widely quoted theories in connection with hominid bipedalism. According to the Savanna-based theory, the adoption of the upright posture and the subsequent walking or standing on the two hind appendages was caused by the transition from the lifestyle on trees to erect walking on the savannah (Strickberger 474). Among other scholars, Elizabeth Vrba supports this theory. This theory...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology. 9 (2000): 156-184. Print. Susan C. Antón and J. Josh Snodgrass. “Human Biology and the Origins of Homo.” Current Anthropology Vol. 53, No. S6 (2012): S479-S496... 4th April Evolutionary trends in the genus Homo The discovery of fossils shows evidence of hominoid evolution, and the deviation from the great apes, further excavation have revealed new evidence of few fossil of early hominids. The first group of early hominids were the Australopithecus, evidence adduced shows that they lived in Africa between 4 million to 1 million years ago. They became extinct; it is not in doubt their close semblance to the early human ancestors. Experts in Hominid research refer to them as man-apes and also ape-man this is because they have features of the two...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology" According to Hardy Weinberg equilibrium which is also known as Hardy-Weinberg law, occurrence or presence of alleles remains stable. This is also known as the frequencies of alleles in a given population. This stability of the alleles is responsible to maintain the equilibrium through generations. Alleles are inherited in the similar manner unless their nature is altered by some external forces encompassing environmental factors causing mutation, a genetic drift, meiotic cycle, gene flow or due to non-random mating. Mutation brings modification in the genes, they are capable of altering the genetic sequence and hence they alter or modify the characteristic of the organism. Some...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology In Shadids book (legacy of the prophet) describes new Muslim leaders not rooted in the Ulema, or in the milieu of the Ulema, or in theirforms of social reproduction (families, Madrassa). What are some of the main common and differentiating features of these new leaders and their messages? Ulama is a term used to describe the class of educated Muslim legal scholars, who have completed studies in various Islamic fields such Faqih, Mufti, or Muhadith. In the book “the legacy of the prophet,” Shadid describes how Muslim leaders continue to drift from Ulema. The new class of leaders can easily be recognized by their message and actions. The book illustrates how...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology Anthropology In sociology, a subculture is defined as a culture within the broader mainstream culture withdifferent values, beliefs, and practices. This concept explains the behaviours and beliefs of some social groups in the world. Subculture defines different elements such as where people live, ethnicity, religion, profession, or shared interests. Some subcultures are countercultures. The research on this subject has also focused on other deviances such as criminal subcultures. It is crucial to note that, the study of subcultures elaborates the study of symbolism attached to music, eating habits, clothing, and mannerism. In this essay, we...
Anthropology
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...ANTHROPOLOGY ESSAY QUESTION Renowned anthropologist theorist and researcher Sherry B. Ortner (1974) has made a critical and in-depth analysis of women within biological and cultural perspective, on the foundation of which she has endorsed the relationship between woman and man on the one hand, and between woman and nature on the other. Ortner declares inferiority of women at social scale as the outcome of her biological and physical composition, which not only deprives her of respect equivalent to men, but also are assigned quite different duties, obligations and responsibilities in the light of their innate physical qualities. Hence, it is nature to assign divergent responsibilities to both...
Anthropology
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...food movement is essential as it encourages people to stand for themselves and it can increase bio – diversity .World need to grow locally and need to create unique identity of their culture and community. The two group of people mentioned by author as Tibetan farmers... and Amazon tribal can be benefited from these strategies. Tibetan farmers can be encouraged to engage in more of live stock farming as it could enhance their prosperity and also avail them with meat and milk which is a main part of their diet. Amazon tribes can be prompted to indulge in agriculture of cereals and vegetables which suit their geographical nature and it can give them abundant food source and...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology The legacy of a prophet is a life related story as well as documentary on the Muslim religion with peculiar emphasis given to Muhammad. The political life as well as cultural characteristics takes a centre stage with milieu and ulema leaders. This is due to diverting interpretation of the Muslim law that prevails. The religious leaders of the Muslim community require respect and patience for others. This is evident among the Dalits, which blame the political Ulema for various conditions present at the moment (Shadid 87). For instance, the Ulema led to the development of diverse classes that make living conditions better for some people while others extremely difficult... Task: Anthropology...
Anthropology
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...food. Prehistoric people... Three origins of Native Americans are the Beringia "Land Bridge” route, a coastal route along the Pacific route, and sheets of ice during the Ice Age. Humanity origins can be traced back to Africa. The European continent spread out of Africa. The problem becomes how did Native Americans arrive in America? A consensus is hunters and tribes migrated from the European mass before Columbus. The three possible ways are from a land bridge that connected Siberia and Alaska, a Pacific coastal route, and an ice sheet. If forced to chose, Beringia and the ice sheet would be more probable than a coastal route. The first theory of a land bridge between Siberia and Alaska has been around f...
Anthropology
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...food stamp program Marxism is a concept that attempts to analyse the relationship between the various classes in the society, stating that these societies can be divided into the social structure. The social structure consists of those ideals and establishments that do not deal with the economy and these include the family, governmental organisations, opinionated groups, schooling, and religion. The society is often influenced by the social structure that is prevalent within it and this is the reason why it is important to study the different aspects concerning this subject. The cuts that congress has put on the food stamp program are oppressive to those individuals who... Congressional cuts to the food ...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology Speciation The interbreeding between species should not be a surprising issue at all since there is no decisive factor that states that animals of different species cannot interbreed. There is no norm, which states that, two organisms from different populations can only mate if they are of the same species. According to biological species concept, species can interbreed to produce fertile offspring but are reproductively isolated from other groups (Douglas). From this definition, we find that the interbreeding among different species can be hindered by factors such as geographical distance and behavioral isolation. The main reason why mating between different...
Anthropology
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...Anthropology” Culture is basically defined as the activities which the human beings do. The ethics and the importance of certain things in an individual’s life can also be said to be a part of Culture. This word forms a wide theory on the different events taking place. Culture is an important part in the life of one individual. The world consists of people from different cultures who have different ethics according to this culture. One individual is only easily recognized by the culture he belongs to. For e.g. the culture of Afghanistan can be said as having conservative thoughts where as the culture of UK would have more modernist thoughts. Each and every country has its...
Medicinal and Recreation Marijuana
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...Medicinal And Recreational Marijuana Laws In Texas Medicinal And Recreational Marijuana Laws In Texas Different s of United States of America have separate laws regarding the use, ownership as well as sales of marijuana that is used for both recreational and medicinal purposes. Marijuana is a form of drug that has been used for various medicinal treatment and the benefits associated with its medicinal purposes are still being researched. On the other hand, marijuana has been associated with substance abuse related issues and due to this its use has been banned and it is considered as an illegal element....
THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD AND EATING by Sidney W. Mintz^ and Christine M. Du Bois^
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...anthropology, the writer digresses to the Darwinian Theory of evolution. He tries to integrate it to the ideas fronted in the discourse. This is a very informative journal which provides insightful knowledge on anthropological theories. The last article is on food as well as eating habits. It is an article done by Mintz and Du bois... Anthropology The influence of anthropological ideologies on human life cannot be ignored. Unlike philosophy, it entails dealing with empirically provable facts. Philosophy involves assertions or ideologies whose relevance depends on the argument fronted by the philosopher. The journal article by Johannes Fabian seeks to question fundamental concerns on anthropological...
Medicinal Purposes of Fungi
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...MEDICINAL PURPOSES OF FUNGI 14 April Fungi are a group of organisms that exhibits some characteristics of plants and animals. Although many of them look like plants, they don’t have roots, stems, and leaves as complex as the plants and lack chlorophyll which means they cannot make their own food by photosynthesis. However, like animals they depend on outside source for food. There are more than 100,000 species of fungi (Access Science). Some of these fungi are saprotrophs i.e., they secrete enzymes onto the dead or decaying matter to digest them externally and then absorb the resulting small food particles. Some fungi are...
For some people, monkeys, dogs, donkeys, termites, and grasshopper are highly prize foods. For others, the idea of eating some o
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...foods associated with femininity and a freaky weight consciousness. The views represent particularly dietary choices (p. 95). In African, Christian and Islamic settings, it was common to slaughter animals to mark and observe certain rites of passage in, kingship, birth and naming, circumcision and burial ceremonies. This was shown through the killing, marking with blood, burning and offering of the best parts of the meat to the gods to atone, appease or invoke special blessings to those in authority and families (Joy, 2010:102). Of more importance are the medicinal qualities of dog meat a subject of huge interest in East Asia. In the book... ? WHAT MAKES AN ANIMAL AN ACCEPTABLE FOOD? of due: Introduction ...
Legalization of medicinal marijuana
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...medicinal marijuana Backed up by growing public sentiment and of support from federal Government New Yorkmay get the green signal for legalizing medical marijuana in coming spring. It would be the 22nd state of USA to get this permission. It would be revolutionary legislation as far as the US financial capital is concern. In 1972, the American Congress kept marijuana in Schedule I of their Act of Controlled Substances. It was considered that there is no accepted medical use of Marijuana in medicine. After that time has changed, since then, 21 of 52 US states and Washington DC have legalized the medical use of marijuana. Recent inclusion will go to be New York. Over the years pro... Legalization of...
Medicinal Marijuana Essay
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...foods or prescribed drugs is harmful to human body thus I am as well against any form and means of abuse that pulls down the quality of life. A patient with chronic illness has my support on the use medical marijuana as long as it is seen to be effective and with concrete evidences based on medical test results. Should there be abuse or any adverse reactions from inhaling medical marijuana, it is as well my ethical responsibility to report to the attending physician for review of the medical treatment to protect the life of the patient. Because medicinal marijuana is an issue that calls for more scientific research and stronger legislative directive, I, as a healthcare worker can do my part... ...
Medicinal Marijuana's Pros and Cons
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...Medicinal Marijuana’s Pros and Cons of the Sociology of the Concerned March 22, Medicinal Marijuana’s Pros and Cons Is marijuana a vicious drug or a medicinal plant that could ameliorate the sufferings of many people suffering from painful diseases, this controversy has emerged to be a standing debate in the American society. Many segments of the experts are doubtful as to whether the harmful effects of marijuana outweigh the pharmacological good attributed it? Going by the fact that even drugs that are legal are tagged to pharmacological side effects, many people believe that the side effects attributed to marijuana are not that harmful as they are deemed to be. There is also a segment... of...
The medicinal use of marijuana
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...medicinal use, including Rhode Island, California, Alaska, Hawaii, Colorado, Oregon, Nevada, Montana, Washington, Vermont, Michigan, New Mexico and Maine. Other states have pending legislation or have passed legislation to relax bans against its use. These states and numerous physicians have begun to recognize the real benefits of marijuana as a natural medication that is effective for a number of serious health conditions. Cancer Cancer patients undergoing conventional chemotherapy treatment are also required to take a number of secondary drugs to try to control their pain and nausea. Marijuana can naturally... Benefits of Medical Marijuana Thirteen s currently allow the use of marijuana for...
Legalizing Marijuana for Medicinal Purposes
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...Medicinal Purposes Legalizing Marijuana for Medicinal Purposes The issue if marijuana should be legalized for medicinal purposes has been a bone of contention for decades in the United States. The history of its use could be traced back to centuries, and recent studies have proved several adverse effects the drug can cause on its users. It is being administered on patients who are suffering from nausea and pain caused by cancer and HIV though the drug still lacks FDA approval as a medicinal plant. Various health risks associated with the use of marijuana are often highlighted by the activist groups like Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA). As compared to many... ? Legalizing Marijuana for...
Food
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...food is the way to a long life. Food is considered to be medicinal in China, which also would be considered to be a part of South East Asia, according to some. According to Ishige (2), pork is frequently used in Chinese civilization and culture, but milk is traditionally not used. This is the same for other South East Asia countries. Fermented soy bean, known as jiang, is a staple in many South East Asia countries. This is a seasoning which is considered to be ready made. Fats and oils are traditionally used in cooking as well. The spices and the foods are important because... they are not just considered to be foodstuffs, but also they are considered to be medicines. In many...
Food
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...Foods The article discusses and examines the illnesses that can be associated with food. The United s has often been referred to as a melting pot. This reference and the various cultures make many types of food available to the individual visiting the United States. Yet the article causes individuals to question, regardless of the type of food, can food ever really be deemed safe from possible pathogens. Walking down the street in down town Chicago the visitor finds a variety of delicacies available to them. The main question then becomes what do I have a taste for? Visiting the streets of down town Chicago demonstrates a cultural variety of foods. As you walk down the street... the...
FOOD
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...Food al Affiliation Food Eating Local How could you implement a local diet into your lifestyle? One could implement a local diet into one’s lifestyle by acknowledging first, that there are major benefits from consuming a local diet. The advantages of implementing a local diet could actually be categorized according to the gain that would be generated for one personally; to the community; and to the environment (Shea, 2008). Therefore, to implement a local diet, one needs to follow the guidelines proposed by Priebe (2011) in the article entitled “An Overview of the 100-Mile Diet” published online in ecolife. As noted, a local diet could be implemented through observing the following steps: (1...
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