Planet of the Apes
2 pages (500 words) , Coursework
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...apes. In between 22 million and 5.5 million years ago, dozens of ape genera lived in the Old World. Scientists have identified at least forty ape genera. Today, only five ape genera are around today. These five ape genera are limited to a few areas in Southeast Asia and Africa. Many scientists, including Charles Darwin, have assumed that that African apes and humans evolved from Africa alone. However, more and more evidence is showing that Africa might have seen the first apes; Eurasia was the birthplace of great apes and human clades. This evidence is found through fossils recently excavated. These fossils suggest that two Eurasian ape... 1. Discuss the evolution of human from primates and apes....
Planet of the Apes
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Apes In spite of the fact that it is now and the reviewed film was shot in 1968, it still looks pretty good. Of special and sound effects seem very primitive today, but the storyline and acting is of much better quality than in many modern blockbusters with multi-million dollar budgets. The story itself (philosophy and reflections on human nature) is not a finding of Franklin J. Schaffner, film director, but Pierre Boulle, who is the author of Planet of the Apes book. The novel, which has made Boulle one of the classics of the 20th century literature and canonized his name, was published in 1963. The film appeared five years later. The 60’s... On the one hand they were the years... ?Planet of the Apes In ...
Jane Goodall "What Separates Us from the Apes"
2 pages (500 words) , Movie Review
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...apes. According to theories of evolution, man and apes had common origins. The theory forms the basis of Goodall’s TED talk. Goodall probes the diverse cultures that exists between humans and apes such as the chimpanzees. She bases her findings from Ecuador, Tanzania and Japan among other places in the world. Goodall brings out the cultural behaviour of the people of Ecuador while making comparison to those of chimpanzees. From Goodall’s findings, there are humans who have paints on their faces in the Ecuador tropical rain forest. They also had feathers in their headdresses. Noteworthy... is that these humans fought to keep their way of life. They protected their uncontaminated land and...
The Rise of the Planet of Apes: Film Review
3 pages (750 words) , Movie Review
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...Apes The movie The Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes is about the chimpanzee Cesar who was raised in the home of Will Rodman after Cesar’s mother had to be killed after she went berserk during the process of testing the drug that was supposed to reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s disease. The drug ALZ 112 that was developed to cure Alzheimer’s disease had an unexpected effect of boosting a chimpanzee’s intelligence which Cesar had inherited from his mother. The rest of the movie revolves around the struggle of Cesar to fit in the world of human beings but could not because he is a chimp. The movie illustrated that no matter how smart a chimp can get (in the character of Cesar... ?The Rise Of The Planet Apes ...
Planet of the Apes : A Lesson in Manners and Humanity
14 pages (3500 words) , Essay
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...Apes–A Lesson in Manners and Humanity Planet of the Apes is a classic movie of 1968, based on the concept of a planet ruled by the Apes and humans serve as their servants. The movie is based on the ruling class, which is further divided into sub-classes and it presents a sketch of a wee-knit society, where humans are hunted for sport, used for manual labor, scientific experimentation or executed out-rightly. The sociological and physiological interpretations used in the movie reflect various incidents through which the West was going; and these facts were stated in a specific state of mind as is proved by the movies... ?KarissaSjawaldy RELS1260 Winborne February 19 Midterm Research Paper Planet of the...
Planet of the Apes A Lesson in Manners and Humanity
14 pages (3500 words) , Essay
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...Apes–A Lesson in Manners and Humanity Planet of theApes is a classic movie of 1968, based on the concept of a planet ruled by the Apes and humans serve as their servants. The movie is based on the ruling class, which is further divided into sub-classes and it presents a sketch of a wee-knit society, where humans are hunted for sport, used for manual labor, scientific experimentation or executed out-rightly. The sociological and physiological interpretations used in the movie reflect various incidents through which the West was going; and these facts were stated in a specific state of mind as is proved by the movies... KarissaSjawaldy RELS1260 Winborne February 19 Midterm Research Paper Planet of the...
Research into Teaching Language to Apes Always Attracts Curiosity and Attention.
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...Apes Always Attracts Curiosity and Attention. Discuss the Extent to Which Such Studies Contribute to Our Understanding of How Children Learn Language Since the 1960's and 70's, several studies have been carried out which attempted to teach apes of one kind or another to speak. Although it can be accepted that apes and humans have much in common in the way of anatomical and genome resemblances, little or no actual 'speech' success has been achieved. Many scientists consider that apes do not lack the intelligence to speak but the physical differences in the oral cavity, tongue, vocal tracts etc. make it impossible for them to create the sounds. We know though... 1. Research into Teaching Language to...
Relate terms from 3 chapters (I have typed notes) to a movie summary (Planet of the Apes)
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...Apes The movie highlights the survival of an ape, Caesar, in a human society, which culminates in vengeance against a manager of a pharmaceutical company who used apes as test subjects in a research aimed at developing medical drugs (Claire). Some the terms in the three chapters have a degree of relation to the plot of the movie and some of the research undertaken in the film. In the film, there are two social structures, namely, the human and ape structures. In both social structures, there are practices, which make life predictable. The social structure established determines the position of each member in the society. For instance, in the zoo, there are female apes loyal... to the...
Human vs. Animals: Who has the real Power? A study based on the movie Planet of the Apes
11 pages (2750 words) , Research Paper
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...Apes – a lesson in manners & humanity Planet of the Apes is a ic movie of 1968, based on the concept of a planet ruled by the Apes and humans are their servants. The movie is based on the ruling class which is further divided into sub-class and presents a sketch of a wee-knit society. Where humans are hunted for sport, used for manual labor, used for scientific experimentation or executed out rightly. The sociological and physiological interpretations used in the movie reflect various incidents through which the West was going through. And these facts were sated in specific state of mind as is proved by the movies of The Apes series. Racial discrimination is still present and prevalent... Planet of the...
Relationships between primates and their environments.
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...apes and humans. However, they differ from both species in diploid chromosomal number, body size and cranial form. Gibbons are inhabitants of vast habitats all around Southeast Asia. The adult size may vary from 45 cm to 90 cm while they may weigh around 5 to 12 kg... Relationships between Primates and Their Environment Relationships between Primates and Their Environment Non-humanprimates are restricted in their normal habitats mainly to the subtropical and tropical regions of both Old and New Worlds. In order to explore the primate ecology, two primates have been selected and they are Gibbons and Orangutans. Gibbons belong to the biological family Hominoidea and are part of a sister group to great apes ...
Reflection 10
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...apes. Among many other researchers who have made contributions to demonstrating linguistic aptitude in apes, Sue Savage-Rumbaugh stands distinguished in respect that she dedicated her whole life to studying Kanzi. The main argument put forth by Savage-Rumbaugh is that Kanzi’s advanced linguistic aptitude denounces all such ideas which are skeptical of the ape language project. Among many critics of Kanzi project is Wynne who argues that advanced language aptitude is something which is possessed by humans alone and the decisive factor... 11 April Reflection: Kanzi is a very popular male bonobo or chimpanzee who has beenextensively featured in myriad research studies done on linguistic aptitude in apes....
Primate Observations
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...Apes and monkeys Introduction Primates are mammals such as humans, apes, and monkeys among many others. They are of the order primates believed to have arisen from common ancestors who lived on trees in the tropical regions of Africa and East Asia. Different species of the order primates responded differently to their respective subsequent environments thereby resulting in unique adaptive features thereby becoming completely different animals. Humans are the most civilized of the primates and possess distinct features from the rest of the non-human primates such as monkeys, chimpanzees, and apes among others. However, some of the non-human primates possess... ?Zoo Assignment- Primate Observations Apes...
Humans & others mammals
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...Apes are mammals, belong to the Hominidae family and the species Homo sapiens, can be used to compare humans and other mammals. Animals like the chimpanzees, apes and bonobos are good examples which through... Anthropology Part I The topic of evolution has been explained in different ways. Many theories that explain evolution have been developed. Most of the theories have been criticized since people have different opinions to them. However, the differences and similarities that are evident in humans and other mammals are a definite proof that evolution took place (Barton 34). This paper will discuss the different similarities and differences in mammals and how they prove that evolution occurred. Apes ar...
Anth week 3
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...apes that existed before from which the modern day monkeys, apes, and humans originate. In primate systematics, the naming closely follows the taxonomic principles as stipulates by Carolus Linnaeus but sometimes differentiating between Chimpanzees and gorillas can be challenging. However, this is simple to humans whose ancestor is more contemporary so their naming is in accordance with their evolutionary relationships. The reason as to why current primates look more primitive is that they did not take a similar lineage route as that of the contemporary monkey and apes but instead remained in such islands... as Madagascar thus acquiring a new ecological niche of which they adapted to...
Primate
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...apes. Primates are those living beings, which have the characteristics of forward-facing eyes and highly flexible arms, legs and fingers. Chimpanzee belongs to the hominidae family, and has close evolutionary relation to the humans. “The Great apes and we are so close, that it is obvious that a fundamental error was made when classifying ourselves as something separate”(Caldecott, Miles 12 ).Male Chimpanzees are taller and heavier than their female counterpart. They have arms, which are longer than their legs and is an avid tree climber. They usually walk on all fours with the use of their knuckles supporting... , gestures and hands. Chimpanzees are social animals and live in small, stable...
The article is Origin of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in gorillas by Weimin Liu1
3 pages (750 words) , Research Paper
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...apes. Fecal samples were collected and used to assess the DNA sequences. The study was mainly based in central Africa where 3000 samples were collected. According to the research, Western gorillas and chimpanzees contain Plasmodium infection. Otherwise, bonobos as well as eastern gorillas do not contain the infection. The study also revealed that the infections contained mixed species. Over 1100... Origin of the Human Malaria Parasite The article Origin of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in gorillasseeks to establish the evolutionary history and origin of Plasmodium falciparum which is a common malaria parasite in human beings. It involved analysis of DNA sequences in wild-living apes....
Chapter 6
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...apes: implications for understanding fossil hominoid ecology ,STANFORD CRAIG B. Primatesvol: 47 issue: 1 page: 91-101 year: 2006 What issue or problem did the author(s) address The author, Craig B. Stanford has addressed the "behavioural ecology" of the apes as evidence of the behaviourisms of connected species like the extinct ape and hominid taxa. According to him it has also been shown by some studies that chimpanzees and gorillas often live nearby or occupy the same area of land without interbreeding. Recent Studies, according to the author have also depicted very different behavioural and biological patterns between the two... Article The behavioural ecology of sympatric African...
Hunting the First Hominid
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...apes (gorillas, chimps, orang-utans and gibbons). The time of divergence of each ape and hominid lineage from the common stem may be generally represented in a “sort of hairy Y diagram, with multiple branches instead of simply two as is usual on a Y.” The explicit pathway of evolution can be traced only through fossil records of extinct species located... “Hunting the First Hominid Summary. The origins of the human species remains of great interest to man. The basic characteristics of hominids are conjectured to be thinking, tool-making, talking, hunting, scavenging and bipedalism. However, the First Hominid is yet to be definitively identified. Genetically, man is only marginally different from the...
Are humans unique?
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...Ape Genius” delves in to the dynamics of the genetic relationship between human beings and apes that also forms the basis of the theory that human beings had in fact evolved from apes. Though, the theory continues to be scrutinized by the society, it still cannot be denied that chimpanzees have great deal in common with human beings. Recent researches and observation of these primates have clearly shown that and is compiled in the documentary. The researchers discuss the theory of the ‘Triangle’, which is a term used to refer... Are human beings unique? After watching the hour long documentary, my mind was indeed invaded by questions regarding the uniqueness of our species. The PBS documentary titled...
Compare/Contrast Essay
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...ape called Kala adopts him. He is named Tarzan meaning 'white skin'. Tarzan is raised amongst apes and becomes ignorant. Tarzan decides to avenge her death and starts raiding the tribe for weapons. He also... ?Comparison of The Lady with the Pet Dog" by Anton Chekhov, and Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs This essay is a comparison of The Lady with the Pet Dog by Anton Chekhov with Tarzan a story written by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The essay focuses on the different themes in the two stories particularly the theme of love in Chekhov’s story as likened to that or hatred in Edgars story. Other aspects such as plot character, points of view, setting, tone, and themes in the two stories will be compared. The Lady...
The Evolution of Walking Upright
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...apes or other species which spend more energy while walking on their four. Though the initial thinking in anthropology was based upon the fact that hominids are different due to their big brains however, this thinking clearly changed as more historical research came to the light. The evolution of the walking upright and how humans learned to walk on two legs took place over the period of centuries. Early humans use to climb trees easily due... to their ape like traits however; this was considered as necessary to allow humans to actually live in different habitats. The overall history of walking upright and how humans developed this ability therefore is almost 6 million years...
Elements of Genre
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...Apes,” “The Creature from the Black Lagoon,” and “The Shining” are analyzed and discussed in the context of the “thriller” genre of movies. The directors’ usage of music and conflict between the characters is incorporated to increase tension, anxiety and the conflicts in the viewer, thus defining the “thriller” genre. Movie Genres: Thrillers In the world of movie genres, the “thriller/suspense” genre is a hybrid with other genres, such as “crime-thrillers,” “western-thrillers.” and “horror-thrillers.” Three of the movie clips viewed in this assignment fall into the thriller/suspense genre of movies. Thrillers are meant to instill a high sense... ? School/College Three movie clips from “The Planet of the...
Answer 5 questiona thoroughly and accurately
3 pages (750 words) , Assignment
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...apes and Australopithecus. In this case, homo florensiensis can be dated to human ancestral linage as they bare similar characteristics. Their feet are estimated to be 20 centimeters long similar to those of the chimpanzee as well as the astralopiths. The floresiemsis foot longitudinal arch which is a feature present in both Homo erectus and Homo sapiens. Question 3 Non-metric methods are anomaly traits found in skeletons. They cannot be measured thus are recorded on the basis of presence or absenteeism. They are thought to maintain a genetic origin thus favorable method of determining the relationship between existing and extinct or dead species. In this case, many archaeologists use... Analysis of...
Are human the only animals with theory of mind?
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...apes have “Theory of mind”, they are self-conscious and they can learn some basics of language even1. There are certain theorists who claim that since humans have evolved from apes, humans have more of what apes already possess. Since beliefs, concepts etc are already possessed by apes, humans have more of these, as per evolutionary evidence. Other theorists however, claim that there is a sharp discontinuity between apes and humans. They state that humans possess certain cognitive... ? Are humans the only animals with theory of mind? According to “Theory of mind ToM proposed by George Herbert Mead, the human mind comprises ofseveral mental states like beliefs, emotions, desires, intentions, perceptions,...
Choose one of the following
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...apes (though circumstantially) use their limbs to locomotive purposes. Fossil evidence of hominid ancestor’s bipedalism is constructed to imply that it existed about 3.5... Compare two different hypotheses that attempt to explain the origins of hominid bipedalism How secure do you think the evidence is to verify either view? Introduction The origin of bipedalism, a key characteristic of the hominids, has been accredited to numerous contending hypotheses, and this paper will discuss two major hypotheses postural feeding hypothesis by hunt and thermoregulatory hypothesis by Wheeler. Most terrestrial mammals use four limbs for locomotive a purpose that is they are quadrepedal humans and other great apes...
Since humans and chimps are similar, do you think it would be useful to use chimps as stand-ins for humans during scientific res
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...apes and human beings, in trials and research. Some processes can only... ?Since humans and chimps are similar, do you think it would be useful to use chimps as stand-ins for humans during scientific research? Or since theyare similar, do we have a moral obligation not to use them in research. The genetic similarity between humans and chimps has been known for many decades now, and over the years chimps have already been found useful in research to test out various illnesses, symptoms and cures. There is even a journal called the Journal of Medical Primatology which debates issues surrounding this subject. Clearly there is no fundamental ethical question about using animals, including both the great apes ...
Outline and Annotated bibliography
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...apes are not at all primitive but they are as evolved as hominids “though within extant ape lineages” (Lovejoy et al., 2009, p.74). Ardipithecus ramidus with its features matching with hominids also gave rise to the conclusion that humans and Chimpanzees though might have had a common ancestor, soon after it’s progenies split into hominids and Chimpanzees... Ardipithecus ramidus and its relationship to humans and chimpanzees Introduction The paramount importance of the discovery of Ardipithecus ramidus has been that it corrected a prevailing false notion- seeing Chimpanzees as a link in the ancestral lineages of hominids (Lovejoy et al., 2009). Instead it reinforced the theory that says, modern apes are ...
What is Archaeology
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...apes are the ancestors of human beings. The main question will be “why apes no longer evolve or why don’t humans evolve to become another creature.”? This concept seems unclear to many students because the concept of human evolution is not convincing, and other archaeological facts that history depicts (Davis, 2005... Archaeology Archaeology is the general study of human activities in the past. Archaeology studies the origin of human beings through ancient fossils, and artifacts. According to the study of archaeology, human beings emanated from Africa more than four million years ago. The species of human that were close to the modern man were the Neanderthal who disappeared more than thirty thousand...
Ardipithecus Ramidus and Its Relationship to Humans and Chimpanzees
9 pages (2250 words) , Term Paper
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...ape ancestors were diverging from the monkeys’ evolution path. The other gap is the hominid gap and is estimated to date back to about 4.5 to 14 million years ago. It is believed that during this period, the human ancestors and extant ape ancestors separated from a common... ?Running head: ANTHROPOLOGY Ardipithecus Ramidus and Its Relationship to Humans and Chimpanzees Insert Insert Grade Insert 09 March 2012 Ardipithecus Ramidus and Its Relationship to Humans and Chimpanzees Introduction There have been two major gaps in the fossil record in tracing human evolution. The hominoid gap is the first and is said to date back to approximately 22-32 million years ago. This is the period that the human and ape...
A Theme In Human Evolution
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...apes-like creatures and shares certain features with these animals. Taxonomists classify man in the same family with apes like chimpanzees, gorilla, and orangutans. There are fossil evidences that have provided the research scientists with enough proofs of the process of evolution in various organisms (MacKenzie, Arwine & Shewan, 293). The early man depended on wild fruits and vegetations for food. They had large jaws and teeth for this function. The need for man to continue surviving among the wild predators... ?Running head: A THEME IN HUMAN EVOLUTION A theme in human evolution Insert Insert Grade Insert May 23, A theme in human evolution Introduction The universe comprises various materials that...
Since humans and chimps are similar, do you think it would be useful to use chimps as stand-ins for humans during scientific research? Or since they are similar, do we have a moral obligation not to use them in research?
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
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...apes and human beings, in trials and research. Some processes can only... Since humans and chimps are similar, do you think it would be useful to use chimps as stand-ins for humans during scientific research? Or since they are similar, do we have a moral obligation not to use them in research. The genetic similarity between humans and chimps has been known for many decades now, and over the years chimps have already been found useful in research to test out various illnesses, symptoms and cures. There is even a journal called the Journal of Medical Primatology which debates issues surrounding this subject. Clearly there is no fundamental ethical question about using animals, including both the great ape...
Science Fiction Film
7 pages (1750 words) , Research Paper
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...Apes (Franklin J. Schaffner 1968) and 12 Monkeys (Terry Gilliam 1995) speculate on the of animal ethics? How do the films engage with issues related to posthumanism? Discuss. Introduction to Science Fiction: Science fiction is an amazing and spectacular genre, which started in 1902. “Science Fiction films have been with us since 1902, when Georges Melie’s 3 minute epic Le Voyage Dans La Lune took cinemagoers off the planet for the very first time. (Si-Fi Film History) (“Le Voyage Dans La Lune” means a trip to the moon.). While describing Science Fiction, Cramer (1994) states, “Science fiction allows us to understand and experience our past, present, and future in terms... ?In what ways do Planet of the...
Zoo Activity. Monkey
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...ape-like features to their current Homo sapiens status. However, this does not necessarily mean that human beings and apes such as monkeys belong to one single species. The truth, as has been revealed by several researchers, is that these organisms are related. They must be having something common in their DNA which proves that they were initially belonging into the same species. However, as time went by, several changes occurred in the environment... which necessitated the development of more species from the already existing ones. For instance, as a result of the plate tectonics, several regions of the world were separated a part. As a result, the continents separated by large masses of...
Discussion
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...apes shows a close relationship with that of humans indicating that human beings must have had their origin from apes. Darwin also uses evidence of evolved tools to prove his theory of evolution using fossil records. The early man used sharp stone tools and iron tools. This is evident from data collected by Darwin in caves where the early man lived. According to many anthropologists, man has just evolved recently during the last 50, 000 years providing fresh evidence on evolution. The change in technology, language, culture, and specialized lithic technology has changed gradually changed human behavior. Works Cited Darwin Charles. The Descent of Man, and...
Where have all the werewolves gone?
1 pages (250 words) , Book Report/Review
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...apes to be closer to people of color than themselves (Regal). Tyson found difficulty to speak out that humans were really close to apes, because of the fear of upsetting Christians. Therefore, the death of werewolves was because of little evidence to continue supporting their existence. Instead, Charles Dawning’s evidences pointed, in other directions whenever there was something to connect humans to the werewolves. There has been a belief in existence of werewolves since the early centuries; however, the evolution theory did not put them anywhere in the origin of man. In conclusion, the death... Where have all Werewolves gone? This article focuses on the origin and connection of supernatural creatures...
Outline and Annotated bibliography
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...apes are not at all primitive but they are as evolved as hominids “though within extant ape lineages” (Lovejoy et al., 2009, p.74). Ardipithecus ramidus with its features matching with hominids also gave rise to the conclusion that humans and Chimpanzees though might have had a common ancestor, soon after it’s progenies split into hominids and Chimpanzees... ? Ardipithecus ramidus and its relationship to humans and chimpanzees Introduction The paramount importance of the discovery of Ardipithecus ramidus has been that it corrected a prevailing false notion- seeing Chimpanzees as a link in the ancestral lineages of hominids (Lovejoy et al., 2009). Instead it reinforced the theory that says, modern apes...
The Whiteman's Burden
2 pages (500 words) , Book Report/Review
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...ape... The Whitemans Burden by Winthrop Jordan Review Among Jordan W.’s work is a book, Whiteman’s Burden, written in the year 1974. Jordan is a young, philosophical black American who is extremely concerned about racism. His main objective is the historical origin of racism in America in which the blacks are discriminated by the whites. In his writing, Jordan gathers information from the initial contact between Europeans and Africans. Winthrop Jordan starts his study way back in the year 1812 during which the current notions were established. He offers different assumptions on discrimination against the blacks in America (Jordan, 1974). To start with, Jordan portrays and associates African with evils in ...
Zoo activity: white-handed gibbon.
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...apes, gibbons do not create sleeping nests. They just sleep alone or with some gibbons huddled... zoo activity SCIENTIFIC Hylobates lar COMMON white-handed gibbon OBSERVATION TIME: two hours DESCRIBE THE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOURS DRAW LABELLED DIAGRAMS OF THE FOLLOWING LOCOMOTION Hanging with one hand and normally acrobatic in locomotion. Gibbons are very acrobatic and agile. They use most of their life in the trees and are brachiators. They are adapted for arboreal locomotion HANDS AND FEET RESTING Brown vertically hanging resting with one hand holding the rail while the rest of the body rest on the bridge SLEEPING The black one is sleeping horizontally on the pavement Different from other ap...
Neuroscience
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...apes" and appear to be "one happy family, trying to live together is a different experience all together. This episode is about a chimp named Lucy, which teaches humans about the ups and downs of growing up to be a human. The episode also provides an overview experience of a visit to Des Moines where there is the Great Ape Trust and the experience of bonobo culture is highlightened. The tale of Lucy is elaborated by Dr... ?Neuroscience: Radiolab Episode Review The radiolab episode chosen for this review is Lucy of the episode 2 of season 7. This episode in radiocast isabout living together between chimps, bonobos and humans. Though all these different creatures fall into the same animal category, "apes"...
Linguistics Essay
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...apes have more idea of what language is, and a few have even been taught to communicate true lexical units and sentences through sign language... The Nature and Origin of Human Language: an Evaluation of Genetic and Social theories. The origin of human language lies so far back in time that there are only myths, legends and religious texts to explain it (Denning, Kessler and Leben, 2007, p. 136). There seems to be no obvious way for scholars to work out the details of exactly what the circumstances were which caused the homo sapiens species to develop language skills. Two main approaches have been suggested to explain the origins of language, and both of them appear on the surface at least to provide...
Origins of hominid bipedalism
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...apes (though circumstantially) use their limbs to locomotive purposes. There are numerous hypothesis developed by anthropologists trying to reconnect this thought, (Rodman and McHenry 103) observed that energetically humans are inefficient running at high speeds. Therefore, bipedalism evolution in human beings cannot be pointed to energy saving purposes during locomotion but bipedalism in humans is as efficient as quadrapedalism in land mammals. The other great apes for example chimpanzees do not have a straight gait and human straight gait... 5 April Origins of hominid bipedalism Most terrestrial mammals use four limbs for locomotive a purpose that is they are quadrepedal humans and other great apes...
Answer at least 5 queations thoroughly
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...Apes and Monkeys Apes have no tails; they are large and cumbersome; the body posture is upright, and the ratio of their brains to their body is bigger than the monkeys. Monkeys have tails, smaller body sizes with relatively equal hind limbs and forelimbs order (Walker and Suzanne 178). Primate is in two groups the Prosimians and anthropoids (simians). Monkey and apes fall under simians. Primate sub-orders Strepsirrhini, (wet-nosed primates), consisting of non-tarsier prosimians, and the suborder Haplorhini (dry-nosed... Anthropology Q1 Comparing Features features Homo erectus Neanderthalensis Homo sapiens Brain size Range between 850 and 1100 cc 1450cc 1350cc to 2000cc Cranial features Cranial vault, ...
Primate communication and language
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...apes, chimpanzees, baboons and others of monkey family line. The language includes auditory, visual, chemical, and other body language methods. The paper delves on communication within the primate community. The paper discusses the use of the unique language methods of the primate groups. Nonhuman primates use language to communicate survival-laden information. Non - human Primate Communication and Language Communication among nonhuman primates centers on routine... Primate Communication and Language (Anthropology) November 9, Pages: 5 Nonhuman primate communication and language Introduction Nonhuman primates communicate with each other using understandable language. The nonhuman primates include the ap...
Discussion Forum #1 - Becoming Human
1 pages (250 words) , Movie Review
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...apes. The development of apes according... Development of bipedalism and human intelligence According to the video, many bipedal species dominated the untamed planet.The core aim of the video is to answer the question; how did we become us? In the documentary, Zeresenay sets out to search for fossilized evidence of the ancestors. He finds a tiny skull. The nearby geology indicates white bands of volcanic ash dated to 3.4 Mya. Zeresenay names this skull ‘Selam. At the museum, Salem is compared to another Skull; Lucy. Advances in scientific technology indicate that molecular clock. The rate of DNA sequences and it goes back to 6Mya before Selam and the missing link. The skull, sahelanthropus tchadensis wa...
The Language Learning Ability of a Specific Animal
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...apes with the key focus and objective being on the animal’s... ? The language learning ability of a specific animal al Affiliation) Imitation is considered as an advanced behavior which involves the observation and replication of other’s actions and behaviors. Imitation is a vital part of social learning through which culture and tradition are developed. The transfer of information, especially customs and behavior down the generation and between individuals is made possible through imitation. Studies, researches and experiments have shown the imitation does not require genetic inheritance but rather a conducive environment. There have been a vast number of researches and experiments conducted on apes...
Creation vs. Evolution
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...apes and this is indeed a fact as there are numerous evidences to prove this fact (Scott 64). However, this essay intends to critically analyze the broad understandings regarding the various aspects of creation and evolution. The role that God played in relation to these two aspects will be also be broadly analyzed upon. DISCUSSION The notion of Creation vs. Evolution has been discussed in the book titled ‘The Case for Faith’ written by Lee Strobel. The book... ?Creation vs. Evolution INTRODUCTION The study will primarily focus on the notion of creation vs. evolution as per the opinions of Christian and Non-Christian believers. In relation to human psychology, the term ‘creation’ can be understood as the ...
Do Talking Gorillas and Signing Chimpanzees and Bonobos Have Rights and What Distinguishes Them from Human Rights?
5 pages (1250 words) , Research Paper
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...ape family are able to make a number of signs to express their desires and emotions. This is similar to the words and signs used by human beings for communication purpose. Bekoff (2010), states that “Some of the reports by ape language researchers suggest that nonhuman great apes may be remarkably creative in producing new signing combinations” (p.307). The research works based upon the sign language used by apes prove that they are special among the animals because they make use of signs as the medium of communication and are able to improve the same. On the other... ?Critical Thinking: Do talking gorillas and signing chimpanzees and Bonobos have rights and what distinguishes them from Human Rights? The ...
Response to Evolution questions
4 pages (1000 words) , Research Paper
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...apes are the predecessors of evolved species called humans. The authors, Hughes et al. observe that humans share nearly 95% of their DNA structure with chimpanzees who are considered closest animal relatives to humans. Since evolution has come into the knowledge... Response to Evolution questions Rough Draft Evolution can be regarded as the mutation which takes place in an organism in consecutive generations. Heng postulates that predecessors often inherit such changes and evolution explains the variety of such changes at each and every level of organic structure. Natural selection is a slow and steady process by which biological mannerism becomes common in any population of an organism. This is the prim...
Reading summary
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...apes. Ebola affected humans in 2001, and by mid-2002, gorillas were dying of it as well. Although difficult, it was possible to form an accurate analysis of the number of gorilla deaths in the dense African forests because of an ongoing study of 143 gorillas in a game reserve south of Congo's Odzala National Park. By 2003, 130 of the monitored gorillas died of Ebola... outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus between 2001 and 2005 which claimed 254 human lives may also have wiped out 5,500 of the endangered western-lowland gorillas in the smaller Republic of Congo. The carrier for this highly contagious and almost always fatal disease remains unknown, but it predominantly affects humans and apes. Ebola...
Darwin
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...apes. The intelligent level and social existence of apes match with human beings on a great level. But in the journal article by Cosans there is a contradiction on the fact where theology entangls with evolution. In this article Cosans put forward... the statements mentioned by eminent anatomist Owen, where he suggests that God has no power in the human evolution theory. Considering the journal by Cosans, it cannot be stated that Darwin only concentrated on evolution as a divine process. He studied the subject visiting many earth zones and found that life originated from microorganisms and it went on to evolve into animals and ultimately in to intellectual beings. Darwin here is not...
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