Influence of habitat diversity and substratum on the composition of macroinvertebrate communities from riverine systems
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...invertebrate refers to aquatic invertebrates (stream dwelling organisms without vertebrae that can be seen with the naked eye). Most macro invertebrates are aquatic insects or aquatic stages of insects (e.g. larvae Ephimeroptera and Trichoptera), crustaceans (e.g. amphipods), mollusks (e.g. aquatic snails) and worms (e.g platyhelmenthes). They usually inhabit a wetland or river channel. Since macro invertebrates have varying degrees of resistance to pollution and other changes in environmental conditions, they serve as "bio indicators" for various factors involving steam health. They are a key component of the food chain and their abundance and diversity have been used... Traditionally, the term macro...
Make one up
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...invertebrates. They get their food from shallow water. It has also been discovered that they leave their nests at night to go catch their prey. For them, vision is not important as touch and that is why they can even fish at night. This is because they feed on specific foods, which are aquatic. This means they can only be found in places near water they are used to a certain climate and are rare to find. References Peterson, T. (2010). Peterson Field Guide to Birds of Eastern and Central North America. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcout. Ralph, J., Sauer, J., & Droege, S. (2012). Monitoring Bird Populations by Point Counts. New York: Independent Publishing...
Bisphenol A (BPA)
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
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...aquatic life due to leaching of BPA from landfills which consist of mixed wastes of disposed plastic and metal objects. As such, organisms like fish, reptiles, amphibians, and several aquatic invertebrates have been reported to suffer from endocrine-based consequences upon exposure to moderately toxic BPA levels. Other relevant findings also demonstrate environmental hazards posed by BPA on terrestrial wildlife and leguminous plants through its interfering action on certain processes required... 1) What is BPA (Bisphenol-A)? What do they use it for? What is the health impact of this chemical on your health and the environment? What can you doto minimize the impact of BPA on yourself and the environment? ...
Discuss using named examples, the use of and applicability of bio-indicator organisms in the environmental assessment of fres
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...aquatic environmental changes (Giesy, Newsted, Lam and Wu 2008). They can be used to measure the ecosystem’s responses to global warming since their breeding success in land is a bit easier to monitor than the tropic changes in water. For instance, when the sea temperatures are high, the reproduction of copepod species of Pribilof Islands declines. This results in reduction of the offspring of the species. Most aquatic invertebrates also referred to as benthic macro-invertebrates, live at the bottom of water bodies. Benthic macro-invertebrates, such as, polychaetes can be used to determine the quality of...
Kalamazoo River PCB content or Oil Spill
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...aquatic life and a natural habitat for several fish species. It has ponds and a natural scene that is conducive for most aquatic invertebrates. The river has though undergone a lot of pollution from industrial wastes in the past. Despite the continued efforts to clean the river of industrial wastes, the presence of chemicals left behind by previous pollution is still a setback to the efforts. A major oil spill that occurred in the Kalamazoo River in 2010 spelled a major disaster as a broken pipeline leaked a million gallons of diluted bitumen... Kalamazoo River Oil Spill The Alliance for Great Lakes (AGL) is a great advocate for environmental conservation, the mainconcern being water resources in the...
Hudson River Dredging
15 pages (3750 words) , Essay
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...aquatic invertebrates typically recolonize abandoned areas. Operations should be scheduled to avoid known periods of spawning and migration. During the dredging of the upper Hudson River, the nearby human communities are bothered by noise, lights, odors, and temporary closures of roads and navigation channels. These problems can be minimized by taking appropriate actions. The management of waste sediments will be an extensive and challenging operation; and should be carefully designed and implemented to avoid disturbing the adjacent human communities. The plan should include the transportation of the wastes to an out-of-state hazardous waste...
Aquatic and Terrestrial ecosystems
3 pages (750 words) , Download 1 , Research Paper
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...Aquatic and Terrestrial ecosystems Aquatic and Terrestrial ecosystems River systems essentially channel the world’s precipitation into surface water systems like lakes and seas. These river systems provide habitats for a vast range of biota, which often culminate in floodplain wetlands that are also regions of astonishing diversity. River systems are critical to most marine, and coastal environments, organisms and processes. Their fresh waters allow humans to infiltrate and dwell in the world’s most inhabitable regions such as deserts. Rivers are the pathways that exemplify ecological landscapes. The climate, as well as the characteristics of land...
Natural Resources and energy paper
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...aquatic ecosystems are comprised of such organisms that form the food web for other living beings. These organisms available in the freshwater are both ecologically and economically important as they are diverse in form and nature. Benthic communities refer to the lives available at the bottom of the freshwater systems constituting organisms like algae, bacteria, fungi, and other invertebrates that are capable of transforming substance and energy into living forms, thus... Natural Resources and Energy Introduction: Aquatic ecosystems represent those ecosystems that are under the control of water. Freshwater aquatic ecosystem is one of the forms of aquatic system providing highly useful energy resource...
Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecosystems
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Aquatic and Terrestrial ecosystems Part 2 An aquatic ecosystem is the ecosystem which is made up of water bodies like oceans, seas, rivers, ponds etc. aquatic ecosystems has two main forms- the marine or saltwater ecosystems and the freshwater ecosystems (Miller & Spoolman, 61). Approximately 71% of the surface of the earth is composed of the Marine ecosystems and it contains almost 97% of the total amount of water available in the planet. 32% of the net primary production of the world is generated from here. It is different from the freshwater ecosystems as it contains several dissolved components like different types of salt. The level...
Aquatic environmetal toxicology
2 pages (500 words) , Assignment
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...Aquatic environmental toxicology Cost-effective estimation of bioaccumulation potential There are various methods of determining the bioaccumulation potential including, laboratory test, field monitoring and use of models. Among the three methods, the most easily and least expensive is the laboratory test. This method is simple in such a way that the organisms are placed in vessels that contain sediments and superimposing water, and then they are allowed to accrue contaminants from the sediments for a specific period of time. Chemical analysis is usually done on the sediments to establish a chemical data that will be used to compare the toxicity of the result with any...
Assessing risks arising from contamination of the aquatic environment with Bt toxin from GM corn (maize) crop litter in the USA
12 pages (3000 words) , Essay
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...aquatic environment if used without... ? INTRODUCTION Anyone familiar with modern agriculture in the context of crop science is most likely aware of, and acquainted with BT products. Specifically Bacillus Thuringiensis toxin products affecting insects, primarily larva as an internalized pesticide. Throughout the American Midwest, widescale agriculture has reshaped the terrain, and corn (maize) is a predominant product, as is evidenced by the 35 million hectares which are planted annually in the United States. (Tank, 2010) The majority of this corn crop has been genetically modified for pest resistance. (National Agriculture Statistics Service, 2009) Hypothesis: To find out the impact of BT toxins on the...
Week 3: Weather, Climate, Biomes, and Aquatic Environments - Assignments
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Aquatic Environments Introduction Today, environment conservation is mandatory to the government.Regardless to its environmental initiatives, policies and programs, the government cannot achieve maximum protection for the natural environment without the commitment of its citizens. Many individuals are unaware of the current situations, and lack the knowledge of why the environmental is crucial pertaining support to human kind. It is important to stress and educate our population and stress the importance of taking responsibility for one’s surrounding. This paper takes a detail account on the several environmental issues that does explain why environmental consciousness... Weather, Climate, Biomes, and...
Is Hydropower Really Environmentally Friendly?
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...invertebrates and some reservoirs cause emissions of greenhouse gases which cause global warming. Hydropower’s negative impacts... study of several Austrian rivers, artificial fluctuations in water can have an adverse effect on the fish fauna and benthic invertebrates living in those waters. In the investigation, the breakdown of benthic invertebrates and fish fauna was calculated throughout the length of the rivers. The results showed that between 75 and 95 percent of benthic invertebrates’ biomass was found in the first few kilometers of river length. On the other hand, a decrease of between 40 and 60 percent of benthic...
Biological Oxygen Transport
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...invertebrates and some lower vertebrates possess carrier proteins such as hemerythrins and hemocyanins that have actively participated in transport of oxygen, over the whole evolutionary process. As we move towards the complex organisms, we see origination of specific systems involved in oxygen transport. The aquatic insects obtain oxygen through convection. The bulk of water entering the body, uniformly distributes oxygen to various parts of body. The terrestrial insects have developed tracheal system for the transport of oxygen from the surrounding to the body cells. These insects trap a layer of oxygen around their body. This trapped oxygen... Biological Oxygen Transport Oxygen is one of the most...
To summarize and interpret data collected from Dug run on the quality of the water running through the University of Northwester
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...invertebrates were also captured. Planaria and aquatic were the most species recorded. Both species feed on small plants called planktons. Conditions favorable for the plants growth is already discussed above. From this data, it can be drawn further that dug run water is fresh. A lot of emphasis is put on bluntnose minnow specie whose catch drops greatly as indicated... Dug run on the quality of the water running through the of Northwestern Ohio. Dug Run Water Quality Analysis Introduction This work focuses on analysis and interpretation of water quality data- fish species and micro invertebrates collected from dug run stream. Dug run is a physical stream located in Ohio Allen County. Water quality is...
A narrowed aspect of National Park
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...invertebrates. Fish receive contamination from distinctive trophic levels that are managed in both open water and sediment environments. These contaminations accumulate in the food chain, and accumulation in fish would bring about uptake by piscivorous predators including uncovered hawk, osprey, otter, pelican, and mountain bear. Thus, it can be seen that the above mentioned issue poses a great threat to the aquatic life. This ultimately leads to a great percentage of the aquatic life in the Yellowstone stone park to decline in the following years to come. In order to avoid this problem, several solutions and approaches are present that...
Ocean Life and the Impact Of Humans. An overview of the Gulf of Mexico.
6 pages (1500 words) , Research Paper
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...aquatic habitats for both marine fauna and flora. The wide diversity of life in these crucial habitats plays important environmental and economic roles. Marine life is also a major component of various natural processes including hydrological and carbon cycles that play a crucial role in maintaining life in the planet. However, due to the crucial economic importance of aquatic resources, there has been an upsurge of human activities including tourism, mining, fishing and other industries in these habitats. These human activities have regrettably diminished ocean life through unsustainable practices such as overexploitation of the resources and introduction... of pollutants. This paper...
Ecosystem Structure, Function, and Change Paper
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...aquatic... Ecosystem The ecosystem chosen to analyse is a lake which is an environment where various micro organisms, plants, animals, birds, amphibians and fishes live and sustain themselves. This lake is a small water body which is shallow and is a haven for many kinds of animal species. This ecosystem can be looked from a more vivid angle as we get to its structure, functional dynamics, human interaction, chemical interference and species implication. Structure and Functional Dynamics This lake does have abundant terrestrial plants which are unique to the geographical location. The littoral zone gets exposed to sunlight and it penetrates to the sediments on the shores of the lake. This area has aquatic...
Human Biological Systems, Organisation of the Body
4 pages (1000 words) , Assignment
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...Aquatic, mostly marine and body cavity has a hypostome. The hypostome... ? Human Biological Systems, Organization of the body - Human Biological Systems, Organization ofthe body TAQ. 1 Phyllum Characteristics Examples Algae Have a cell structure similar to green plants. They occur in wet areas and contain chloroplasts. No real roots Sea weed, green algae Bryophytes These are small non-vascular plants which lack a specialized conducting system. They do not produce seeds and reproduce by means of haploid spores. For active growth and reproduction, these plants require a moist environment. liverworts, mosses Pteridophytes These are vascular plants which characteristically do not produce flowers and seeds....
LC 50 and LD 50
2 pages (500 words) , Download 1 , Dissertation
...Aquatic animal are for example able to move to deeper levels to avoid spilled oil on water surface. Effects of oil spill on the aquatic environment Oil spill have different degree of effects on plants and animal depending on species and age. Fish Effects of oil spill are a factor of component hydrocarbons that have different effects on fish. Susceptibility to the pollution is for example inversely proportional to age of fish. The degree of saltiness of inhabited water, temperature, availability of nutrients and health condition of a type of fish also determines effects of a spill’s contamination. Effects in fish may also be either temporary... 000009 Meaning of LC 50 and LD 50 LC 50, also known as...
Arctic Plankton Bloom
2 pages (500 words) , Assignment
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...aquatic production is central to all biological processes in an inland aquatic ecosystem. It involves two main processes including primary production and secondary production. Primary production is the process by which living organisms form biomass from energy-poor inorganic materials in the environment with the help of photosynthesis. Under secondary production, the energy-rich organic material or biomass is transformed into other forms through consumption. According to the National Geographic, “biological productivity is defined as the ability of a water body to support life... Arctic Plankton Bloom: Biological Productivity Arctic Plankton Bloom: Biological productivity Biological productivity or...
Black Park in the UK and its macrofossils
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...invertebrates... Black Park in the United Kingdom and its macrofossils Introduction Black Park in Buckinghamshire is prevailed by huge areas of coniferous and mixedwoodland and also contains important conservation areas with national significance. The climate of this area is of extreme type (http://www.buckscc.gov.uk/assets/content/bcc/docs/policy_ plans_ performance/cultural_strategy/22645_41_60.pdf accessed 26 November 2009). In the middle of the Thames valley where the park is situated pine trees, alder, beech and an old lake of the 18th century can also be seen. Woodland and floodplains and the lake catchment area are the natural habitat. Wet woodlands have species including mosses, lichen and inver...
Human Biological Systems, Organisation of the body
4 pages (1000 words) , Assignment
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...Aquatic, mostly marine and body cavity has a hypostome... Human Biological Systems, Organization of the body - Human Biological Systems, Organization ofthe body TAQ. 1 Phyllum Characteristics Examples Algae Have a cell structure similar to green plants. They occur in wet areas and contain chloroplasts. No real roots Sea weed, green algae Bryophytes These are small non-vascular plants which lack a specialized conducting system. They do not produce seeds and reproduce by means of haploid spores. For active growth and reproduction, these plants require a moist environment. liverworts, mosses Pteridophytes These are vascular plants which characteristically do not produce flowers and seeds. Reproduction take...
Motor therapy for children with cerebral palsy (Neurodevelopmental Therapy, Hippotheray , Aquatic Therapy)
3 pages (750 words) , Research Paper
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...aquatic aerobic exercise for cerebral palsy. the intervention was administered 3 times a week for 12 weeks and the intensity was 50-80 percent of heart rate reserve. The outcomes measured were gross motor function reserve, occupational performance reserve and 6-minute walk... ?Motor Therapy for Children with Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is a condition in which the neurologic condition of the brain is static due to some problem in the brain that occurs before the completion of the development of the cerebrum (Batshaw, 2007). The condition is characterized by impairment of the motor system and can present clinically with global mental and physical dysfunction like hemiplegia or quadriplegia that may be...
Crayfish
3 pages (750 words) , Download 0 , Lab Report
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...invertebrates of population approximately 500 dominating freshwater ponds, streams, lakes, swamps and marshes all over the world. Helfrich classify crayfish as organisms that belong to Phylum Arthropoda, Class Crustacea and Order Decapoda (2). The Crayfish body is divided into cephalothorax and abdomen. The fusion of the head and thorax formed one part known as cephalothorax, covered by a carapace. The abdomen has six segments and a fan-like tail called pleiopod. Crayfish... Lab Report on Crustaceans- Crayfish Introduction Animals dominate various biomes of the world. Therefore, habitat determines the capability of the animal to maintain internal body temperature despite fluctuations in the...
Ecology
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...aquatic organisms like fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, invertebrates etc inhabit the mangroves of Florida (Enright & Pegram, 2005). Everglades ecosystem is one of the largest freshwater marshes in the world and covers the entire Lake Okeechobee along with its tributaries. But most... Exploring the Effects of Crop Rotation in Non-sugarcane Growing Years on Local Egret Populations Affiliation Author note with more information about affiliation, research grants, conflict of interest and how to contact Exploring the Effects of Crop Rotation in Non-sugarcane Growing Years on Local Egret Populations Introduction: Ecosystem is defined as a “dynamic complex” of living things like plants, animals, ...
Diversity Of Phylum Chordata
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
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...invertebrates or vertebrates. Invertebrates are the animals which do not have cranium (brain box) and back bone while vertebrates may have back bone and cranium. All known vertebrates are broadly grouped in the phylum Chordata. This grouping takes into consideration a number of factors known as diagnostic factors. Therefore for an animal to be considered a chordate it must have or it had the following diagnostic features: Notochord: a long flexible rod of cartilage that runs along the body Pharyngeal gill slits: Are the holes or perforations along the neck or throat. In fish they are modified to form gills... DIVERSITY OF PHYLUM CHORDATA Phylum overview All living animals can be ified either as...
Profile Toxicology
13 pages (3250 words) , Term Paper
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...aquatic or terrestrial food chain. Older organisms tend to contain higher body burdens of Pb. In aquatic ecosystems, concentrations of Pb are usually highest in benthic organisms and algae, and lowest in the upper trophic level predators... INTRODUCTION LEAD Physical and chemical properties Lead (Pb), a metal with an atomic weight 207.2 and atomic number 82, is soft bluish-gray acid-soluble element, exhibiting a bright luster when freshly cut, but tarnishes in moist air to form a dull gray coating. The metal element belongs to Group 14 (IV A) of the periodic table and has a density of 11.3437 g cm-3 at 20º C. It is highly ductile and very malleable, resistant to corrosion and has a low melting point...
Commercial Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico
10 pages (2500 words) , Research Paper
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...invertebrates, fishes and different types of algae. Green algae are important primary producers in aquatic ecosystems providing nourishment to animals in higher trophic levels such as fish. Mangrove forests provide favorable breeding grounds for aquatic animals in addition to protecting the shoreline from strong winds and waves (Weber, Townsend and Bierce, 1992, pp 32-37). Oyster reefs provide suitable habitats for oysters especially in Alabama. Moreover, hyper saline marshes are suitable habitats for some oysters that are specifically adapted to live in salty conditions. Other important ecological features in the Gulf of Mexico include... ? Topic: Commercial Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico Lecturer:...
Solid Waste Management.
6 pages (1500 words) , Research Paper
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...aquatic life. It may cause fish kills and death of aquatic plants and invertebrates. It prevents solar energy from penetrating the water and reaching the autotrophic animals. It contaminates the water and lessens the dissolved oxygen available to aquatic animals. They have chemicals that cause death to these animals. For example, gasoline can attach onto the gills of fishes, preventing them to breathe. What is more bothersome is that gasoline, which is liquid, is harder to clean up than simple solid... ?ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT STRATEGY The Concepts behind the Strategy The principle of source reduction suggests that the reduction of wastes produced can be achieved by using the minimum amount of resources...
Anthropogenic Disturbance on Benthic Communitiy
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...invertebrates and their drift in eight streams within Northern Indonesia where rainforest streams and oceans are disturbed by anthropogenic activities. The benthic community studied were that found in Papua New Guinea and South East Asia and in general not predatory. The results indicated that the benthic communities were strongly affected by channelisation and conversion of forests to agriculture. Some benthic species were found to show drifting activities at night showing some sort of community reactions to changes in the external environment. Arasaki et al (2004) suggests that anthropogenic... The Effects of Anthropogenic Disturbance on Benthic Community Structure and Diversity This research...
Synthetic studies towards the marine natural product cylindrospermopsin the causative agent in freshwater toxic blooms
6 pages (1500 words) , Literature review
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...invertebrates, bacteria, phytoplankton and protozoans as it seek to identify... ? Synthetic studies towards the marine natural product cylindrospermopsin; the causative agent in freshwater toxic blooms Cylindrospermopsinin (C YN) is gradually being recognized as of the most global importance of the freshwater algal toxins. The rapid increase in CYN producers in temperate zones is yielding concern on the impact of this toxin to human, as well as environmental risk and health risks across the contents. Since 2000, there are several studies that have demonstrated the capacity for Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) to bio-accummulate especially in freshwater organism. This report synthesizes the current information on ...
Anthropogenic Impact on Mangrove Ecosystems
6 pages (1500 words) , Term Paper
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...invertebrate fauna such as penaeid shrimps, spiny lobster and over 200 species of fish threatened globally. Human activities cause disturbance of the mangroves. Such activities include: 1 Overexploitation or unsustainable extraction of the mangrove tress and fauna Man continues to harvest mangrove trees for fuel wood, poles, charcoal, and timber for construction purposes. Moreover, mangrove bark is used for commercial production of tannin (Alfaro, 1087). However, small scale and selective extraction of mangrove pose a little challenge on the entire ecosystem... Anthropogenic impact on mangrove ecosystems Mangroves form one of the most important ecosystems in the world. Itcomprises of salt tolerant tree...
Stream Lab Report
4 pages (1000 words) , Lab Report
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...invertebrates in water is important because they are a link to the aquatic food chain, have diverse sensitivity to pollution and is a relatively cheap method for analysis of the stream quality. Additionally, the macroinvertebrate diversity provides useful information on the long term quality of the stream unlike water analysis which provides... ?Stream paper 0 INTRODUCTION 1 Background information Streams and rivers have been under extreme pressure from anthropogenic sources which have consequently affected the river or stream quality and thus terminologies such as ecological integrity, stream condition and river health have been coined to describe the status of river ecosystems in response to human...
Nereis succinea
44 pages (11000 words) , Essay
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...aquatic organisms: soluble molecules, including steroid-based fish sex pheromones (Sorensen and Stacey, 1999) and large, polar molecules, including the alarm pheromone of the sea anemone (Howe and Sheikh, 1975). Alternatively, various marine invertebrates use polypeptides as chemical cues (Zimmer and Butman, 2000). As established previously, most marine organisms manage chemical cue compounds in exchange of data as well as to manage essential activities (Wyatt, 2003), including reproduction, sperm activation and attraction, predator-prey interactions, larval settlement and metamorphosis, homing and the management of social hierarchies (Wyatt, 2003). Sex pheromones considered chemical... ? Introduction:...
Environmental Health Science - Reducing Air Pollution through the use of Oxygenated Gasoline
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...aquatic organisms at concentrations of 57-> 1000 mg/l (invertebrates), and 388-2600 mg/l (vertebrates). Developmental effects in medaka (Oryzias latipes) were not observed up to a concentration of 480 mg/l, and all fish hatched and were found to be performing feeding and swimming in a normal manner. Bacterial assays peformed proved to be most sensitive to toxicity to Salmonella typhimurium measured at 7.4 mg/l within 48 h. when observed for 5 days micro algae, showed decreased growth at 2400 and 4800 mg/l. This study concludes that MTBE does not appear to bioaccumulate in fish and is rapidly excreted... Environmental Health Science - Reducing Air Pollution through the use of Oxygenated Gasoline Use the ...
Aquaculture
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aquatic cultivation caters to almost half of the yearly global fisheries production which is 120 million metric tones as per 2004 fact sheets. Amazingly, the species that had the highest production bulk was Pacific cupped Oyster having production number as large as 4.4 million tones! Carps followed Oysters in terms of production volume. Finfish comprises half of overall aquatic production; aqua plants comprise one-fourth of production and the rest is shrimps, crabs, mollusc and prawns. Carps, Oysters... 1 November 2008 Sub Marine Resources, Native Oyster The life cycle, exploitation and use of Native oyster . The aquaculture has rendered us with apotpourri of species including animals and vegetation....
Marine pollotion in central New South Wales estuaries in australia
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...aquatic animals. The other form of pollution is oil which greatly affects the marine animals. Preventive measures should be enacted to prevent pollution of the New South Wales estuaries as discussed in the essay. Marine pollution... is based on distribution of sediment contamination of metals and physic-chemical variables that is turgidity, Ph, temperature and salinity (Wolanski, 2011:17). Their position directly downstream increases the chances of pollution because of the agricultural activities. As earlier stated, the proximity of man settlement near the estuaries has greatly resulted to the pollution of the estuaries. Pollution and contamination of the estuaries has resulted to decrease of...
Acid Rain
7 pages (1750 words) , Research Proposal
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...aquatic wildlife. When rainwater mixed with sulphur or ammonia (as two relevant examples) falls to the earth, the acid rain changes the pH of ponds, rivers and lakes, altering the water’s suitability to sustain aquatic life (Chautauqua Dept of Health, 2). Certain fish and invertebrates require a specific pH in order to live and reproduce, which could potentially create a situation in which reproductive systems are affected... HERE YOUR HERE YOUR HERE HERE Acid Rain: Definition, Impact and Potential Solutions Acid rain appears to be one of the most invasive problems facing contemporary society today. Acid rain occurs when, through a variety of industrial pollutants or natural phenomenon, the pH level of...
Wetlands
7 pages (1750 words) , Research Proposal
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...Invertebrates as dragon flies and mosquitoes live under the water while amphibians like frogs will use the wetlands to hide from the winter. Other reptiles, mammals and birds have not only made wetlands their habitats but also a breeding site (Russo, 2008). The wetlands act as a sponge in trapping runoff water during a rainy storm and as the water is released slowly it is filtered thus removing toxic substances. Water will move through the plants and the small spaces in the soil allowing nutrients to be absorbed while pollutants will be trapped. Although seventy five percent of the earth surface is covered by water, there is only three percent... Supervisor Submitted WETLANDS RESEARCH PROPOSAL TABLE OF...
Catchment Health and Management
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...invertebrates, Journal of Applied Ecology, 30, pp. 696-705. Walker, D., and A. Johnson. 1996. Delivering flexible decision support for environmental management: A case study in integrated catchment management. Aust. J. Environ. Manage. 3(3): 174-188. Wiley, M.J., Kohler, S.L. & Seelbach, P.W. (1997) Reconciling landscape and local views of aquatic communities: lessons from Michigan trout streams, Freshwater Biology, 37, pp. 133-148.... in many parts of the world marks a shift from the application of reach-based engineering principles towards an adoption of ecosystem-centred, adaptive and participatory approaches to river management. From a biophysical viewpoint, this represents recognition of...
Ohio's Wetlands
5 pages (1250 words) , Term Paper
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...invertebrates such as freshwater shrimp, crayfish, and clams require the habitats provided by swamps. Many rare species, such as the endangered American Crocodile depend on these ecosystems as well.” (p.3) Evasive Plants in Ohio’s Wetlands Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) says that there are nearly 3,000 species... Marshes and Wetlands in the of Ohio The United s Environmental Protection Agency defines wetlands as “lands where saturation with water is the dominant factor determining the nature of soil development and the types of plant and animal communities living in the soil and on its surface” (p. 2). There are approximately five types of the wetlands in the State of Ohio. They are swamp,...
DDT: Good Riddance or a Bad Rap?
9 pages (2250 words) , Essay
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...aquatic resources such as fish and sea food. Nonetheless, agricultural products such as cereals and grains may also be an important source. DDT is instantly metabolized into a stable and similarly toxic compound DDE. Both DDT and DDE is lipid soluble and stored in adipose tissue of human beings and animals and primarily secreted by urine and breast milk. Nonetheless, it is an established fact that effects caused... ? DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) is a well-known controversial organo-chlorine insecticide. Originally prepared in 1873, its insecticidal properties were discovered later in 1939. It was used extensively worldwide, for the successful elimination of insect pests in agriculture sector and ...
Pollution
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Aquatic animals may gather by direct exposure of these hydrocarbons. Liver, gonads and brains in benthic fish like catfish are mostly affected by high concentration of hydrocarbons... ?Pollution Pollution is caused when air, water or soil gets contaminated by discharge of harmful substances. Pollution causes imbalance in the ecosystem by causing harm and discomfort to living organisms. Pollution can be prevented if resources like raw materials, water and energy are utilized in proper way and harmful materials are substituted by materials which are less hazardous (“What is Pollution Prevention”, n.d.). By steps taken for eliminating toxic substances from production process and by diminishing production of ...
Cylyndrospermospis (CYN) Algae
20 pages (5000 words) , Essay
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...aquatic hinterlands, seafood harvested from there may present health hazards to consumers. Such toxicity hazards from seafood are recognized internationally when they are from marine algae (diatoms and dinoflagellates), but nowadays few risk assessments for Cylindrospermopsin in seafood have been conducted. This paper estimates the risk from Cylindrospermopsin contaminated seafood, and provides strategies for safe human consumption. The paper analyses the risk of Cylindrospermopsin toxicity in human... ? Cylyndrospermospis Area of study Cyanobacteria (or blue-green algae) are very abundant in fresh and saline waters worldwide that produce toxin called Cylindrospermopsin. When these toxins are present in...
Komodo dragons and their behaviour
14 pages (3500 words) , Essay
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...aquatic life to a complete terrestrial life. However, some reptiles have gone back to stay in the water and may sometimes resurface on land for a short while. The fact that reptiles’ eggs resistant to water and hard waterproof skins mean that they can afford to live in places where animals in the amphibian category cannot manage. Currently, the number of recognized reptile species exceeds 8,700 with large majorities belonging to the Squamata group. This group comprises of snakes, lizards and other worm-like amphisbaenians (Nelson 357). Fig 2. Some facts on Komodo Dragons (Watts et al. 1023). As noted from the foregone discussion, reptiles exist in various sizes,...
Te Uku - wind farm project
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates and some mammals like feral cats and pigs (Ecological Assessment, 2007). This somehow means that there is basically no negative relationship between the wind farm and the animals in it. However, turbine 5 of the project somehow disturbs national heritage. Te Tihi o... Te Uku Wind Farm Project Teacher               Te Uku Wind Farm Project Introduction (Executive Summary of the Project) Te Uku is considered the fourth New Zealand wind farm constructed by Meridian Energy in 2011, after the construction of the 55-turbine Te Apiti wind farm in 2004, the 29-turbine White hill wind farm in 2007, and the 62-turbine wind farm in West Wind in 2009. This 28-turbine wind farm...
Organic chemistry
14 pages (3500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...aquatic creatures, both vertebrates and invertebrates. As a grave hazard to human health, PCBs may lead to dysfunction of liver, carcinogenic effect, dizziness, and dermatitis. (c) Give a brief account... ?Section A a) Explain, with examples, why singlet oxygen is important in the degradation of organic molecules in the environment. Unlike the oxidative properties of the ground-state oxygen, singlet oxygen which by nature works in its excited state is capable of degrading molecules through photosensitization. A singlet oxygen is typically produced by a photosensitizer pigment with which such element facilitates the sun’s detrimental impact upon organic matters in significant number. Concrete instances...
A Multi-proxy Reconstruction of the Late Quaternary Site at Deeping St. James, Lincolnshire
12 pages (3000 words) , Coursework
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...aquatic plant exhibits rhizomatous network of roots. During unfavorable conditions, the rhizomes transform into resting buds. These buds... A Multi-proxy Reconstruction of the Late Quaternary Site at Deeping St. James, Lincolnshire DeepingSt. James is a former pond in very close proximity to the modern River Welland. However, it formed after the abandoning of a channel by the river during the ipswichian interglacial. Often climate change attributes to the changes of river behavior. The ipswichian interglacial presented temperatures that were higher than the norm in the British region. After the river abandoned its former channel, deposition started. Previous proxies have dated the event to over 120000...
Malham Field
38 pages (9500 words) , Lab Report
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...invertebrates’ hosts while the adult is widespread in small mammals (Georgiev et al., nd). Cestodes occurring in small mammals fall in the order Cyclophyllidea with the Catenotaeniidae family having host range limited to rodents (Quentin, 1994). Various literature sources have reported on the influence of weight, sex and age on the helminth fauna in infesting O. cuniculus (Dudzinski and Mykytowcz, 1963; Dunsmore, 1966a, b, c; Boag and Kolb, 1989). Another rodent which can be found in Malham region is wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) which harbours a variety of nematodes, trematodes... ? Malham Field report 9th April Summary This report sought to determine the parasite fauna inhabiting two of the common...
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