Aristotle
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...Aristotle What are the foundations of Aristotle’s theory of art? Aristotle’s views on art are the conglomeration of secular and spiritual approaches in tandem with the concepts of western philosophy. According to him, art is the honest form of representation of life. It is the combination of imagination and imitation by observing the life from the practical point of view. He articulates a definite method of evaluating art in his writing. The true object of art must represent some definite perspective or object of life, according to him. An artist gets inspiration from nature and the ever-changing world around him, he confronts new situations and develops innovative... Essay, Philosophy Topic:...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle is an ancient Greek philosopher whose works have been very influential in modern dayscience and philosophy. Aristotle rose to prominence after the death of his master, Plato. Among his legendary works include his writings on ethics. Aristotle’s ethics represented a significant shift from traditional ethics taught by his predecessors Socrates and Plato (Pakaluk and Giles, 2010). Nicomachean ethics is a collection of ten different books written by Aristotle on various topics in ethics. Also known as Aristotelian ethics, Nicomachean ethics has had a huge impact on modern day philosophy and law as well as influencing many modern day thinkers. Nicomachean... Nicomachean Ethics Nicomachean Ethics...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle's Poetics, the character projected by a speaker, artist, etc. Thus in Aristotle's logic, the process of establishing a general proposition by induction (seeing the univers.il in the particular) or deductive reasoning in which a conclusion is derived from two premises is syllogism or Epagoge. In traditional logic, a syllogism is an inference in which one proposition (the conclusion) follows of necessity from two others (known as premises). In his Posterior Analytics, Aristotle sets out what seems to be a rather stringent method of acquiring scientific knowledge and understanding (episteme). Aristotle argues that genuine... Epagoge is Greek for argument from induction. .... By extension, in...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle. Aristotle was born in Stigarus, Greece on 386 B.C. (Kemerling). He was a student of Plato who was a protégé of Socrates. During his lifetime as a philosopher he made contributions to the fields of logic, metaphysics, mathematics, biology, botany, ethics, politics, agriculture, ethics, politics, agriculture, dance, and theater (Iep). Aristotle was a very talented writer. Altogether he wrote more than 200 treatises. One of his biggest accomplishment as was the classification of knowledge into disciplines such as mathematics, biology and ethics... In the history of mankind there have been individuals that have impacted our society in a positive a manner due to their wisdom. One of these men is...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle, a good person would perform her/his duties not for the sake of another person but for the sake of happiness. The act of virtue is thus, not merely one of charity but is also directed towards the fulfillment of one’s own desires. This however, does not mean that one does not experience difficulties while dispensing with goodness. Amaly would need to exercise a great deal of restraint while she is at her job. At every point in her work, she would have to remind herself of the discipline and effort that is required... Virtue The person described, Amaly Yossef, is able to achieve the Aristotelian notion of virtue through adhering to certain s and also by doing so voluntarily. According to...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle established the basic principles of mathematics, distinguishing between the axiom and the postulate. Example: ‘Things equal to the same thing are equal to one another.’ (If 3 x 4 = 6 x 2, and 8 + 4 = 6 x 2, then 3 x 4 = 8 + 4) Abstract The son of a doctor, Aristotle lived and worked at a time when knowledge was starting to branch into different disciplines. Well educated, his fine language skills furnished him with the tools for analysis, calculation, interpretation and reckoning. He defined the basics of logic, upon which the building blocks of science and mathematics have been placed. Aristotelian logic is the mainstay of the methods used to arrive at logical, workable... February...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle According to the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP), Aristotle was born in 384 BCE on the “coast of Thrace” in Macedonia. His father was a doctor in the king’s court, so Aristotle had a privileged life from the beginning. He was educated in the court and at the age of 17 he went to Athens to continue his education. There he learned from Plato, Socrates’ famous student. As a philosophy student, Aristotle, at first, absorbed all he could from his teacher and mentor, but in maturing as a student and thinker, he began to break away from Plato’s ideas, especially his thoughts on the Theory of Forms, and shape opposite views than those of his teacher through exercising his own... month year...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle Aristotle, the great philosopher was born in Stagira in north Greece. He was first trained in medicine as hisfather Nichomachus was the court physician to the Macedonian royal family. He was later sent to Athens to study philosophy under the great Greek philosopher Plato. Aristotle was a brilliant student of Plato though he opposed some of the ideas of Plato later in his teachings. After the death of Plato, he left Athens and spent time travelling and learning new areas of science and thoughts. When he returned to Macedonia in 338, he became the tutor of Alexander the great. Later, he established his own school named ‘Lyceum’ in...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle essay Introduction: With the mention of “The highest good and the end toward which all human activity is directed is happiness, which can be defined as continuous contemplation of eternal and universal truth,” (Aristotle, n. p.)Aristotle reaches the threshold of spirituality but stumbles there. He is unable to cross the final hurdle to the land of the divine, where bliss alone reigns. It is the conflict –free land of peace, with no secular dualities. The question is how to reach the level of eternal and universal truth? Aristotle’s ethical theory is incomplete and creates a vacuum. How can an ethical man know about the correctness of a moral decision? His theory... Essay, Philosophy Topic:...
ARISTOTLE
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...Aristotle Introduction Aristotle was the diligent of stalwart Plato. The school of Philosophy that Aristotle preached was known as the Lyceum. The works of Aristotle was diverse across various fields of study. Aristotle did not believe in the separation of the rich from the poor that existed in the Spartan civilization. He believed that the existing system of the allocation of land in Athens was not acceptable. The prevalent system of communal meals also drew a line between the rich and the poor. Aristotle’s Idea of Citizenship and State and the Government Aristotle based...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle has to say about nous? Aristotle introduced nous and epagoge as parts of the scientific procedure and, thus vital components in obtaining scientific knowledge. Particularly, they figured in area of rhetorical reasoning and inquiry. Epagoge, in Aristotle’s theoretical inquiry, is the inductive procedure... Of what procedure are nous and epagogē parts? What is the function of that procedure? What is the role of nous and epagogē within that process? What is nous? What is epagogē? (You do not have to answer the last two questions in that order.) How does epagogē work—that is, what is the process by which it produces its results? What are its results? What is distinctive and problematic in what...
Aristotle
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...ARISTOTLE The philosophical concepts, ideologies and writings of Aristotle have influenced a plethora of wide-ranging s anddisciplines, both in a positive manner where Aristotle has been lauded for the representation of his beliefs, and also in a disapproving way where the thinker’s ideologies have suffered a backlash from critics and commentators. Kelsen (1937) critically notes that the influence of Aristotelian philosophy has varied in its magnitude and lasting impact. While, the thinker’s stance on politics and ethics is still scrutinized upon to this day, enjoying unparalleled discussion and assessments, his once unassailable logic in the arena of sciences has been greatly... ? PHILOSOPHY ESSAY...
Aristotle
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...Aristotles Three Persuasive Proofs There are three different distinctions identified by Aristotle. These are ethos, pathos, and logos. These three proofs are used on daily basis to make effective argumentative writing. According to Professor Jeanne Fahnestock the first one is “Ethos forms the root of ethikas means credibility or ethical appeal, it is simply “the state of being”, the soul, the mind and shapes and forms of a person. In this appeal,” One of the problems of argument is to project an impression to the reader that you are someone worth listening to, in other words making yourself as author into an authority on the subject of the paper, as well as someone who is likable and worthy... ...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle (12) defines happiness to be a measure of good life and good action. While it is understandable how happiness is equated to good life, the concept of ‘good’ often remains subjective. For a peasant who has been enduring months of labor, an abundant harvest defines a good life. Yet this may not mean anything to a powerful landowner who has already been living in abundance all his life. In the same sense, it is common to think that the children... ?With the recent tragedies that have daunted the world, as though attesting to the prophecies claiming that the end is drawing near, it seems worthwhile to contemplate on how well life has been lived and to consider possible changes that can still be...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle The determination of human behavior and how they are acquired by individuals is very controversial. While certain scientist believe that hereditary is the sole contributor to the behavior and personality of individuals, other philosophers have often disagreed with this idea stating that it is the environment that determines an individual behavior. The nature theory asserts that people’s behaviors or influenced by their genetic makeup or their genetic predispositions. On the other hand, nurture theorists believe that people behave in a certain manner because they are taught to behave so. This is what is known as nurture theory of human behavior. However, others have agreed with both...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle was a polymath without a shadow of a doubt. He was a great philosopher; he was also a theologian, in addition to this he was also a literary critic. “Poetics” written by Aristotle define several important literary elements and it also serves as a benchmark for all the other literary critics during the time of Aristotle. His definition of a tragedy was widely accepted by writers and they tried to match his description, Aristotle wrote in his poetics that the tragic hero must feel excessive pain and he must undergo excessive suffering, he also wrote that not everyone can be a tragic hero. A person of great... ?Client’s Here: 27 December Polymath refers to a person who is a man of many talents;...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle’s Courage Much of how the West thinks about itself and about science was formulated by the words of our earliest known philosophers. These would be Socrates, whose thought was recorded by Plato; Plato, who took the words of Socrates and developed his own system of thought; and Aristotle, who, like his teacher Plato, took the words of his mentor and developed his own way of looking at the world. Aristotle has been particularly influential in the development of mankind as he examined the elements that comprised a virtuous man and thus, by extension, a virtuous and just society. One of the primary elements of a virtuous man is that he also be a courageous man. Despite the fact... ...
Aristotle
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...Aristotle suggested that the followers of Pythagoras and the followers of Plato came up with very similar accountsof the causes of things, and that their accounts had many problems in common. He explained the Pythagorean school of though by elaborating, "they regarded number as both a material and formal principle". On the other hand, he elucidates the Platonian version by stating, "They employed two causes, that of essence and of material; for the forms are the cause of the essence in everything else, and the One is the cause of it in the forms". Basically, where he drew a comparison between the two, was by equating their attempt to explain concepts and constructs... Question In Metaphysics Book...
ARISTOTLE
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...Aristotle: Generosity is a metric that is determined by the will of service and deliverance rather than expectations. It is no generosity when a person does a noble deed that is limited to him only. This deliverance could be in form of tangible products and pecuniary possessions. To the contrary there are those who are marked by miserliness or spendthrift towards their own pursuits without regard to welfare and services of other people. This is termed despicable and root of non service towards the mankind and welfare. The spendthrift factor does not stand as the only variable identifying a vice or non benevolent act, rather a generic representation of the overall context...
Aristotle Quote
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...Aristotle) For Aristotle moral values such as temperance, justice and courage are part of an individual's social behavior and should be dealt with as complex social skills that should be mastered in order to achieve success. For an individual the satisfaction of a good life comes mostly from the relationship with the society and the individuals who form it. Life becomes more fruitful if an individual applies moral principles in each particular situation, thus learning how to skillfully master some general principles and sharpen his/her sense of practicality. Moral virtue represents for Aristotle 'the golden way' that unites and tempers two extremes... "Moral virtue is the mean between two extremes"...
Aristotle eudaimonia
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...Aristotle eudaimonia Aristotle eudaimonia is a concept that has been developed to refer to the achievement of the highest good for humans, which in other respects has been termed as the achievement of happiness for humans. However, when assessed closely, Aristotle eudaimonia is a concept that applies to the achievement of human’s good spirits (Aristotle, 2004). This is because; according to Aristotle eudaimonia, the achievement of the highest human good is not achieved as virtues per se, but through the practice of the virtue. Thus, to achieve eudaimonia, a person must keep practicing the good things, which may entail seeking to excel in one’s career, having good friends and also eating well... ...
Aristotle,nz
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...Aristotle Comparison between Excellence of Character and Excellence of Thought Aristotle defined excellence as the thought of developing, over time, incorruptible values. Aristotle sincerely believed that the achievement of excellence was something that would depend on the individual’s habits. Essentially, a person’s acquisition of virtue was dependent on perfecting his or her mental or psychological reaction to different circumstances. According to Aristotle, in order to attain happiness, human beings would have to achieve excellence of character as well as thought. For Aristotle, the concept of ‘excellence of character’ includes the elements of practical reason as well as emotion... . The...
Aristotle & Hume
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...Aristotle & Hume Hume argues that reason cannot combat a passion. How do you think Aristotle would respond? How would you continue thisconversation? Introduction Hume is a philosopher who has interpreted passion and reason in a distinctive manner than other philosophers. He believes that passion is an innate feeling and reason has no real connection with it. Hume considers that, passion is a moralistic feeling and has no bond with reasoning. He argues that passion as a strong human feeling arises out of lustful nature in person. Passion is a feeling whinchats no boundaries, if aroused naturally and authentically in an individual. Hume understands the concepts and elements of life, as he... Philosophy -...
Aristotle & Hume
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...Aristotle & Hume Hume argues that reason cannot combat a passion. How do you think Aristotle would respond? How would you continue this conversation? Introduction Hume is a philosopher who interpreted passion and reason in a distinctive manner than other philosophers. He believes that passion is an innate feeling and reason has no real connection with it. Hume considers that passion is a moralistic feeling and has no bond with reasoning. He argues that passion as a strong human feeling arises out of lustful nature in person. Passion is a feeling which has no boundaries, if aroused naturally and authentically in an individual. Hume understands the concepts and elements of life as he... Philosophy -...
Philosophy--Aristotle
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...Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics Topic Human Good Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is the first treatise of ethics, and what standards man ought to live, in recorded Western philosophy to date. In the Ethics, Aristotle defines ethics as the art of living well or living with excellence. As opposed to later philosophical treatises in Western discourse, the Nicomachean Ethics is not an attempt of morals of what man should and should not do, and what those “dos and don’ts” are, but rather an explanation or model for self-cultivation of ones own virtues and excellence. To necessitate this, Aristotle must define the conception of the good for humanity, and what sort or actions... Seminar in Ancient Philosophy...
Aristotle rhetoric
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...ARISTOTLE RHETORIC The art of communication is effective in convincing the audience in any situation and this ability defines who an orator is.In public speaking, the connection between ideas, emotions and perception work together to influence the direction of success for any form of interpersonal interaction. Aristotle is one of the global icons who advanced the idea of rhetoric as a science although it should not absolutely be considered as such. To make a clear understanding of rhetoric and its use in the present day political process, it would be important to identify its three species as defined by Aristotle. An overall belief of Aristotle in respect to rhetoric is that it can help... in...
Aristotle Democracy
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...Aristotle Democracy Aristotle was a historical advocate for moderation who praised self-control and the social spread of knowledge to improve the well-being and mental capacity of men. When speaking of virtue, democracy as the best form of government implies that government will take into consideration knowledge-sharing and hold back no truths from the general population. However, to this end, the need for citizens to be reformed and sophisticated in terms of ethical behavior and rationality are important to gain any kind of meaningful governmental structure that promotes equality and truth. The higher class citizens, usually those who control and regulate governmental... HERE HERE YOUR HERE HERE...
Aristotle & Boethius
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...Aristotle think that actions done out of fear might be excused but not actions done from some other kind of response? For Aristotle, the actions that are committed as a result of some emotional excitement, especially fear, are considered as not unlike a physical handicap that eventually excuse the actor from any culpability. This is part of his wider discourse on what is morally virtuous, wherein he famously explained how a person’s moral quality is characterized by how he responds to pleasure and pain. This is crucial for Aristotelian readers because this effectively enables them to discriminate characters better simply by examining his or her choices instead of the actions... . In this...
Plato vs. Aristotle
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...Aristotle Plato vs. Aristotle 1 Plato vs. Aristotle Introduction The beliefs of Plato and Aristotle fluctuate on a lot of matters. One of the most significant objects to observe is their conflicting view on moral hypothesis. One can discover many ends of disagreement amid the ethical conjectures of Plato and Aristotle. Though, one of the most vital points is their contrary outlook on the human function "ergon" and its part in ethics. This paper will look at two dissimilar arguments about the human function and evaluate the dissimilar objectives of each. Plato vs. Aristotle Aristotle disproves Plato's Theory of Ideas on three essential... Plato vs....
On Dreams by Aristotle
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...Aristotle No one in the world is unaware of the of Aristotle. He was unanimously amongst the most popular ancient philosophers and mathematicians of the world. He wrote on almost all of the subjects and topics of the universe and interpreted many phenomena according to human psychology and nature. He described every aspect of life like morals, scientific logic, politics, music etc and made a comprehensive research on all of these. Although many of his writings are not found in today’s world, yet we can get a lot of knowledge through the ones which are available to us. Among other phenomena of life, Aristotle interpreted dreams too. Early Greek impression of dreams... was that they are from...
Aristotle's Theory
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...Aristotle against Epiphenomenalism In the modern scientific knowledge, epiphenomenalism is a teaching, considering the mind and consciousness as phenomena, which only accompany physiological processes (Robinson). Epiphenomenalism suggests that mental processes do not play an active role in a causal link defining various physiological states. The mind-body problem is being examined through the denial of the significance of mental processes in the physiological functioning of the body. Analyzing the philosophy of Aristotle, one can argue that he does not support epiphenomenalism. Despite the fact that Aristotle believes that the soul exists...
Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics
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...Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle’s best known work on ethics, The Nicomachean Ethics (350 B.C.E has been one of the most essential philosophical treatises on ethical issues for the last several centuries. Significantly, the Book VI of The Nicomachean Ethics specifically deals with the intellectual virtue which is the continuation of the discussion on the moral virtues, covering Books II to V. In fact, Aristotle makes an essential distinction between moral virtues and intellectual virtues in Book II and the former refers to virtues learned through habit and practice while the latter refers to virtues learned through instruction. Therefore, it is essential to realize that the Book VI... ...
Virture according to Aristotle
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...Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics Based on book 2 of the Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle, virtue in the Ethics specially agrees with human excellence. There are 2 kinds of virtue. These are the moral virtue and the intellectual virtue. Moral virtues are learned through routine and constant practice. On the other hand, intellectual virtues are learned through instructions (Payne). Virtues are said to have its place in the soul. In the absence of virtue, a person cannot be happy. Therefore, an unhappy person is missing something in his soul. According to Aristotle, the soul is consisted of 3 components. These components are a person’s passion, faculty and state of character. However... Virtue According to...
Aristotle Greek Philosopher History
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...Aristotle Greek Philosopher History The Greek philosopher Aristotle was born in 384 BC in Stagira which is a town in Northern Greece. His father was Nicomachus and he was both a doctor and friend of King Amyntas of Macedon. His mother was Phaestis and belonged to a rich family. He moved to Athens at the age of 22 to study philosophy under the guidance of Plato. It was also possible that he learnt philosophy in his early years in Stagira after reading some philosophical dialogues written by Plato. There is no evidence to support these theories and it is not precisely known what he had found in Athens. Plato was a famous intellectual person and he had...
Aristotle on Moral Responsibility
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...Aristotle on Moral Responsibility Introduction The work of Aristotle is given great attention because after Plato he continued with the foundations of western philosophy. It is not possible to read an introduction of western philosophy without the mention of Aristotle. The discussion of moral responsibility composes a significant part of Aristotle’s philosophy. He discusses morality on the basis of voluntary and involuntary actions. He also believes that virtues are of two kinds, intellectual and moral virtue. Apart from involuntary and voluntary criteria, there is another criterion that Aristotle uses for moral responsibility. A person is not morally... Inserts His/her Inserts Inserts Grade (14, 07,...
The Politics by Aristotle
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...Aristotle - book - The Politics One of the most influential and enduring works of political philosophy in the history of humanity, Aristotle’s Politics is generally considered as the continuation of the Nicomachean Ethics and both of them together deal with the philosophy of human affairs. This work by Aristotle is known for the great philosopher’s discussion of the various aspects of politics based on the Greek city-state, otherwise known as polis. It is essential to realize that Politics is one of the classics of the history of political philosophy and it keeps the same grand mood all through it. An understanding of the historical...
Plato and Aristotle Theories
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...Aristotle Theories According to Melchert the term universal means a general concept (11). The nature of universals is argued by Plato and Aristotle (Greek Philosophers) in different ways. Plato argued that all things or a property have a universal form. This form can be related to other things. For example, when we look at an orange, we analyze the particular orange and a universal form of an orange. Moreover, when we place the orange near a plate, we speak of both of them been next to each other. Furthermore, he also argued the existence of “unistantiated universals”. These are universal forms that do not relate to a particular thing. When we speak that there is a particular good... in...
The politics by Aristotle
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...Aristotle In discussing the concept of the slave, Aristotle makes a clear distinction between those individuals who are considered slaves as a result of one nation conquering another and those who ‘natural slaves.’ Physically, Aristotle says the slave is constructed in such a way as to make him suitable for the tasks required by manual labor while the master is given a more upright carriage suitable for military life, other civic duties and managerial occupations. However, Aristotle recognizes many intellectual and spiritual differences between the master and the slave as well, making it possible for those naturally built to be slaves to have the spirit of a master and those built... The Politics by...
Analytical paper on Aristotle
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...ARISTOTLE Aristotle was born in Stagira in north Greece, as the son of Nichomachus, the court physician to the Macedonian royal family. He was trained first in medicine, and then in 367 he was sent to Athens to study philosophy with Plato. He stayed at Plato's Academy until about 347. Though a brilliant pupil, Aristotle opposed some of Plato's teachings, and when Plato died, Aristotle was not appointed head of the Academy. After leaving Athens, Aristotle spent some time traveling, and possibly studying biology, in Asia Minor (now Turkey) and its islands. He returned to Macedonia in 338 to tutor Alexander...
Plato and Aristotle
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...Aristotle: differences and similarities Plato (428-347 B.C was a pupil of Socrates, the philosopher who was condemned to death, for publicly expounding his ideas, by drinking hemlock ordered by the Greek state of the time. Socrates did not plead for mercy but drank the hemlock and died. Plato was Socrates' pupil and was 29 years old at the time of his teacher's death. Socrates did not write down his ideas. We owe it to Plato who wrote down Socrates' Apology to the jury to learn about his views. Also in the Dialogues, Plato set down the discussions he and others had with Socrates which reveal how Socrates elicited profound ideas from his interlocutors by gently questioning them... to...
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics
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...Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle is one of the ancient who left an impact evident in his bookon ‘Ethics’. Although the original book appeared in Greek, a factor that has made translation quite hectic, this volume manages to bring out ideas as perceived by Aristotle. These ideas concern happiness, human, and the universe. The book provides insight on the virtues and vices described by Aristotle. The volume consists of ten books as Aristotle penned them down. This essay will center its focus on the first five books and the last one. This preview will cite some critical quotes and analyze them. In the...
Aristotle, Mill, Kant
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...Aristotle’s account of moral virtue According to Aristotle, moral virtue refers to a of character that falls in between deficiency and excess. In addition, Aristotle believes that there needs to be a clear-cut distinction between the intellectual and moral virtues. Moral virtues are concerned with feelings, choices and decisions while intellectual ones are those virtues that result from education. Aristotle also believes that happiness is not achievable unless the person in pursuit of it has attained the state of morality (Talbot, 2005). 2. State and explain Mill’s supreme moral principle  Mill’s supreme moral principal states that: "The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals... 1. and explain...
Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics
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...Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle’s best known work on ethics, The Nicomachean Ethics (350 B.C.E has been one of the most essential philosophical treatises on ethical issues for the last several centuries. Significantly, the Book VI of The Nicomachean Ethics specifically deals with the intellectual virtue which is the continuation of the discussion on the moral virtues, covering Books II to V. In fact, Aristotle makes an essential distinction between moral virtues and intellectual virtues in Book II and the former refers to virtues learned through habit and practice while the latter refers to virtues learned through instruction. Therefore, it is essential to realize that the Book VI... ...
Philosopher's Biography: Aristotle
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...Aristotle Aristotle serves as one of the most distinguished personalities the world has ever produced. By dint of his God-gifted wisdom, extraordinary talent, outstanding foresight, innate curiosity of learning from the social and natural environment, determination to explore every aspect of the universe, unquenchable inquisitiveness and vast observation of natural phenomena, the great philosopher laid the foundation of school of his philosophical thought, which not only inspired millions of people belonging to divergent societies, cultures, regions and religions of the world, but left indelible imprints of his tremendous knowledge and outstanding intellect for the next generations... Module Module ID:...
Aristotle and Augustine
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...Aristotle to Augustine) Prof. Byamugisha Georoson Wilson CALGARY UNIVERSITY, CANADA 2009 ABSTRACT This Thetic Presentation embodies reflections from two varying but significant Schools of thought - namely, Aristotle and Augustine. In fact, they are, each renowned for their Philosophical Excellence in the World of Academia - let alone, the Fields of Philosophy and Science, which seem to conflict, to some reasonable extent. Their Emotions, Feelings and Reactions... TAXONOMY Comprehension, Application, Analysis and Synthesis (From...
Human Rationalism by Aristotle
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...Aristotle Introduction Rationalism is a knowledge theory asserting that reason is the source of knowledge (Aristotle 6). Reality has an inherent logical structure and certain rational principles exist just like in mathematics and logic. The reason uses logic and justifies the beliefs and morals of human beings. Rational soul is a form of living thing and is the first actuality of human beings. The rational soul can engage in activities of human beings such as perception, intellect and movement (Dawn 4). The soul is not kind of body, but cannot exist independently without a body. According to Aristotle, reason is inborn and exists in human beings through an induction process... Human Rationalism by...
Plato, Aristotle, Sophism
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...Aristotles four causes. What is his theory of four causes designed to address? How does he employ this theory as the basis for his critique of his predecessors, especially Plato? For Aristotle, a firm understanding of what a cause is, and how many types of causes there are, is significant for successful explanation of the world around us. Aristotle identifies four kinds of things that can be applied in answer to a why-question: a. The material cause, which Aristotle stated that in every change, something gets a new determination first before undergoing any form of change, which is in potency to a new... Q1. Explain the various points Plato is making in the Allegory of the Cave. Why does he tell this...
Aristotle and the humanities
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...Aristotle and the Humanities The Greek philosopher Aristotle made contributions to the humanities through his ideas about art, as well as philosophy, specifically through his ideas regarding ethics and politics. When it came to art, Aristotle’s Poetics was an answer to Plato’s accusation against the artists for their alleged destruction of rational harmony, as stated in the Republic (Wolff 64). In the field of ethics, Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics provided the basis for showing how to live one’s life in the virtuous way and helped people of his times decide on which things were more important in their lives and what they...
Aristotle on Moral Responsibility
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...Aristotle on Moral Responsibility Introduction The work of Aristotle is given great attention because after Plato he continued with the foundations of western philosophy. It is not possible to read an introduction of western philosophy without the mention of Aristotle. The discussion of moral responsibility composes a significant part of Aristotle’s philosophy. He discusses morality on the basis of voluntary and involuntary actions. He also believes that virtues are of two kinds, intellectual and moral virtue. Apart from involuntary and voluntary criteria, there is another criterion that Aristotle uses for moral responsibility. A person is not morally... Inserts His/her Inserts Inserts Grade (14, 07,...
Aristotle on akrasia
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Aristotle on Akrasia Ethics and ethical values have been the favourite s of philosophy from time immemorial and the ancient Greek philosopherslike Socrates, Plato and Aristotle considered such virtues to be of vital importance to a well-lived life. Aristotle, following the teachings of his masters, observed the ethical values as complex and practical wisdom, which cannot be gained solely by the learning of general rules, is the requirement for a better position on questions that deal with ethics. The position embraced by this great master of philosophy on the character traits of “akrasia” (incontinence or lack of mastery) and “enkrateia”...
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