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The challenges of delivering a holistic approach to rehabilitating motor skills following a frontal lobe injury.
12 pages (3000 words) , Essay
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...frontal lobe injury Introduction Brain trauma can bring about significantly unfavourable health injuries and impairment to affected patients. The brain controls majority of our neurological functions and responses; and they help ensure that the organ and system functions are within normal parameters. In instances where frontal lobe injuries are experienced, the rehabilitative processes require various focal points in order to partially and holistically restore normal functioning. This paper shall discuss the challenges of delivering a holistic approach... to rehabilitating motor skills following a frontal lobe injury. It will first discuss the impact and...
The challenges of delivering a holistic approach to rehabilitating motor skills following a frontal lobe injury.
12 pages (3000 words) , Essay
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...frontal lobe injuries are experienced, the rehabilitative processes require specific restorative focal areas in order to partially and holistically restore normal functioning. This essay will critically evaluate the available evidence and discuss implication for the current practice. It shall discuss... ?“Critically evaluate current approaches to the management of a chosen neurological problem or a specific intervention” Introduction Brain trauma canbring about significantly unfavourable health issues for affected patients. The brain controls majority of our neurological functions and responses; and it helps ensure that the organ and system functions are within normal parameters. In instances where...
The role of the frontal lobes in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
9 pages (2250 words) , Essay
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...frontal lobe lesions patients. In recent researches and studies it has been often claimed that the frontal lobe plays a decisive role in inhibition and these patients are unable to mediate responsibility of decision making. These children cannot decide for themselves whether they make right or wrong choice, whether they make the right assessment of their choice etc (Chapter 7—Brief Psychodynamic Therapy). This can be explained by a malfunction of anterior ciangulate cortex and adaptation of a child to the environment is challenged in this case. ADHD children suffer from dysfunction... The role of the frontal lobes in Attention –Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder By The role of the frontal lobes in Attention ...
Occipital lobe
1 pages (250 words) , Research Paper
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...lobe. The study shows that some regions of the right dorsal occipital stream do not need visual experience to develop a specialization for the processing of spatial information. 11 individuals born blind and 11 others not born blind were used in the research. The activity of the brain was monitored via MRI scanning while in the same time being subjected to a series of tones. "The results showed the brains fascinating plasticity," Collignon said "The brain set aside certain set of regions for spatial processing, even if it is denied of its natural inputs since birth. Brain visually deprived is flexible enough that it uses "neuronal niche... March 17, Source: of montreal Summary: Dr. Olivier Collignon of...
Human Memory Essay
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...assessment of the temporal sequence and recency of events.12 The left medial temporal and left frontal lobes are most active when a person is learning words whereas the right medial temporal and right frontal lobes are most active when learning visual scenes.13 The figure 2 illustrates the anatomical structure of episodic memory.14 The dysfunction of the episodic memory is explained by the Ribot's law according to which events just before an ictus are most vulnerable to dissolution, whereas remote memories are most resistant. Thus, in cases of dysfunction of the episodic memory system, the ability to learn new information is impaired (anterograde amnesia) and recently learned... MAJOR SUB IFICATIONS OF...
Erectile Dysfunction
1 pages (250 words) , Assignment
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...Dysfunction Affiliation Erectile Dysfunction is usually described as the condition where a man is unable to get and maintain an erection. This condition is mostly prevalent in older men as opposed to the younger men. Statistics shows that half of the population of men will have this condition when they are between forty to seventy years of age. Causes of Erectile Dysfunction Endocrine diseases, such as diabetes, can lead to impotence as they cause nerve damage that mostly affects the penis sensations. They also impair blood flow and hormone levels, which may lead to weakness. Neurological and nerve disorders, for example, stroke, brain tumors and multiple sclerosis, can affect how... the...
Asperger's Syndrome Term Paper
8 pages (2000 words) , Term Paper
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...dysfunction in the Frontal Lobe may contribute to some of the deficits apparent in individuals with ASD, inclusive of social cognition, language, working memory, problem solving, imitation, and facial expressions. Asperger’s children have also manifested decreased activation in the medial prefrontal cortex compared to a control group. The functions of the Temporal Lobe relate to most of the deficits examined in persons with ASDs such as social cognition, receptive language, empathy, joint attention, and action observation (Lyons & Fitzgerald, 2005). One of the propositions... ? The Biopsychology of the Neurological Disorders Asperger's Syndrome Asperger’s syndrome refers to a pervasive developmental...
Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder And Learning
11 pages (2750 words) , Essay
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...frontal lobe dysfunction in ADHD. Consistent with the results of such studies, the children with ADHD of this study had a significantly low organization score compared with the other groups. Such a result demonstrated the underlying problems of children with ADHD in their organization ability. Seidman et al also found a low...  Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder And Learning Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) holds the distinction of beingthe most commonly diagnosed mental health disorder among children in the United States. Accordingly, recent research indicates that ADHD can be found in approximately 3% to 5% of school-aged children. Furthermore, this disorder is more commonly...
Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
12 pages (3000 words) , Essay
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...frontal lobe functioning. EN requires many of the tests which are commonly employed to assess other cognitive functions and are encountered as the neuropsychological impairments seen in the various degenerative diseases. One exception, however, is the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) which is possibly the most commonly employed measure of frontal lobe damage. The most common indicators of performance are the number of categories (or changes in rule) learned and the number of perservative errors. Perseveration is defined as the continued use of an old rule after a change to the new one... Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology Relationship between Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology...
Sexual Dysfunction
8 pages (2000 words) , Research Paper
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...Dysfunction Sexual Dysfunction Introduction Sexual dysfunction in both male and female gender identities is as a result of multiple etiological factors such as psychological, biological, behavioral and genetic elements (Zakhari, 2009). In this sense, many investigators and researchers have demonstrated increased interest in the study of the etiological aspects of sexual dysfunction as a basis of assessment, diagnosis and management of the various forms of sexual dysfunction among individuals. These investigations include empirical studies which present results that have significant implications on clinical practice and future studies on the topic. This research paper presents a critical... ? Sexual...
SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION
1 pages (250 words) , Assignment
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...Dysfunction A kind of sexual dysfunction that exists within males but affects thefemales nonetheless is the erectile dysfunction. It is also known as ‘impotence’ and is referred to as the ‘daremonsta’. Erectile dysfunction is basically a sexual disorder or sexual malfunction that can arise during any stage of the sexual act and prevents the individual or couple from enjoying sexual activity. This sexual dysfunction is on the whole typified by the incapability of the human being to develop as well as maintain an erection of the penis for satisfactory sexual activity or intercourse without bringing to notice the ability that is related with ejaculation. However, for erectile... ID Lecturer Sexual...
Case Study - Mental Dysfunction
10 pages (2500 words) , Case Study
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...assessment of this scenario, Isaac is suffering from mental health problems that arose out of his experiences, especially after leaving school. Isaac is suffering from depression. He portrays signs which (Barry (1998) identifies as signs of depression. These are altered sleep patterns, lack of motivation, poor moods and social withdrawal. It is clear that before the day he was sexually harassed, Isaac used to hang out with friends but he withdrew from them since that day onwards. This incident also changed him from being a happy boy... Case Study Overview of the presenting issues as outlined in the case scenario and the best care for Isaac, I and other emergency department staff. From an assessment of...
Discussions
5 pages (1250 words) , Assignment
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...Dysfunction in these skills will deteriorate those skills, which can affect one’s ability to attend school, attend and complete work tasks, and maintain healthy social relationships. Dysfunctional of executive function can have several causes; brain injury, Alzheimer’s, and birth defects, are just a few. Determining the presents frontal lobe dysfunction is essential in the hope of diagnosing, treating, and ideally, improving the patient’s condition. ("What is executive," 2012) The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, or WCST, is a commonly used psychological assessment that is proven itself as an affective indicator of dysfunctions of executive functions... Due Discussion Board Posts Question Sensory and...
Neuro Final Project
8 pages (2000 words) , Research Paper
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...lobe areas that disrupt non-verbal skills and low scoring patients in this test tend to have difficulty making decisions and planning ahead, process information slowly and have problems in social relationships. A subject’s inability to choose correctly would be proof of damage to the frontal lobe. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) is a test used to assess persistence and abstract thinking and is regarded as a measure of executive function due to its sensitivity to dysfunction in the frontal lobe. This test is important due to its ability... ? Neurofinal project of Learning: content Background 0 DSM ification 1 Genetic and environmental contributions to Dementia 1.2 Use of various brain scans 1.3...
Hormonal dysfunction of preeclampsia
15 pages (3750 words) , Essay
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...Dysfunction of Pre-eclampsia Introduction Among the hypertensive disorders that present complications during pregnancy are the variety of vascular disturbances consisting of gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, HELPP syndrome, eclampsia and chronic hypertension. In the United Kingdom it is estimated that the hypertensive group of disorders are the second most common cause of maternal deaths during pregnancy. Complications during pregnancy as a result of hypertension are believed to be in the range of five to eight percent, with nearly eighty percent of these complications resulting from pre-eclampsia. Pre-eclampsia is found to occur most commonly in young first-time pregnant women, first...
Spinal Dysfunction: Maitland and Mulligan
5 pages (1250 words) , Literature review
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...DYSFUNCTION (school) Word count: 1606 Spinal Dysfunction: Maitland and Mulligan Lower back pain is one of the most common health problems encountered by adults. Waxman, et.al., (2000, p. 2085) discusses that it has a 60% lifetime prevalence rate among adults; and a single episode of lower back pain can mark an episodic incidence, and the progress of the pain or dysfunction to chronic status. There are various causes of lumbar spine dysfunction, some 6-13% are associated with sports injuries (Trainor, et.al., 2002, p. 93). Among elderly patients, lumbar pain dysfunction often manifests as part of the aging process, osteoarthritis, and other degenerative disorders. Most of these patients... ?SPINAL...
Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
20 pages (5000 words) , Research Paper
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...frontal and medial temporal lobes; enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles; cavum septum pellucidum; and septal fenestrations. There also may be thinning of the hypothalamic floor, shrinkage of the mammillary bodies, and atrophy of the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and amygdale (Stern et al., 2011). Microscopic Neuropathology CTE is characterized by a unique pattern of microscopic changes. There are extensive tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), neuropil neurites (NT), and glial tangles (GT) in the frontal and temporal... CHRONIC TRAUMATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY: A Clinical Case Review PSYC 4080 Somayya Saleemi Dr. Mary E. Desrocher June 30, This researchpaper was completed for PSYC 4080...
Factors Inhibiting Erectile Dysfunction
10 pages (2500 words) , Research Paper
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...Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction can be regarded as one of the most common sexual problems in men and affects close to 30 million men in the United States. Once referred to as impotence, erectile dysfunction (ED) infers the constant inability to attain, and/or sustain an erection that is sufficient for satisfactory love making. ED shares common risk factors as cardiovascular disease such as lack of exercise, smoking, obesity, metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome, most of which can be modified. The association of modifiable behavior aspect with ED, mostly among individuals without recognized comorbidities, presents an opportunity for intervention strategies... to prevent and possibly...
Sexual Dysfunction: Male Erectile disorder
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...assessment of sexually dysfunctional patients and psychosexual counseling are useful in selected patients in clinical settings. Counseling is often compared to taking drugs like Sildenafil but more important in the case of ED are not the costs but the outcome without any side effects. Counseling requires that the counselor is able to convince the patient that ED can be overcome which would give him the confidence to go in for long-term treatment. All patients evaluated for ED should undergo comprehensive medical, sexual and psychosocial history evaluations (Shabsigh, 2003). ED can be overcome by alteration in lifestyle like giving up smoking or substance...
Erectile dysfunction & Gender Identity disorder
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...dysfunction and the other on gender identity disorder, the first case would benefit from a differential diagnosis, whereas the second would not apply. The first vignette defines erectile dysfunction and the ill-effects this condition can have on the man suffering from the illness. As an erection is so... In medical observation or treatment, a differential diagnosis may be used to identify unknown cases of illness or disease through a process of elimination. However, doctors tend to rely more of a set of possible outcomes to given symptoms, or they rely on their experience or intuition to decide on the patient’s illness while listening to the symptoms. In reviewing the two vignettes, one on erectile...
Qualitative Research on Erectile Dysfunction
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Dysfunction Summary Tomlinson and Wright (2004) ventured on the impact of erectile dysfunction in men given sildenafil treatment through exploratory qualitative methods. Through this they aim to ascertain the influence of the condition in the personal lives of men, in their relationships with their partners, friends, and colleagues, and scrutinize the effect of the success of failure of sildenafil as treatment. In this endeavor they pursue for qualitative outcomes instead of the quantitative results other researches have given and continue to participate in (Sommer, Klotz, & Engelmann, 2007; Kadioglu, et al., 2007). They give importance to the emotions of men... ?Qualitative Research on Erectile...
Neurology Assignment 1
4 pages (1000 words) , Assignment
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...frontal lobe. This part is located right above the eye, and the parts of the brain leading to it, which include the cortical... Dementia Introduction Dementia as a medical term does not represent any specific disease (Sonty et al, 2007, p.1334). It is amedical term that defines the type of medical condition that is branded by a lot of symptoms that are not meant as normal part during the ageing process. It is a common problem found at the elderly stage of a person. 50% of the adult generation are victims of Dementia when they reach their late 80s (Caplan and Rabinowitz, 2010, p.1116). Dementia that is relevant to ailments occurs due to the relapse of cerebral matter and damage of brain chemicals. This d...
Fatigue and Limbic Dysfunction in Parkinsons Disease
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
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...dysfunction in PD will help rationalise treatment approaches for this disabling illness and its symptoms. Incidence and Prevalence Estimates of the annual incidence of Parkinson's disease are in the range of 4-20 per 100,000 individuals. A widely accepted figure for the prevalence of Parkinson's disease is approximately 200 per 100,000 populations. In the Unite States, it is estimated that between 750,000 and 1.5 million people have the disease. In the United... Critique for Client I have additionally edited this document for reference cites that were not originally provided. The cites needed to be double checked as well because the volume numbers of journal entries were missing. The cites that I...
Reading disabilities focusing on Dyslexia
15 pages (3750 words) , Research Proposal
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...Frontal lobe dysfunction is also a strong feature found in dyslexic children. This area is theorized to regulate the motor articulatory feedback. The person may be unable to associate the position of the articulators with speech sounds. Due... Running Head: Understanding Dyslexia Development of Learning Patterns, Learning Disabilities, Dyslexia and Methods to Rectify: Literature Review [Writer’s Name] [Institute’s Name] Development of Learning Patterns, Learning Disabilities, Dyslexia and Methods to Rectify: Literature Review TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract………………………………………………………………………………………3 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………..4 What is dyslexia……………………………………………………………............................6 Genet...
Asperger's Disorder
6 pages (1500 words) , Term Paper
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...frontal lobe dysfunction (Frith, n.d., p. 15). The interactional understanding of Asperger’s disorder focused primarily on socialization. Ashley (2007) delineated the interactional characteristics of a child with Asperger’s disorder. The child with Asperger’s disorder does not: engage in a normal eye contact, read social cues and understand body language, show much interest and empathy in other people, converse on topic and respond to what others are saying (p. 6). It is hard to understand the biological root cause of the Asperger’s disorder. Likewise, the socialization barriers make it harder for these individuals to sustain... relationships and to share emotions, experiences, and interests...
Sexual Abuse and Sexual Dysfunction/
14 pages (3500 words) , Essay
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...Dysfunction/Addiction Sexual Abuse & Sexual Dysfunction/Addiction of the of the Institution Sexual Abuse & Sexual Dysfunction/Addiction Introduction The term 'abuse' has a Latin root abusare but it is not until early modern times that it has found its way into European languages in its present sense as misuse, disuse, ill-treat, violate, defile or pervert. Sexual abuse and harassment are relatively recent legal and moral concerns. They both involve sexual advances or actions that occur against the wishes of the person toward whom they are directed or in situations in which that person is either incompetent to consent or where consent was given under conditions... Running Head: Sexual Abuse & Sexual...
M-Mode echocardiogram in Left-Ventricular Dysfunction
3 pages (750 words) , Research Paper
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...Dysfunction The M-mode echocardiogram provides a clear representation of the internal parts of the human heart via sections that apply for parts and the resulting wave’s equivalence to physics laws. While using the M-mode, systolic division the essential parts of the human anatomy is illustrated through mitral regurgitation, though this result has not been specified. Francis has provided medical and physicist knowledge, with a modification of the outline of organ-viewing things that use waves that corresponds with organ motion and shape. Some of the information in the article worth remembering includes facts such as the intersection made by the two leaflets... M-Mode echocardiogram in Left-Ventricular...
Discuss the cellular basis of diastolic dysfunction
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
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...dysfunction CELLULAR BASIS OF DIASTOLIC DYSFUNCTION Order # 281541 www.academia-research.com Cellular basis of diastolic dysfunction TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. What is diastolic dysfunction? ………………………………………….. 2 2. Brief overview ………………………………………………………….... 3 3. Functional changes in diastolic dysfunction …………………………… 4 4. Role of myocytes in relaxation phase of cardiac cycle ………………… 4 5. Factors affecting the calcium transient ………………………………… 5 6. Potassium depletion and diastolic dysfunction ………………………… 8 7. Other possible mechanisms involved …………………………………… 8 8. Discussion ………………………………………………………………… 9 9. References ………………………………………………………………... 11 Cellular basis of diastolic... ...
Tramatic Brain Injury
9 pages (2250 words) , Research Paper
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...dysfunction to specific areas of the brain. A trained neuropsychologist is equipped to not only assess the insult to the brain through testing, but is also able to evaluate behavior and cognitive status thereby possessing the unique abilities to drive the rehabilitation process. The other area relating to traumatic brain injury is the area of emotional adjustment, not only for those inflicted but also how it affects their close friends and family members as well. The individual who has suffered a brain injury has problems relating to others as they had in the past, both personal and professional relationships tend to undergo dramatic changes. The emotional... Traumatic Brain Injury Traumatic brain...
Developmental dyslexia: specific phonological deficit or general sensorimotor dysfunction?
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...DYSFUNCTION It is very clear that a significant proportion of individuals with dyslexia present not only motor deficits but also sensory deficits (Park, 2009 & Marshall, 2004). But as this ‘sensorimotor syndrome’ is researched in great detail, it is also clear that the sensory and motor disorders ultimately play only limited roles in a casual explanation of particular disability in reading (Vinson, 2007). (Ward, 2009) Development dyslexia is failure to get reading skills affecting around 5% children despite the fact that adequate intelligence, social background and education (Benasich & Fitch, 2012). A wide consensus has... DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA: SPECIFIC PHONOLOGICAL DEFICIT OR GENERAL SENSORIMOTOR...
Hormones and Sexual Dysfunction among Women
6 pages (1500 words) , Term Paper
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...dysfunction of women? How the imbalance of hormones plays a role in the sexual dysfunctionof women? Hormones are chemicals. The bloodstream carries the hormones to other parts of the body, where they act on target tissue to produce physiological effects. Many hormones are produced by endocrine glands (which are ductless). Other tissues, like the heart and kidney, also secrete hormones (Dr. Conduit et al 2001). Hormones are released by certain cells or glands in human body which can affect human behaviour in many ways. Even a small variation in hormone level can make big changes in the behaviour of a person. Mood changes, inhibition of growth... ? How the imbalance of hormones plays a role in the sexual...
Assessment
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Assessment Assessment After conducting a physical assessment on various parts of one of my male patient’s body, I managed to figure out a number of normal and abnormal findings. Some of the normal findings I found on the patient’s head include presence of all the fourteen facial bones. These particular bones are the ones that join the sutures. The patient had a general size of the head. Another significant normal finding I managed to figure out is that there were no deformities on the head. I also managed to figure out various abnormal findings that include lesions of the skin. There were scaliness and various lumps on the scalp of the...
Assessment
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Assessment Examine reliability and validity of objective tests. Construct an objective test. You just finished creating a lengthy objective assessment. How might you determine the reliability and validity of the assessment? Why is this important? Objective test is a type of test that has multiple answers of which only one is correct. To determine the level of confidence of score obtained from a test, it is always good practice to evaluate reliability and validity of the test. This entails determining the consistency and ability of the test to quantify what it is intended to measure. The reliability of a subjective test is determined by the...
Psychology Evaluate addiction in terms of brain dysfunction
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
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...dysfunction within the two cortical systems of the brain; the anterior cingulated cortex and the orbit frontal cortex, which are critically involved in self-regulation and together form the core of the inhibitory system. West (2006) claims that, people should exercise restraint over stimuli for addictive behaviour, in order to reduce the effectiveness of human behaviour that is addictive. For instance, an obsessive behaviour, whose subject may demand that they receive no relief at all from taking alcohol, and dislike the habit, but persist in the behaviour and become anxious after getting drunk; drug... Psychology - Evaluate addiction in terms of brain dysfunction Introduction Theory of addiction is...
Assessment
3 pages (750 words) , Assignment
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...Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Assessment tools are methods or facilities that enable a teacher or instructor to gather information about the general learning in classroom. The ability to choose an appropriate assessment tool depends on the objectives of the instructors and whether they are long term or short term. National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is one such tool that has been used for decades to assess students. Since it was initiated, the National Assessment Progress has monitored the national educational process through conducting periodic assessments in various subjects. The NAEP has ensured a variety of adjustments in schools since... ? Afrah Alowaydhy 60215 National...
Assessment
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Assessment al affiliation Assessment The concept of assessments in the educational sector has been a contentious issue over the years. Various analysts argue that the entire concept of assessment must be shunned, with the argument that educators have not been keen in administration of the same in the classroom environment. On the other hand, others argue that assessments are monotonous making the teachers develop a notion that the entire concept holds no value. The fact that the administration keeps coercing them to administer numerous tests makes the teachers perform for the sake of the administration,...
Assessment
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Assessment: Instructional Collaboration What does instructional collaboration mean to you? I would define it as the process involving evaluation, design, utilization, and management of school learning processes and resources to achieve distinct student-centered goals. Instructional collaboration also involves school librarian’s role in planning, and assessing curriculum and lessons requirements. During lessons planning, the librarian guides on the syllabus resources that would augment teachers’ instructions and crucial information on how to incorporate technology projects in the company plans. Instructional collaboration also involves the guidance and management of the school principal whose...
Assessment
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...Assessment Assessment refers to estimation of a s quality or capa with respect to an achievement. It has become one of the most significant issues in the education environment and policies towards enhancing education. This paper seeks to explore Popham’s view of classroom assessment. Accountability on the other hand defines an individual’s responsibility over a subject. The role of assessment in determining accountability, in an education set up, is the provision of evidence upon which judgment can be made on accountability level. This is partly because learning is not a directly observable quantity and requires...
Assessment
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Assessment Number] Assessment Assessments are most important part of the curriculum because these are professionally designed to measure different aspects of students’ knowledge and learning outcomes. Science is a vast field, as it includes different experimental aspects of study area. Designed assessments of science subjects contribute to measure the growth and understanding of the subject. Assessments enhance students learning and help teachers identify what students know and what they can do with their knowledge (IMS.Ode, 2011). This paper aims to design an assessment program for science students, which will include processes and instruments integral for students learning. The designed... ...
Assessment
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...assess the social welfare generated by various production and consumption decisions made by economic agents, economists calculate the private costs and benefits and compare them with social costs and benefits. Government intervention is necessary to make the decision maker internalize the social cost of the decision, i.e., the creators of externality must realize the impact of the externality before creating them. Examples of government intervention include, pollution tax, congestion charge and environmental tax such as, landfill tax and plastic bag tax and road tax. Figure 5: Correcting negative externality by government intervention... ?Microeconomics Answer Perfect competition is a market structure in ...
Assessment
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...assess the social welfare generated by various production and consumption decisions made by economic agents, economists calculate the private costs and benefits and compare them with social costs and benefits. Government intervention is necessary to make the decision maker internalize the social cost of the decision, i.e., the creators of externality must realize the impact of the externality before creating them. Examples of government intervention include, pollution tax, congestion charge and environmental tax such as, landfill tax and plastic bag tax and road tax. Figure 5: Correcting negative externality... Microeconomics Answer Perfect competition is a market structure in which there are infinite...
Assessment
8 pages (2000 words) , Assignment
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...Assessment Activity 2 2 MR. G is a 64 years old Hispanic male who reports pain and numbness in her knees, ankle joints, elbows, and wrists. Mr. G is overweight with BP 160/80 and a regular HR of 96. He has a respiratory rate of 24 with no fever. He also has a history of acute arthritis. He has experienced a decrease in his functional ability as he reports that he no longer goes for walks like he initially did, and that he no longer volunteers in the kindergarten as a cook. 2.2 Peter believes that he is just experiencing symptoms of old age and that everyone experiences them at some point. From my review, it is evident that Mr. G’s condition with arthritis is advancing to a more chronic stage...
Assessment
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Assessment There are three main types of assessment used in teaching, ly initial, formative and summative. The different methods of assessment used in teaching include but are not limited to quizzes, assignments, group projects, class tests, and final exam. In addition to that, viva may also be taken. Quizzes may or may not be declared before. The more effective approach is to take surprise quizzes because the main purpose of taking quizzes is to encourage the learners to pay attention toward the lecture for if they do not, they would lose marks in the quizzes and that would eventually affect their grades. The purpose of assignment is to...
Assessment
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...assessment instrument that is used to measure the skills, knowledge, aptitude, or physical fitness of the test taker (Thissen and Wainer, 2001). An exam may be oral, written, or physical. Tests also vary in requirements, rigor and style. A closed book exam, for example, requires the person being examined to rely on memory to answer the questions. Examinations are also formal or informal. Formal tests normally result in test scores or grades. A standardized test is a type of exam that is usually consistently administered and scored for legal defensibility (Thissen and Wainer, 2001). This type of exam is used in professional certification, education, psychology... ?Examination An examination is a type of...
Language Development
4 pages (1000 words) , Download 2 , Essay
...lobes, the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal. The occipital lobe has primary responsibility of visual functioning, which expands to adjacent areas of the temporal and parietal lobes. The temporal lobes are concerned with auditory processing which in turn is associated with language. There exists substantial evidence which confirm that substandard sections of the temporal lobe sustain semantic functions, while structures... have been assigned specific names, for instance, the deep fissure which separates the temporal from the frontal and parietal lobes is referred to as the lateral or sylvian fissure; the adjacent to this fissure in the left...
Nuero physiotherapy
10 pages (2500 words) , Assignment
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...dysfunction impacting the ability to assess, interpret, organize, and implement complex information as part of the symptoms of cognitive deficit. The susceptibility of dementia and vascular cognitive deficiencies as well as the rate at which individuals experience cognitive decline depends on the management of underlying susceptibility factors for stroke. Vascular cognitive inabilities as well as dementia do get worse if patients are not given medical attention (Gorelick et al. 2011... Neurophysiology: A Case Study of a Patient with Stroke Introduction Stoke is an abrupt forfeiture of neurological function occurring because of focal disturbance of an individual’s cerebral flow of blood due to hemorrhage...
Assessment
16 pages (4000 words) , Assignment
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...assessment of the results measured. An analysis is made using personal knowledge and understanding about the issues. The report ends by concluding on the results of comparative analysis. Financial Analysis Liquidity Ratios Current Ratio Current... Contents Introduction to Companies 4 Review of Financial Accounting and Reporting Standards 4 Procedures 5 Financial Analysis 5 Liquidity Ratios 5 Current Ratio 5 Quick Ratio 6 Activity Ratios 7 Inventory Turnover in days 7 Receivable Turnover (in days) 7 Payable Turnover (in days) 8 Leverage Ratios 8 Debt to Equity Ratio 8 Borrowing Ratio 9 Gearing Ratio 10 Coverage Ratio 10 Profitability Ratios 10 Marketability Ratio 11 Strengths and Weaknesses of the Report 1...
An Analysis of Psychological Disorders. Anxiety and Drug Abuse.
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
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...lobes namely the thalamus, hypothalamus, corpus callosum and the limbic system. As a whole, the forefront controls cognition (the process of knowing, thinking, learning and judging), motor and sensory function, emotional expression, hunger, temperature regulation and sleep cycle. Skewed thought organization occurs within the frontal lobe creating the delusional ideations that are a more frequent positive symptom of schizophrenia. In addition, the temporal lobe regulates... ?Psychological Disorders Part A. Schizophrenia Schizophrenia can be defined as a severe, lifelong mental/brain disorder characterized by poor emotional responsiveness and a breakdown of thought processes. Although the major effect of...
Analyzing Psychological Disorders
7 pages (1750 words) , Term Paper
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...frontal lobe) show reduced gray matter and decreased brain volume (Campbell, 2010). The ventricles and the basal nuclei are also affected since these appear larger for schizophrenics; the hippocampus and amygdala are also different as they appear smaller for these patients (Campbell, 2010). In a theory set forth by Pierce Howard, he explains that the brain normally goes through the process of “synaptic pruning” from the period of adolescence to young adulthood, and during this stage, some connections in the synapses which are “unnecessary... Running head: Psychological Disorders Analyzing Psychological Disorders (school) Analyzing Psychological Disorders: Schizophrenia Introduction Psychological disor...
Critically discuss the relative benefits and challenges of using group work as opposed to 1:1 work in social work practice.'
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Assignment
...frontal lobe dysfunction. The ranges of techniques that are used for group work helps in the development of self-expression and give rise to new learning by means of experience and rehearsal (Salmon and Abell, 1996, p. 221-223). References 1. Atherton... Group Work Theories and Practices To start with the study of different group work theories and models, it is important to know what is meant by a group and group work. A group can be defined in different ways, and giving an absolute meaning of a group in relation with the theory around group work, is quite complicated and debatable. In general a group is simply a small gathering of people. Group work may be traditionally defined as a type of social work ...
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