The Islamic Conquests
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...Conquests The sudden explosion of the Islamic Empire out of Arabia in the Seventh century has been of interest to scholars since the beginning of modern historiography (Gibon VI, 282-363). There are two possible categories of explanation for the phenomenal success of the Islamic expansion out of Arabia in the seventh and eighth centuries. The first of these are geo-political explanations which look toward the military and strategic circumstances of the Islamic conquest. Another category is sociological explanations which treat the event in terms of the strengths and weakness of both the conquering and conquered cultures. In Empire to Commonwealth (12-19), historian Garth Fowden has... The Islamic...
Roman and Mongol Conquests
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...Conquests s The Mongol Empire was united under the Great Mongol ruler Genghis Khan since 1206 (Burgan, 2005). The Empire stretched from the central parts of Europe to the Japanese sea. It extended north into Siberia and South to the Indian Sub-continent to the Arabian Peninsula and the Iranian plateau. Similarly, the Roman Empire grew from a small city-state to become a great Empire occupying most of southern and western Europe. It stretched Near East and northern parts of Africa (Livy, 1905). The expansion of these two civilizations was spurred by the rise of leaders who employed military strategies and enforced social order. The leaders crafted policies that ensured continued... Roman and Mongol...
Cultural Effects of Alexander's Conquests
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...Conquests Alexander is considered one of the most powerful and successful commanders of all the times, conquering most of the known world before his death. Alexander conquered the Persian Empire, Syria, Egypt, Iraq, Central Asia, and India. He integrated foreigners in his army and followed the policy of fusion. With the Alexander conquests, the frontiers of Europe were extended to the entire known world. As a result, the Greeks were exposed to different kind of culture and civilization, and it happened at a time, when Greek civilization and literature was its peak. The people of Asia were quick to adopt the culture of the conquerors. This situation set the stage... Cultural Effects of Alexander's...
Alexander the Great--Vision beyond Conquests
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...Conquests Introduction The of Alexander the Great bringsinto mind a special experience of a winning spirit as there is no other name as prominent as his in the history of wars and valor of great personalities. The legendary Macedonian name that glittered the glory of apex world conquest had only a span of thirty three years of life; however, Alexander, was from all angles, an outstanding individual example of excellence in one’s own field, and rather interestingly, his own was the greatest ever known quest for expedition and invasion of new lands and the political expansion of his empire’s unchallenged area. During the years of his fearless... , the Macedonian force entered India through...
"How do you explain Alexander the Great's militaryachievements and conquests: How would you sum up his legacy"
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...Conquest And Legacy to the World Alexander the Great occupies a special niche in history as “Ruler of the World” who conquered much of ancient civilization through his military genius and political savvy, traits he inherited from his father and honed to perfection by experience. He lived one of the most amazing military careers in history, never losing a battle, although his conquering army was always outnumbered in the field. The secrets of his military successes included the phalanx 1 which gave the enemy little opening for retaliatory attack. He understood early on the importance of the cavalry as an offensive weapon, and was a master at compensating... Alexander the Great: His Wars for Conquest ...
To what extent was religion behind the successes of the great Arab conquests of the seventh and eighth centuries?
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...Conquest Introduction: Historians have long sought to answer the question of what defined the rapid success and territorial gains that the Islamic Empire was able to effect within the first few decades after the faith itself was established. The ultimate question that pervades this discussion is whether or not the religion of Islam played a pivotal and fundamental role in the early success that the Islamic Empire was able to achieve. In other words, was the inclusion of the Islamic faith a central component to why the Arab led invasions of the vast swaths of territory throughout North Africa, Central... Section/# The Question of the Islamic Religion’s Underlying Role in the Process of Early Islamic...
Western European superiority - better than Indians, the Chinese and European neighbors- imperialist conquests and World War I.
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...conquests and World War I World War 1 was as a result of various factors, amongst them the Western European feelings of superiority. In the argument of Perry, et al it is clear that the Western Front fronted a series of wars till the end of the war (365). The western part involved the N.E part of Belgium and France, whilst Netherlands opted to remain neutral throughout the war, and the British Empire as well, battling out with the then Prussia (Perry, et al 365). Scholars indicate that Western Europe forged ahead of other parts of Europe, and the world, including Asia. The western front had a b added... Western European superiority- better than Indians, the Chinese and European neighbors- imperialist...
What economic advantages did the Europeans gain from their conquests in the new world?
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...Conquest of the New World Benefits to European Countries from Conquest of the NewWorld The conquest of the new world can be in other words be described as colonialism and as such, it a situation entailing implementation of social aspects including the economic, political as well as social policies in an efforts towards assisting a country to experience a maintained or an extended authority and outmost control over other states. In colonialism, it is usually that the country being colonized is much weaker as compared to the colonizing country and as such, the stronger country exploits the resources of the weaker country to enrich its own economy (Popov 2004... by indent. Most of the areas,...
HISTORY
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...conquests and rulers responsible for these conquests. Among the ancient rulers two s stand out one a Greek in Alexander the Great, and the other a Roman in Julius Caesar. Of the two Alexander is more, as he extended Greek influence into vast areas at a very young age. Alexander lived well before and for Julius Caesar he was a ruler to be respected for his exploits. Caesar conquests are comparable to Alexander, but are not equal, for Alexander and his Greek army were capable of taking on armies of the enemy with and coming out victorious with the minimal of losses to themselves. Alexander thus was a far better war tactician than Caesar. However... History Introduction: History is replete with exploits of...
History
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...conquests in the 1500s, several pertinent explanations comeup and there are various essential reasons which drove European civilization to get involved in imperialism and conquests. A historical review of the motivation of imperialism suggests a variety of reasons, broadly classified as economic, political, exploratory, religious and ideological, and the most common reason among them is the economic explanations of imperialism. In the European politics of the 1500s, different nations were motivated to dominate other nations by the need to enlarge and control foreign trade which would serve their insatiable... History In a reflective analysis of the important reasons behind European imperialism and...
World History Before 1500 Chapter 5
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...conquests have resulted in the expansion of some elements of civilization, there are many more accruing from the early occurrences of colonization. Colonialists brought numerous civilization elements to their colonies, which entail changes that are evident in structural, cultural, governance and economic domains (Fernández 74)). For instance, the European colonists instilled there system of rule to the African and American colonies. Additionally, new farming and production methods were spread by the colonialists, which has never emanated from military conquests. Other elements include important civilization tools like introduction of writing. Q2... World History Before 1500 Q1 In as much as military...
Quiz 1
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...Conquests Question Condition of the Byzantine Empire The Byzantine Empire was weak and busy grappling with eminent cracks within its ranks, following endless wars to reclaim vast communities to its control from the West. At the core of the regime, there were challenges of inconsistent policy and lack of formidable resources to stave off external attack. The discontent between the non-observant and non-orthodox factions in the regime seemed to be a common and enduring experience in the society. Government officials in Constantinople disregarded the entire leadership mandated to administer different parts of the Eastern Mediterranean... ?Article Analysis The formation of Christendom and The Early Islamic...
The battle of Yarmuk (636) and the arab conquest of syria and palesine
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...Conquest of Syria and Palestine The victories that Muslim Armies achieved when they battled with the Byzantines helped the latter cease the hold of the Byzantine Empire on Arabia, Palestine and Syria (Kennedy 142). The Muslims gained the upper hand in the important battle of Yarmuk in 636 A.C.E. because of their knowledge with the terrains of the battleground. Despite being outnumbered by the Byzantine Army of Emperor Heraclius, the Muslim Army led by Khalid ibn-al-Walid was able to use strategies to win them full control of the Middle East (Yarmuk 21). One of the deciding factors of these battles aside from the strategies is the increase in numbers of Muslims... ?The Battle of Yarmuk (636) and the Arab...
Alexander The Great as a Military Leader
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...conquests and reigns, the first image that strikes us, is that of Alexander The Great. The epithet attached to him itself speaks volumes about the sheer greatness of Alexander, the King of Macedonia, who went on to conquer most of the most known to Ancient Greeks. Alexander was born in 356 B.C. at Pella, the capital of Macedonia, to King Philip II, the King of Macedonia and Olympias, a princess of Epirus. The prince exhibited brilliance at a young age. He was taught by Aristotle, the great Plato's disciple and he went on to become a military leader... ALEXANDER THE GREAT R.Preeti 13/7/2008 When one contemplates about...
World history and american history
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...conquests alongthe nations in the Middle East mainly occurred between eleventh to fifteenth century that marked the decisive starting point in the long historical process by which Islamic religion became the prominent religion and began to spread throughout the world. By the time their prominent leader Muhammad came to die, the Arabs had already changed from their early disunited tribal groups into a massive united kingdom under one religion(Islamic), one government, military and economic leadership that up-to-date disuniting them has become mission impossible. In sum, the conquests of Islam in the Middle... Q1 Foundation of Middle East, the Origin and the Expansion of Islam The foundation of Islamic...
Quiz 1
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...Conquests Question Condition of the Byzantine Empire The Byzantine Empire was weak and busy grappling with eminent cracks within its ranks, following endless wars to reclaim vast communities to its control from the West. At the core of the regime, there were challenges of inconsistent policy and lack of formidable resources to stave off external attack. The discontent between the non-observant and non-orthodox factions in the regime seemed to be a common and enduring experience in the society. Government officials in Constantinople disregarded the entire leadership mandated to administer different parts of the Eastern Mediterranean... Article Analysis The formation of Christendom and The Early Islamic...
Alexander the Great
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...conquest affected all the territories. Introduction The word ‘great’ did not attribute all the rulers but a few who actuallydeserved the title. Alexander III (356- 323 B.C.) was the great ruler who deserved the term very well. Beginning as the king of Macedonia, he became a great emperor at his thirties and his territory stretched from the Ionian Sea to India. He is considered to be the conqueror of the largest empire in the ancient history. Alexander has to his credit being tutored by the great philosopher Aristotle. “ During their three years together at Mieza, Aristotle taught him ethics and his own views on politics and on the geography of Asia, and perhaps some... ). All the places he...
Pericles and Julius Caesar
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...conquests and subsequent political rule; it argues that the subtle differences in their lives are a testament to the divergent nature of ancient Greek and Roman cultures. Pericles was born in 495 BC in what was considered the Greek Golden Age (Abbott 1998). Similar to Julius Caesar who would emerge a few centuries later, he was a recognized statesman, orator, and general. Also similar to Caesar, Pericles is recognized as having a tremendously influential impact on the culture of which he was apart. In Pericles’ case he has been referred to as the ‘first citizen of Athens’ by his contemporaries for his great and profound... ?Pericles and Julius Caesar Pericles and Julius Caesar have come to be recognized...
Essay Questions:
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...conquests to an end. Again, from 756 AD to 929 AD, Umayyad Dynasty was resumed in Spain (Andalus). Thus, the Umayyads played a much better role in the expansion of the Dar Al-Islam as compared to the Abbasids. The Ottoman Turks conquered Constantinople on 29 May, 1953 and it became the new capital of the Ottoman Empire. Mehmed I had to face much criticism when he proposed to assault... Umayyad vs. Abbasid in Expanding the Dar Al-Islam The Umayyad Caliphate (661-750 AD) reallocated the political hub of Islam from Madina to Syria andthe capital was moved from Kufa to Damascus. The Umayyads expanded the borders of the Dar Al-Islam from Syria to North Africa, Central Asia and Spain in all directions and...
Argument based on one of the controversies discussed in Mitchell, Joseph R and Helen Buss Mitchell, Eds Taking Sides: Clashing v
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...conquests through his shear military genius. This is because he managed to single handedly pull together all the Greek labor... ? Argument based on one of the Controversies discussed in Mitchell, Joseph R and Helen Buss Mitchell Alexander the great is a man who merits his exalted historical reputation. Alexander died very early at the age of thirty-two years whereby his career ended. Alexander commenced his career at the age of twenty when he started working in the field of human action. During his brief career, Alexander engaged in a series of activities that were so bold and brilliant that the world looked at his work with astonishment. Due to this fact alone, people from all corners of the world have...
Mehmed the Conqueror
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...conquest of constatinople, campaigns and the code. This will assist in formulating a background of the research. Freely, John. The Grand Turk: Sultan Mehmet II - Conqueror of Constantinople, Master of an Empire and Lord of Two Seas. london:I B Tauris & Co Ltd. 2009. Print. This is a primary source that depicts Mehmed as a ruler who dominated... East and West from his palace. Freely’s audience covers people who believe in mythical elements in which Mehmet lived. The author talks about numerous endless campaigns and covering their history. Fatih Municipality. Fatih Sultan Mehmet. 2014. Web. 28 October, 2014. This primary source relates with the administrative actions of Mehmed for Ottoman state. The...
Arabic ceramics art
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...conquests in the 600s and combined all countries they conquered into a unitary civilization. Initially, Arabs themselves had minimal art; however, amid the conquests, the Arabs came into contact with flourishing ceramic art of Persia, Syria, and Egypt (Savory 89). The blending of the cultural influences yielded a distinctive form of Arabic ceramic art prominent between the years 800 and 1700. Arab artists developed many techniques, the bulk of which remain still in use today. For instance, Arabs engraved pots... Arabic Ceramics Art Introduction In art history, ceramics art refers to art objects detailing aspects such as tableware, figures, and tiles fashioned from clay plus other raw materials by the...
Analysis of Early Roman civilization
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...conquests where the central ideology was practicality as opposed to philosophers and thinkers like the Greeks. The nature of civilization of the Romans made them doers. For instance, the practicality of the Roman... Analysis of Early Roman civilization Tiber River is a significant mark of Roman civilization as the society grew from the hilly parts of the region at the center of Italian peninsula (Forsythe, 30). Rome civilization began with traders and shepherds who created the republican society where the citizens shared governance. Rome Republic grew and spread its influence to other parts of the Italian peninsula, extending as far as Mediterranean Sea. The Roman civilization began after the conquests...
Native Americans in the Colonial Era
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...conquests in the early American Southeast. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press.... head: Native Americans in the Colonial Era 21st April Native Americans in the Colonial Era The early Indians tribes and the French had good relationship due to establishment of trading bases. For example, in 1674 in the southeastern India Pondicherry was introduced. The French were in conflict with other traders who were interested in the Indian market. For example, the Dutch, British and Portuguese among others were interested in the trade and thus making India to have a state of anarchy due to frequent conflicts. The Huron had a well developed economy due to trade that was started by the Europeans in 1608. Based on...
European Colonization of the Americas
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...conquests proved to be fruitful there are various ways by which the colonization has not really been beneficial to the European countries. This paper helps to discuss how Europe was both weakened and enriched by its colonization in America. The Spanish and the Portuguese were the first to set foot into the Americas and they soon major chunks and expressed control over South America. Soon even the Europeans began to face attacks from other colonists around the world as there grew a fierce competition with respect to capturing territories. Spanish Florida, New Mexico, New England, Acadia, Canada, New Sweden... ? European Colonization of the Americas European Colonization of the Americas The colonization of ...
ASSIGNMENT-4
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...conquests that she wishes her father would make time to celebrate with, while the trash bin she... Drama Analysis for the Play Dubbed Tender Offer ed by Wendy Wasserstein in the year 1991, Tender Offer is a short drama play based on a conversation shared by a girl named Lisa with her father Paul. Set in a dance studio, the play opens with Lisa rehearsing some dance moves by herself when her father arrives on the scene to pick her up on his way home. As the plot unfolds, Lisa reveals how she has grown upset due to his father’s failure to spend some quality time with her. The main theme featured within the play is the importance of maintaining a healthy parent-child relationship despite all the day to day ...
Chapter Six Reading Response
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...conquests and political wars. The two works of art that I responded to most positively were the bronze figure of Siva and the Amber Necklaces of the Eastern Asia. For instance, the bronze figure... CHAPTER 6 READING RESPONSE Throughout my reading assignment of chapter six, I gathered quite a lot of new knowledge.However, two pieces of information were outstanding. Firstly, I got to understand how the ancient societies represented their religious beliefs through art. It served as a way of commemorating important events as well as acknowledging their understanding of nature and natural phenomenon. Secondly, art was a significant tool of generational remembrance of political events characterized by...
Greek city states rise and influence
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...conquests. The earliest recorded evidence of Sparta arises in around 1000 B.C., but it wasn’t until the 6th century B.C. that Sparta began to gain considerable influence and power within Greece (Morris). This period of time is referred to as the Monolithic period. During this period Sparta gradually gained influence through military conquests. In these regards, there are a number of critical battles that greatly contributed to Sparta’s hegemonic power. One of the major conquests in these regards was Sparta’s overtaking of neighboring Tegea, which was one of the most powerful... ?Greek s Rise and Influence One of the most intriguing of the Greek s was Sparta. The Spartan legacy as a warrior culture in...
Greek city states rise and influence
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...conquests. The earliest recorded evidence of Sparta arises in around 1000 B.C., but it wasn’t until the 6th century B.C. that Sparta began to gain considerable influence and power within Greece (Morris). This period of time is referred to as the Monolithic period. During this period Sparta gradually gained influence through military conquests. In these regards, there are a number of critical battles that greatly contributed to Sparta’s hegemonic power. One of the major conquests in these regards was Sparta’s overtaking of neighboring Tegea, which was one of the most powerful... Greek s Rise and Influence One of the most intriguing of the Greek s was Sparta. The Spartan legacy as a warrior culture in...
Alexander the great
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...conquests, Alexander the Great helped in the development of Hellenistic thought. Alexander’s main contribution to the Hellenistic thought rests in his desire for conquest (Stoneman 21... Alexander the Great This is a study about Alexander the Great and his contributions to the Hellenistic thought. More specifically, the study seeks to answer the following questions; what is Hellenistic thought? What are the pros and cons of this way of thinking? What types of cultural exchanges occurred as a result of Alexander the Great’s Hellenistic thought? In the discussion, the study will examine three cultural exchanges. Hellenistic thought refers to conventional and humanistic ethics that can be attributed to a...
Book Review
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...Conquests of Alexander the Great In the preface to his book The Conquests of Alexander the Great, author Waldemar Heckel states, "the aim of this book is to provide an intelligent introduction to the conquests of Alexander the Great (334-323 BC)" (ix). In making this statement and in the comments that follow it, Heckel stresses that the main point of his book is to explore the military and political aspects of Alexanders career particularly in terms of the consequences of actions and the progress of events in general. He very clearly states that it is not intended to be a complete look at Alexanders life, the intimate details... Michael Bales History 101: Survey of Western Civilization I Review of The...
World Literature - AUTHOR STUDY PROJECT: THE PRINCE BY NICCOLO MACHIAVELLI
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...conquest whereby incorporation of the kingdoms may involve dependence on the rules for directions of ruling or may have their laws. Likewise, the author establishes various circumstances that lead to conquests. One of the ways is the conquest by virtue. The point expresses a scenario where a prince excels because of their qualifications in terms of skills and resources. The other is conquest by luck. Power is made possible through the virtues of someone else skills and qualities rather than the one who occupies the post of power. The other conquest is courtesy of criminal activity. Acquisition of power is through unlawful and corrupt deeds (Machiavelli, 2012). References Machiavelli... Study Project:...
Was the conquest of Spanish America an ambivalent conquest?
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...CONQUEST OF SPANISH AMERICA AN AMBIVALENT CONQUEST? In the 1517-1570, there was conquestand colonization that took place in Spain. According to research done by various parties colonization and conquest are not events but processes that affect the victims and the conquerors1. To measure the degree of the change in the victims and the conquerors, it is crucial for one to understand the culture of the conquered society. The Mayan and the Spanish societies underwent a hard period during the colonization process. In this view, the essay develops a clear and concise argument in answering the question “Was the conquest of Spanish American an ambivalent conquest?” Clendinnen discusses the main... WAS THE...
Latin America Conflicts
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...conquests and violence. In the book Born in Blood and Fire: The concise history of Latin America, John Charles Chasteen has argued that Latin America’s problems developed due to its violent origins and history of invasions by foreigners... ? “The fact that the history of Latin America has been full of “blood and fire” is mostly the result of abuses committed by foreign invaders.” It is true that the narrow stretch of land that links Mexico to South America which constitutes Latin America has always been smeared by tragic events leading to thousands of death and conflicts. It is believed that Latin America has conflict in its blood, in other words, its history since the past 500 years has been full of...
History The american promise book. Were the americas discovered or were the conquered? explain
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...conquests lay credence to the claim that the Americas were conquered. The conquest was resource-driven. The European Nations were interested in the wealth and treasures of the Americas. Reference Roark, J. L. (2006). The American Promise: FourthEdition. Boston: Bedford/ st Martins.... Were the Americas discovered or conquered? Christopher Columbus, a Spaniard who is claimed to have discovered the Americas in 1492 was on a voyage to find a new route to the Spice Islands when he chanced upon the Americas, discovering the new lands to the western world of the period. Using this knowledge the European nations led by Spain and Portugal made several expeditions to the Americas to explore prospects in the new...
Assignment
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...conquests and rather a process of “continuous conversion” (Cardini, 4). Also the halt in the expansion could have been due to the tiredness and absence of energy in the invaders, which prevented them from progressing further. As observed by Cardini, “it has been claimed that, without Poitiers and the heroism of Charles Martel, the name of Allah would be called by the muezzin over the dreaming spires of Oxford, the Koran would be studied in that famous university and the history of the world would have been quite different” (Cardini, 4). However, later examination reveals... 1) The predicament faced by Riccoldo da Montecroce was the sufferings of the Christians and the victory of the Muslims in Baghdad....
GALLERY REPORT
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...conquests of King Alfonso of Portugal. Though it was woven five centuries earlier by Flemish weavers, the distinctness represented by the value of the hues are still apparent in the featured soldiers’ details. Secondly, the Sculpture Garden showcases quite an ambience with its impressive design and horticulture splendor. The harmony of the lines in its physical structure complement the natural variety of the plants. It’s open lawns, central pool with a spouting fountain, and highlighted sculptures makes it ideal for families to enjoy visual elements of design. With the interaction of different media in an open-air atmosphere, unity is enigmatically observed. Clearly... Report The Washington National...
Wars and Attempts at Territorial Expansion are Often the Result of States' Rational Efforts to be Secure
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...conquests do not just happen, they do happen for a reason. For example, France entered, into war with a goal, to recapture its lost territories just to intensify their security, and for sure it was forthcoming. It is thus beyond a reasonable doubt that most nations believed that, more territory meant more power and more security. This implies that in as much as the First World War was alliance based with nations coming into the support of others... Task Wars and attempts at territorial expansion are often the result of s’ rational efforts to be secure Introduction Ancient times were marred with numerous wars and efforts by enemies to expand their territories past the provisional boundaries. Numerous...
The Spread of Religion
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...conquests, the Inquisition; all demonstrate the ability of cruel men to vent their angst and justify inhumanity in the name of God... YOUR FULL YOUR The Spread of Religion Was religion a force of peace and stability or of discord during the eraActually, it was both. For the people in Western Europe, the Christian position on peace and rule of law did provide a measure of stability for society. As the church institutionalized, it also provided a model for administrative efficiency. Similarly in the Middle East, where Islam was uncontested, it provided a social structure and stable behavioral code. When the two came together, however, religion was certainly not peaceful. The crusades, the Islamic...
Discuss the expansion of Romes empire.
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...conquests were the chief source of wealth for the Roman Empire. Therefore, Romans were fond of war because conquered territories were a source of material wealth and slaves (Smith, 38). Constant success of the Roman military in wars is attributed to the skilled and experienced legionnaires of the Roman Army. Unlike any other army then, Roman Legions were highly... Expansion of the Roman Empire In the 8th Century BC, the Roman republic was a small region in an Italian peninsula. By the 4thCentury AD, the previously small republic had grown into the largest empire the world has even known. Expansion of the empire’s geographical borders is associated with the Roman military. Apparently, Roman military...
Western civilization
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...conquests and treaties. This is in line with the western perspective of international politics and seeking state interests which is deeply hegemonic in nature... Western Civilization Channels of Distribution Number Introduction Since by cultivating some specific interpretations of the past, ancient people were able to articulate what they believed to have made their own societies unique, building on personal mastery of historical and literary issues have left me thoroughly persuaded that sources such as Exodus, Homer’s Odyssey and Herodotus represent a distinctively “western” perspective. The reasons why I am strongly convinced that these aforementioned sources set stage for western socio-cultural,...
Assignment
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...conquests that defined his rule... Instruction: Task: History Assignment. Question Private property is property that belongs to a private party, and not any governmental organization. Private property ownership refers to the legal ownership of items such as land, buildings and any other tangible or intangible item such that the owners are the only ones who have the sole legal right to undertake any activity with the property. In most instances, the owners can either be individuals or firms, but the major characteristic for private property is the fact that the owners are the only ones with total legal right regarding any activity that involves the property in question. This legitimate designation of...
How Alexander the Great Influenced Current History
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...conquests, “The culture of Greece was the broadcast throughout the entire Middle East” (Greer, 1977, p.77). Alexander also realized the importance of flourishing economy through development of trade and commerce. He, therefore, was devoted to building ports and his fresh conquests proved...  Alexander the Great was the famous king of Macedon, an ancient kingdom in the northern Greece. He was born in 356BC and Phillip II of Macedon and Queen Olympia are known to be his father and mother. Alexander was taught by Aristotle until the age of 16 years and at a very young age of 20 he succeeded his father and took over the throne after he was assassinated. By the age of 30 Alexander had developed one of the...
Pacific Northwest History
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...conquests and the mixing of diverse racial groups and is generally conceded to have begun when Europeans first arrived there in 1528 (ibid. 5). Early travelers to the region noted the charred and blackened landscapes, a result of deliberate burning. An account by the peripatetic David Douglas, a Scot employed by the Horticultural... Pacific Northwest History-II 05 August 2009 Origins of the Pacific Northwest First of all, the Pacific Northwest region of the US is sometimes hard to define in a precise manner. This is due to the region having easy access when coming from the outside but also difficulty moving around within the region due to the abundance of physical barriers inside it. Boundaries of...
History: Foundations of Western Civilization
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...conquests of Phillip while Hellenistic refers to people during the period after Alexander the Great’s conquests. The Hellenic architecture consisted primarily of pyramids while the new architectural types of theaters were found. Less time was spent on temples. Streets were laid out is straight lines in the era instead of just developing naturally... Compare Hellenic and Hellenistic Greece. In your comparison, pick two or three significant areas (culture, political and economic s, war, gender, family life, religion, art/architecture, etc.). Discuss key similarities and differences, and the reasons for each similarity and/or difference you see. Hellenic were the people who lived in Greece before the conque...
Maccabees
2 pages (500 words) , Download 1 , Book Report/Review
...conquests of the Maccabees and the consequent elevation of Judaism in Judea. 1 Maccabees is the first of the books. It begins approximately around 175 B. C. and covers the entire revolt until 134 B.C. The book was originally written in Hebrew but is now available only... 1 Maccabees The books of Maccabees are a series of books that are included in the Old Testament Apocrypha. They chronicle the revolt of the Maccabeus family against the suppression of Jew culture by the Greeks. The family consisted of the great Jew leader, Mattathias and his sons; Judas, Jonathan, Simon; and his grandson, John Hyrcanus. They are also called Hasmoneans or Asmoneans after their ancestor, Hashmon. It is the history of the...
Compare the way the Aztecs dealt with Cortes to the way the Powhatans dealt with the English.
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...conquests, there were numerous casualties. White notes that during the Aztec’s resistance, “over 2,000 Tlaxcalan soldiers and 500 Spaniards were killed in the battle” (467). The Powhatans riddled the colonists with arrows, killing 347 settlers. Divine intervention was also used to fight off the enemy. The soothsayers informed Aztec emperor Montezuma II as well as the people of calamities to come. The Powhatans hatched the plan to attack the English settlers based on their religion. In both native groups, the captives were... Comparison of the way the Aztecs dealt with Cortes to the way the Powhatans dealt with the English The paper discusses the similarities between the way the Aztecs dealt with...
ART EDUCATION ACROSS CULTURES
2 pages (500 words) , Research Paper
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...conquests during warfare for instance, the hornbill article and faith in its image was employed on invocation at the high aim of obtaining extraordinary power to intimidate and eventually subdue the enemies. In particular, the custom of Iban’s Gawai Kenyalang acquired such belief for the purpose of attaining success in raiding and headhunting... Art Education Across Cultures: The ‘Hornbill Figure’ The Hornbill Figure, known to be Tenyalang or Kenyalang in the context of Iban nomenclature for the bird species, has essentially been the chief subject of interest among the Iban carvers of Sarawak, Malaysia (Davenport). It was during the period between the 19th and the 20th centuries that the Iban people...
16th Century Travel
1 pages (250 words) , PowerPoint Presentation
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...conquests, expansion of land and authority and a period of more discoveries and inventions. Throughout all of these, people in the 16th century walked, sailed, rode horses or traveled in carriages. Moving from one place to another on foot was the first ever means of traveling and remained a common way of transport in the 16th century. Where it was the primary way of getting around, walking was eventually reserved to traveling very short distances. With the domestication of animals that can bear people on their backs... 16th Century Transportation Before the Industrial Revolution, there were a few changes in the modes of traveling from the period the wheel was invented. The 16th century was a time of...
Hellenistic Art
2 pages (500 words) , Personal Statement
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...conquests. Due to the rapid expansion of empire, art during the time was made to realign itself with the realities of a vastly larger territory and diverse populace. This is not to say that a type of artistic multi-culturalism pervaded and diminished traditional Greek influence from the arts; quite the opposite is true. Of special interest is the way that art was presented within the 5 smaller kingdoms that resulted after the death of Alexander... Section/# Hellenistic Art Question A unique component of Hellenistic art is that it employed a type of universality that was flavored with elements of the multi-cultural influences that were a very real part of life as a result of Alexander the Greats’...
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