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Kidney Transplantation
6 pages (1500 words)
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...Transplantation - Kidney Transplantation Brief History Kidney Transplantation is a process in which a non-functioning or diseased kidney is replaced with a functioning kidney. The late 1950s saw the development of modern transplantation techniques. The clinical and experimental transplantation was extensively exploited in the early 1950s and the first two decades of the 20th century. Joseph Murray and colleagues performed the first successful renal transplant in 1954 at Boston, USA. With no effective immunosuppressant therapies, Murray was aware that tissue rejection would complicate matters for the recipient; therefore in order to minimize the chances of rejection Murray performed... the...
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Tooth transplantation
5 pages (1250 words)
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...Transplantation The history of tooth transplantation s back to the early days of the Egyptian slaves who were forced to give their teeth to the Pharaohs. Allotransplantation , the transplantation of a tooth from one person to another , was eventually abandoned because of histocompatibility issues. This procedure was replaced by autogenous tooth transplantation in which a tooth is transplanted from one location to another within the same person. M.L. Hale documented autogenous tooth transplantation for the first time in 1954. Studies over past decade indicate a high success rate of this procedure and the principles of Hale’s techniques are still followed today. Patients must... Full 21 March, Tooth...
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Organ Transplantation
6 pages (1500 words)
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...transplantation: the legal and ethical issues in presumed consent al affiliation Organ Transplantation: the Legal and Ethical Issues in Presumed Consent Organ transplantation involves the removal of internal organs from one person, and the transfer of those organs to another person whose organs are failing. For transplantation to take place, organs can be procured from both living and the dead donors, although the latter seems to produce higher volume transplantation than the former. However, when choosing the organ to be donated it is highly important to consider whether the donor is alive or deceased....
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Organ Transplantation/Replacement Technologies
7 pages (1750 words)
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...Transplantation/Replacement Technologies" Definition of the problem One of the leading causes of disability followed by death involves failure of organ(s) to function in an appropriate manner. Major organs like heart, lungs, liver, kidneys and pancreas play vital roles in the metabolic processes, survival and proliferation of an individual. Impairment affects the normal performance of the organ, causing altered metabolism or cessation of the appropriate function. The impact of organ dysfunction, affected by cancer or failure to carry out the desired function efficiently paves the way for replacement of the organ or organ transplantation (Cascalho & Platt, 2005). With the increase in the life...
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LOVE M10 Transplantation and Technology
3 pages (750 words)
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...Transplantation and Technology Paper First Middle initial and of Prof. First and of lecturer February 18, 2012 Globalization has proved to be beneficial and harmful to the health of people when it comes to the area of tissue/organ transplantation and technology. Specific examples have been highlighted below: Tissue/organ transplantation: Tissue/organ transplantation involves the removal of healthy tissues or organs from donor and placing it in a recipient to replace a damaged or absent organ. It is typically the only treatment available for end-stage organ failure such as kidney or liver failure (World Health Organization, n.d.). Benefit: Globalization has helped organ transplantation... to...
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Kidney Dialysis and Kidney Transplantation
4 pages (1000 words)
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...Transplantation" INTRODUCTION Kidney failure is one of the most common and most lethal type of organ failure. The kidneys, a pair of bean-shaped organs acts as filters for blood and other body fluids. Without the kidneys, the body will succumb to the toxins it encounters everyday. Toxins filtered by the kidneys are excreted out of the body through the urinary system mixed with urine. Toxins and other harmful substances, come from various sources such as the environment (in the air, water and other environmental factors), from our food especially those laced with high amounts of preservatives and artificial flavours, from the liquids that we drink... "A Comparison of Kidney Dialysis and Kidney...
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Biological Cloning and Nuclear Transplantation
3 pages (750 words)
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...transplantation... , in which the genetic material from a given cell is inserted into the host. In this case, the host is an unfertilized egg whose genetic material has been removed through enucleation process. The biological process of nuclear transplantation is whereby scientists derive a cell from an adult animal they wish to clone. The genome of the animal is contained in the nucleus of this derived cell. Genome is the DNA that has instructions to create a new individual. The next stage in this process is taking an unfertilized egg from the female of the same species, and removing its nucleus (Mann, 2003, p.1). The scientists then put the nucleus into the egg; thus,...
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Ethics of Organ Donation and Transplantation
8 pages (2000 words)
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...Transplantation Defined 2 History of Organ Donation and Transplantation 3 Organ Donation and Transplantation in the United States 5 Moral and Ethical Issues in Procurement and Distribution 5 Conclusion 8 References 10 Appendices 11 Introduction The issue of organ donation and organ transplantation has become a crucial issue in today's society. Statistics show that as of this month, there are 88,565 patients waiting for an organ donor in the United States alone (See Appendix). It is undeniable that there is a substantive shortage of organs for transplant. Such reality points... Table of Contents Introduction Organ Donation and...
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Describe the process of graft rejection in transplantation
2 pages (500 words)
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...Transplantation Introduction: Transplantation is a method that can be used to treat any malfunctioning of an organ within the body by transfer of cells, tissues or organs from one place to another (Malhotra, 2011). Graft rejection of transplantation has been obtained as one of the most significant barriers in the process (Graft Rejection, n.d.). The present study focuses on understanding of the process of graft rejection in transplantation. Graft Rejection in Transplantation: Graft rejection in human bodies may be classified as hyperacute rejection, acute rejection or chronic rejection. Hyperacute rejection that is categorized by thrombotic occlusions and haemorrhage... Process of Graft Rejection in...
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Research paper for Final exam Organ transplantation in Canada
5 pages (1250 words)
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...Transplant Introduction Organ transplant is a treatment mechanism that involves removing an organ from the body of a donor and implanting it into that of a recipient. Stakeholders in the field of health have overtime reaffirmed that organ transplants are routinely carried out due to the failure of the corresponding organ within the body. Implying that a patient is to be subjected to a kidney transplant in case his or her kidney is deemed to have failed, and is not in a position to perform its normal functions. Many organ failures often come about due to illnesses or injuries suffered by the patients. In as much as most of the patients are normally expected to wait... Philosophy Research Paper: Organ...
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A comparison of Kidney Dialysis and Kidney Transplantation
4 pages (1000 words)
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...Transplantation” INTRODUCTION Kidney failure is one of the most common and most lethal type of organ failure. The kidneys, a pair of bean-shaped organs acts as filters for blood and other body fluids. Without the kidneys, the body will succumb to the toxins it encounters everyday. Toxins filtered by the kidneys are excreted out of the body through the urinary system mixed with urine. Toxins and other harmful substances, come from various sources such as the environment (in the air, water and other environmental factors), from our food especially those laced with high amounts of preservatives and artificial flavours, from the liquids that we drink... A Comparison of Kidney Dialysis and Kidney...
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Introduction and Annotated Bibliography: Argumentative Essay on the Sale of Organs for Transplantation
5 pages (1250 words)
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...transplantation. In this context, World Health Organization (WHO) may be quoted, that is, “organ transplantation is often the only treatment for end state organ failure, such as liver and heart failure. Although end stage renal disease patients can be treated through other renal replacement therapies, kidney transplantation is generally accepted as the best treatment both for quality of life and cost effectiveness” (par... Paper In contemporary times, the human race has the advantage of enhanced access to a varied variety as well as access toa diverse range of food and medications. However, more chronic illnesses continue to emerge in increasing patterns and necessitate interventions implicating organ...
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Immunology essay:Discuss current devepolments, and the importance of the major histocompatibility complex(MHC), in transplantation
12 pages (3000 words)
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...transplantation, we should first get to know what immunology actually is. So starting with immunology, it is that sort of study that typically deals with the resistance against various diseases with the immune system. Pathak and Palan (2005) found that it is the study of human immune system and also it is the field of medicine that has a relation with treatment of those diseases which are related to the immune system. Various types of immunology include clinical immunology, developmental immunology... Introduction In the life that we live, health is considered as that most important aspect of consideration for every human being. When the health of a person will be perfect, he will be able to cop with all ...
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Compare and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different sources of haemapoietic stem cells in transplantation
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...transplantation can be defined as a process by which stem cells from the patient or a donors bone marrow are removed and re-infused into the patient to produce healthy blood cells (Australian Academy of Science, 2001). Stem cell transplants may be allogeneic, syngeneic or autologous. The most common sources for such transplants are bone marrow, blood and umbilical cord or placental stem cells (Gross & Johnson, 1998. ) II. Application of SCs in Transplantation Type of disorders treated The following table lists the established and emerging uses for stem cell transplantation (Lennard & Jackson,...
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Renal transplants
3 pages (750 words)
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...Transplants The essay aims to address the trends of renal transplants worldwide, the procedures used in renal transplantation, the outcome of the procedure to the patient, the annual incidence, and the new trends in research and renal transplant procedures. Renal Transplants Transplants Worldwide Renal transplantation started in 1954 when Ronald Herrick donated a kidney to his identical brother, Richard. Joseph Murray was their surgeon was the first to perform successful living kidney transplantation Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts....
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Critical analysis of a qualitative study
3 pages (750 words)
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...Transplant Surgery and Patient Care” by Linda A. Evans. Problem Statement This study refers to the experiences and impact of facial transplantation on health care givers and patients (Shanmugarajah et al, 2012). The exposure of healthcare team member to the process of facial transplantation may have ethical (Vasilic et al, 2008), long-term personal and professional impact on caregivers and, consequently affect patient care (Evans, 2013). The clinical or medical impact... that healthcare team members can derive from continued exposure to facial transplantation led to the study. The research problem relates to the fact that no conclusive research explores the personal,...
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Clinical immunology
2 pages (500 words)
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...transplantation has become a therapeutic modality to treat patients with end-stage disease. However, inadequate precaution,illegal organ trade, and higher presence of diseases such as HIV, hepatitis, and malaria present greater health safety dangers to both organ donors and recipients in developing countries (Wikipedia, 2006). In recent years although 1-year survival after organ transplantation has improved markedly over the last 15 years, there has been little success in reversing the decline in long-term graft and patient survival that is seen in recipients of any organ transplant, in whom the prevalence of morbidities such as systemic hypertension, diabetes mellitus... Clinical Immunology Organ...
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Pulmonary Rehabilitation
1 pages (250 words)
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...Transplantation” by Carolyn L. Rochester. The article considers patients that are recovering from lung transplantation or lung-volume-reduction surgery, LVRS as people with advanced chronic respiratory disease. Because of their severe ventilation limitation and disability, they are likely to present postoperative and preoperative complications. Therefore, the article seeks to determine the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation for such patients. To achieve this objective, Rochester (2008) analyzes various relevant secondary... Pulmonary Rehabilitation: Article Summary This paper gives a summary of the article, “Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Patients Who Undergo Lung-Volume-Reduction Surgery or Lung...
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Concise scientific report on mobilisation and harvest of haemopoietic stem cells
2 pages (500 words)
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...transplantation (HSCT) has been comprehensively exploited as a therapeutic and research modality. Disorders of the haematopoietic system and immune system use the haematopoietic stem cell transplant procedure. In metabolic disorders, the procedure is used for replacement of enzymes. Most medical centres prefer mobilising stem cells from the bone marrow than peripheral blood because of its advantages. The gastrointestinal and central nervous system were damaged by irradiation as shown by studies in mid-20th century. Transplantation of genetically identical marrow or the animals... al affiliation Mobilisation and harvest of haematopoietic stem cells In the current patient care, haematopoietic stem cell...
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Critical review of this paper in 150 words only
1 pages (250 words)
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...Transplant Patients B. Ardehali, B. Baluch, A. Furnham, M. Zakkar, G. Williams Transplantationsmedizin, Psychological Variables in Renal Transplantation 2003, Vol. 15 This article seemed to be meticulously planned out in terms of the procedure, as the instrumentation used was extensive. However, much of the analysis was assumed from the scores derived from the participants. Although little doubt can be cast on the validity of the results, it would have been more interesting if the patients’ insights were probed using more qualitative methods such as interviews. Then, first hand experiences can be recounted... A Pilot Investigation on Psychological Variables in Pre- and Post-renal First Attempt...
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Discussion 19
1 pages (250 words)
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...transplantation of the body part of one person in another person. For example, if there is a need to replace the kidney of a person, the kidney of another person will be used for replacement. The key point here is that in autograft... Your full full March 04, 3. Difference between Allograft and Autograft The difference between an allograft is that in autograft, surgeons take a tissue from one part of the body in order to place it in place of an injured tissue of the body of the same person. For example, if there is a need to replace a tissue due to an injury, the patient’s own tissue will be used for replacement. This process is fast in healing and safe as compared to allograft. Allograft refers to the...
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Transplant
5 pages (1250 words)
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...transplant was experimented on animals and humans as early as the 18th century but faced massive failures owing to the lack of current technology, knowledge, and expertise. In 1954, the Dr. Joseph Murray performed a kidney transplant on identical twins allowing for no immune rejection winning him the Nobel Prize and allowing the patient to live for eight years. The first heart transplant was conducted in 1967, but the patient died of Pneumonia from the anti-rejection drugs that weakened the immune system. The main cause of death for organ transplant patient in the following years through to the 1970’s was poor anti-rejection drugs, which changed by the end of 1970’s when better... Introduction Organ...
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Transplant Tourism and Life Prolonging Services Affect on the Economy
2 pages (500 words)
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...Transplant Tourisms Effect on the Economy  Transplant tourism refers to the practice of travelling from one country to another for the sake of organ transplantation. Indeed, this tread is very rampant in the United States of America where patients travel to India, China, or the Philippine for solid organ transplantation (Fitzgibbons, 2012). This is because of the shortage of available organs, increase of patients, and the lack of donors. Hence, many patients result to transplant tourism as the best option. However, there has been critics of this practice and the although American doctors do not condone all...
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Distributive Justice: Access; Rationing; Futility
2 pages (500 words)
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...Transplantation is no more an impossible or tedious work. Nowadays many hospitals provide facilities for transplanting organs. Most of the organs of humans can now be transplanted, thanks to the vast development in medical sciences. The most common transplant is the process of transplanting the heart. Generally if a patient is diagnosed with an organ failure, the concerned hospital then decides whether that organ could be replaced. If it is found to be possible, the hospital then takes the further step of helping the patient for a transplant. The doctors will try and inform other hospitals and some service organizations to locate people who... DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE: ACCESS, RATIONING, FUTILITY Organ...
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Bone Marrow Transplant & Donation
7 pages (1750 words)
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...Transplantation and Donation The of Your Paper Bone Marrow Transplantation and Donation Social Security Number: Course Name, Number, and Section Number: Name of Instructor: Bone Marrow Transplantation and Donation Bone marrow transplantation has been described as a heroic management of some devastating diseases like leukemia, lymphomas and aplastic anemia (Scales, 2008). With years of research and improvement in procedure, this surgery has more hurdles to cross as significant morbidity has been associated with it still. Intensive care is needed by about 40% of patients. The complications requiring ICU care are respiratory or hepatic or neurological problems (Scales, 2008). ICU stay would... ?Bone Marrow...
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Transplant
1 pages (250 words)
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...transplantation does not advantage the donor beyond increasing their self-esteem. The socioeconomic advantages andthe recipient’s increase quality of life justifies the theoretical risk to the donor. The Ethical Council of the Transplantation Society emphasizes on the prevention of commercialism for ethical as well as for medical reasons. Financial incentives or rewarded gifting to compensate the donation is not advisable (Bruzzone et al., 2005). Q. 2: The advantage is that it provides adequate proof that the donor wants to donate the organs which is important to convince the relatives. The disadvantage is that it causes people to think about donating organs without... Q Ans. Living nephrectomy for...
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Regenerative medicine course
7 pages (1750 words)
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...transplantation and the advantages/disadvantages of islet vs. pancreas transplantation? Pancreas transplantation has been proven to have positive effect on the quality of life among diabetic patients and restoration of physical activity. Another advantage of pancreas transplantation is that it prevents recurrence of diabetic nephropathy. Pancreas transplantation has been associated with numerous risks including substantial risk for cardiovascular disease. Pancreas transplantation patients are also exposed immunosuppression related risk of opportunistic infection, cancer and cardiovascular... ? Regenerative Medicine Regenerative Medicine Question a) Define systeolic heart failure Systolic heart failure...
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Dissertation proposal::Psychological Effects of Organ Donor Policies on the Organ Donor and His Family
4 pages (1000 words)
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...transplantation. The process of organ transplantation involves harvesting a necessary organ from a live donor or human cadaver to a patient in need of the healthy organ. Such process entails much ethical... consideration as the procedure is very delicate and complicated. Policies have been established and implemented before such a procedure can take place. Although policies have been set for the benefit of both organ donors and donees, it is inevitable that consideration of prospective cases need careful study before final decisions can be done with regards to the appointment of organs to donees. This means that time and money will have to be spent and both donors and donees wait sometimes...
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Organ Transplant
4 pages (1000 words)
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...Transplant s One of the most important milestones in the history of medical sciences is that of organ transplantation.Organ failure and severely damaged organs especially those that are essential for survival would have been the cause for death in many patients if transplant technology was not available. Organ transplant refers to replacement of a damaged organ or tissue with freshly harvested living organ or tissue. Not all organs are eligible for transplantation. The major organs that are eligible for transplant surgeries include kidney, heart, liver, lung and pancreas. In the U.S alone over 28,000 patients under transplant surgeries and over half of these surgeries are kidneys transplants...
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Research about human organ donation
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...transplantation in modern society by Eduard Zirm at 1905, who performed the human corneal transplant at Olomouc Eye Clinic located in modern Czech Republic, the society has been debating religious, moral, ethical and other considerations of this surgical procedure. There is also ongoing debate regarding various ethical considerations of organ transplantation all over the world. Almost all countries have some type of rules and regulations regarding the organ transplantation. Some of them are very stringent, which has been made after various types of human rights... and OrganTransplantation: Ethical issues, regulation and illegal sales of human organs. Introduction Since the first successful organ transpla...
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Organ Donation in USA
6 pages (1500 words)
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...transplantation, organ donation is linked to unpaid giving. A donor should not donate an organ to realize material gain. This paper will discuss the manner in which the issue of organ transplantation has spread to different corners of the world, and the ways in which the popularity of the practice has led to increased reliance on organ transplantation, particularly among patients with incurable medical conditions. The paper shows that the effectiveness and reliability of the organ transportation practice is highly dependent on the human development index (HDI) of a given country. Advanced countries have managed to create a balance... Organ Donation in the USA Affiliation Since the start of human kidney...
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Psychological Effects of Organ Donation on the Organ Donor
2 pages (500 words)
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...transplantation involves harvesting a necessary organ from a live donor or human cadaver to a patient in need of the healthy organ. Such process entails much ethical consideration as the procedure is very delicate and complicated. It is a procedure that can put the organ donor and/or recipient at risk of death or other dangerous complications if conditions are not appropriate and in the hands of an incapable physician. There is a scarcity of studies on the psychological effects of organ transplantation on the recipient of the organ (Schindler, 1981; Sharp, 2000... ), but a dearth on the psychological effects on the living donor and the next of kin of cadaveric donors. This study will...
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Psychological Effects of Organ Donation on the Organ Donor
2 pages (500 words)
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...transplantation involves harvesting a necessary organ from a live donor or human cadaver to a patient in need of the healthy organ. Such process entails much ethical consideration as the procedure is very delicate and complicated. It is a procedure that can put the organ donor and/or recipient at risk of death or other dangerous complications if conditions are not appropriate and in the hands of an incapable physician. There is a scarcity of studies on the psychological effects of organ transplantation on the recipient of the organ (Schindler, 1981; Sharp, 2000... Psychological Effects of Organ Donation on the Organ Donor and His Family A Dissertation Proposal Background The process of organ...
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Commercialization of Organ Transplants
5 pages (1250 words)
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...Transplants Organ transplantation is a real breakthrough in health care service. However, it becomes more and more difficult to save people using this method because of a shortage of organs for transplantation. Commercialization of this process is one of the ways to increase donations and save many lives. In this paper possible positive and negative consequences as well as ethical issues of organ sale legalization are discussed. Commercialization of Organ Transplants Nowadays the development of technologies has made it possible to raise the standards of medicine to a higher level. Earlier people with fatal diseases which caused failures of vital organs... Pros and Cons of Commercialization of Organ...
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Stem Cells
5 pages (1250 words)
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...transplantation for blood cancer. The discussion aims to unearth the scope of stem cell therapy in curing blood cancer. So, this research work aims to put forth balanced exploration and discussion on the scope and usability of stem cells within medical field. Stem Cells The most important characteristic of stem cells is the potential... ? Stem Cells School Affiliation This research work explores the scenario of stem cell research and unveils the scope of different typesof stem cells within medical field. To be specific, this research work explores the regenerative medical purpose, treatment of deadly diseases, and research purpose of stem cells. This research work discusses the scope of bone-marrow...
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Transplant immunologyorgan rejection
2 pages (500 words)
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...transplantation is extremely hot nowadays, since there appeared a new way of saving human lives. But there are still many problems concerning the procedure and the result of such surgery. The most harmful of them is transplant rejection, as rejection of transplant organs is the main barrier of transplantation today. "Transplant rejection is when a transplant recipient's immune system attacks a transplanted organ or tissue. Graft-versus-host-disease is a condition that can occur following bone marrow transplant. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure to transplant healthy bone marrow into a patient whose bone marrow is not functioning properly"(Medical It occurs as a Encyclopedia... The problem of...
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Organ Transplant
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...TRANSPLANT A Research Paper on Organ Transplant Organ Transplant Organ transplantation is considered as one of the most significant contributions of medical science to the human race. It is a medical procedure that is defined as the ‘surgical removal of an organ from one person to another person’ which is needed in situations such as organ failure or organ damage caused by illness or injury. The process of transplantation can be applied to different organs such as liver, kidney, pancreas, heart, lung and intestine (United Network for Organ Sharing, 2011). The research paper is aimed to present the definition and the process of organ transplantation. In addition, a focus... on the benefits and...
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Artificial liver device
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...transplant. This study was done to identify and compare the results of different studies that tested for the affectivity, as well as the limitations, of artificial liver devices (ALDs). It was also performed to explore the principles governing ALDs, as well as to elucidate the steps for its construction. The results showed that ALD was an effective adjunct to liver transplantation, and can be used as a temporary replacement for damaged livers while awaiting transplantation. Although the results were... ?Artificial Liver Device Chronic liver disease is the seventh leading cause of death in the US. Donor organs are running short, and there are approximately 17,000 people waiting in line to get a liver...
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Nucleoside Analogue
3 pages (750 words)
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...transplantation Hepatitis B Prophylaxis with Combination Oral Nucleoside and Nucleotide Analog Therapy S. Saab, S. Desai, D. Tsaoi, F. Durazoa,S. Hana, A. McClune, C. Holt, D. Farmer, L. Goldstein and R. W. Busuttil Article Summary The most common strategy for thwarting Hepatitis B recurrence in the liver transplant patient is using a combination of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIg) along with an oral antiviral agent like lamivudine. This strategy has been proven very effective and significantly reduces the hepatitis B reinfection in liver transplant patients. The patient survival rate increases considerably. Due to this procedure, the...
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Organ Transplants
7 pages (1750 words)
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...Transplants Cause Inequalities within Societies Introduction The very prospect of buying, selling or donating body parts appears to be repulsive and indignant. However, one may argue on the other hand that premature death that could have been averted by receiving an organ is also against the dignity of human life. The question now is not whether organ transplantation is against human dignity, but rather how it can affect human lives and societies. This is because organ transplantation is in such great demand that there is a thriving black market to meet the growing demand and counteract the low supplies obtained via organ donations. If the black market is analyzed, it is seen... 11 September Organ...
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Luekemia
2 pages (500 words)
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...transplantation is now used to treat patients with leukemia. This involves the use of high doses of drugs... 10 February 2008 Leukemia The National Cancer Institute defines leukemia as the "cancer that startsin blood-forming tissue such as bone marrow and causes large number of blood cells to be produced and enter the bloodstream." Thus, leukemia is often referred to as cancer of the blood or bone marrow. In the United States, this disease is becoming more prevalent. It is estimated that during 2007, there are 44,240 new cases of leukemia and death caused totaled to 21,790. (National Cancer Institute 2). Leukemia has been pathologically and clinically classified into two categories namely chronic and ac...
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Ethical issue in health about baby born from transplanted uterus
6 pages (1500 words)
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...Transplanted Uterus Ethical Issue in Health about Baby Born From Transplanted Uterus Introduction Uterus transplantation has emerged in the past decade as one of the most probable solutions to the issues of infertility or Absolute Uterine Factor Infertility (AUFI) in women (Ozkan, et al., 2013). For several years, doctors have been researching on the possibility of a successful uterus transplantation, results of which culminated in a successful transplantation processes in Sweden. The successful transplantation has opened up a new approach in treating infertility in women by using the latest technologies in biomedicine. Nevertheless, the progress made... Ethical Issue in Health about Baby Born From...
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Therapies used to prevent rejection of transplanted tissue
4 pages (1000 words)
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...transplanted tissue Therapies used to prevent rejection of transplanted tissue Transplant rejection transpires when the recipient’s immune system rejects the transplanted tissues (Nather, 2001:553). In the work compiled by Nather (2001:553), transplant rejection has been a characteristic of a majority of transplants, but rejection can be minimized by defining the exact molecular semblance between the recipient and the donors. This, according to Nather (2001:553), can be done using immunosuppressant medicines after transplant has taken place. This essay shall attempt to assess the various therapies that are used to prevent rejection of transplanted tissues... ? Therapies used to prevent rejection of...
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Lung Transplant for Patients with Cystic Fibrosis
7 pages (1750 words)
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...TRANSPLANTS (for patients with cystic fibrosis) ID Number: of of School (University) Estimated Word Count: 1,927 Date of Submission: December 31, 2011 LUNG TRANSPLANTS FOR PATIENTS WITH CF Introduction Cystic fibrosis is a recessive genetic disease due to genetic mutation of the gene that is responsible for regulation of the bodys sweat, digestive juices and mucus. The particular gene is called the protein cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator (or CFTR) and people without cystic fibrosis (CF) have two copies of this specific CFTR gene. Only one CFTR gene is needed for the people to avoid CF and this ailment manifests only when both CFTR genes malfunction. Genetic tests can determine... LUNG...
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Organ Donation- How recipients are chosen and should donors be compensated
2 pages (500 words)
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...transplants occur when the donor dies. In addition, in some cases, the donors may also give one of their kidneys or part of their liver to a recipient. Australia is a nation where most of the organs transplantations are carried out successfully (Benedetti, 21). “People of all ages and background can be used... ? Organ Donation Organ Donation is a procedure, which involves the removal of organs and tissues from a donor, transferring them into another person. Under grave circumstances, an ill or dying person can also donate the organ or tissue. This donation is very imperative because it manages to save the life of another person and furthermore, it can enhance the quality of life. Majority of the...
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Organ black market
5 pages (1250 words)
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...transplantation is recognized as one of the major developments in the history of science and human beings. Transplantation of dead human organs to replace them with new ones helps individuals in extending their lifetime and living a better life as compared to the life they were living with a weak organ. Transplantation has helped individuals and groups because it is very effective and efficient as compared to dialysis treatment. The problem is that all individuals can not benefit from these advantages because there is limited availability of organs for transplantation purposes. People have to stay on waiting lists for years before they may ultimately get... Organ Black Market Introduction Organ...
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Organ donation
9 pages (2250 words)
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...transplantation. Major illnesses may cause major organs of the body to lose their function while accidents may also severely damage organs inhibiting them from serving the human body and in such cases it becomes immensely important to replace the organ with a new organ through transplantation surgery in order to make sure that the person survives. The organ used as a replacement in the surgery is donated by another human being known as the organ donor. The organ donor may be a cadaver or a live human being. The most important organs that are donated are kidneys, heart, liver... ? Organ Donation s Hundreds of people around the world die every single day because of unavailability of organs for organ...
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Cultural impact on organ donation
4 pages (1000 words)
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...transplants are known as gifts of life and gifts of love. It is a separate matter altogether that all patients will not receive organ donations in times of need. This could be due to cultural restraints, religious beliefs, or a shortage of donor organs. While certain groups of people would not permit themselves to become the selfless donors of organs during their lifetimes or upon death, there are others that do not allow themselves to use donated organs because of individual beliefs, regardless of whether we consider these puritanical or not. Financial considerations also come into play. In poorer parts... Cultural Impact on Organ Donation To people with organ failure anywhere in the world, organ...
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Cystic Fibrosis Transplantaton
8 pages (2000 words)
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...Transplantation Kelly Page of Cincinnati Introduction Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease with no cure at this time. In the United States there are an estimated 30,000 individuals diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis (“About cf,” 2014). Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is associated with issues of the pancreas, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract (Allen & Visner, 2007). There are several medications and airway clearance therapies available to treat Cystic Fibrosis. When the disease process advances to end-stage, one option available is bilateral lung transplantation. Cystic fibrosis is a common recessive disorder most affecting the white people with 1 in 2500 frequency. CF is inheritable... Cystic Fibrosis Lung...
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Lung Transplant in Cystic Fibrosis
6 pages (1500 words)
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...TRANSPLANTS (for patients with cystic fibrosis) ID Number: of of School (University) Estimated Word Count: 1,927 Date of Submission: December 31, 2011 LUNG TRANSPLANTS FOR PATIENTS WITH CF Introduction Cystic fibrosis is a recessive genetic disease due to genetic mutation of the gene that is responsible for regulation of the body's sweat, digestive juices and mucus. The particular gene is called the protein cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator (or CFTR) and people without cystic fibrosis (CF) have two copies of this specific CFTR gene. Only one CFTR gene is needed for the people to avoid CF and this ailment manifests only when both CFTR genes...
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