‘The Crucible’ by Arthur Miller

‘The Crucible’ by Arthur Miller Coursework example
High school
Coursework
Finance & Accounting
Pages 4 (1004 words)
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With specific reference to the closing moments of Acts Two, Three and Four of The Crucible, discuss how Miller charts John Proctor’s psychological journey from outrage and frustration to a sense of moral resolution…

Introduction

The Crucible is known as a parable, this mean there can be a direct link made between the events of the 17th Century witch trials, to the Communist ‘with hunts’ in the United States that occurred at the time Miller wrote the play. The first US production of The Crucible occurred in January 1953, this was a time of the Red Scare where Senator John McCarthy made false allegations of Communism against various people, this particularly affected people in the Arts and film industry who were know to hold more Leftist views. Miller comments that the propaganda of McCarthyism, the Red Scare and Communism “from the far Right was capable of creating not only a terror, but a new subjective reality” (39). Miller speaks of himself being astounded within the McCarthy era by how fear, an “interior and subjective an emotion could have been so manifestly created from without” (40). Miller describes John Proctor as intelligent, physically strong, rationale and stable. With particular reference to his state of mind he’s described as “even tempered” with a “steady manner” (239). Yet, despite this outward appearance there is a sense of him feeling hypocritical from having sinned, and it is said that he “has come to regard himself as a kind of fraud.” (239). He is shown as determined to put an end to any previous relationships with Abigail in a polite but determined manner, this is indicated by the stage directions, “PROCTOR, gently pressing her from him, with great sympathy but firmly” (241). Proctor’s guilt for being disloyal to Elizabeth is show by anger when Abigail mentions her. ...
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