The Holocaust Museam Report

Undergraduate
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History
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Although most individuals can understand explicit actions of hate and abuse, cultural differences can make it much more difficult to observe and curtail. Humans have and will continue to…

Introduction

The Holocaust Museum in Houston, which is free to the public, directs attention to the Jewish Holocaust and its cultural impacts, with respect to the Jewish population that survived in Europe during WWII.
The Museum, through static displays, brings history alive by explaining how the Nazi Party inflicted mayhem and cruelty out of sheer feelings of hatred and abhorrence for the Jews. The museum also takes great care to explain that women, elderly, and over one million children were killed in cold blood, in order to take revenge for the alleged support rendered by some European Jews to the enemies of Germany during WWI. It is believed that nearly six million Jews were massacred by different means during these twelve years, and that other cruelties were inflicted upon other racial communities. Between 1941 and 1945, five to six million Jews were systematically murdered by the Nazi regime, its allies, and its surrogates in Nazi-occupied territories. Yet, despite the extraordinary scale and intensity of this genocide, its prominence in recent decades was far from preordained.
Hatred can be overcome only if an honest, non-political approach is used towards those who may be affected or who may instigate the violence. Hatred, undeclared violence towards others left unchecked, can lead others to disregard their understanding of their own humanity. To dislike somebody or something is understandable; however, to do so in such an intense manner to somebody or something that evokes feelings of anger, hostility, or animosity, is wrong. To know hatred, there first must be an understanding of what forms of hate can influence our actions and the effects on history. Once hatred is identified through education, solutions can be implemented to intervene and negate such actions. The Jewish Holocaust, a depressing subject, helps to shed light on the darkness of humanity in the modern age. Although other holocausts have occurred throughout history, it is often ...
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