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Explain T. Adorno and M. Horkheimer’s critique of the culture industry and discuss whether these are still relevant for understanding cultural production today? - Essay Example

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Masters
Author : bednarbrock
Essay
Journalism & Communication
Pages 4 (1004 words)

Summary

As the name suggest, culture industry refers to production of culture in an industrial setting. Therefore, culture is produced and consumed like any other industrial commodity. commercialisation of culture is a capitalistic idea whose main goal is to maximise profit…

Extract of sample
Explain T. Adorno and M. Horkheimer’s critique of the culture industry and discuss whether these are still relevant for understanding cultural production today?

Therefore, culture is produced and consumed like any other industrial commodity. According to Theodor Adorno, commercialisation of culture is a capitalistic idea whose main goal is to maximise profit. Culture is the slave of the corporate which is used to gain profit. To achieve their goal, the culture on the market must be attractive to the larger segment of the group or society (Adorno & Horkheimer, 1979). Theodor Adorno and Horkheimer have critically analysed the concept of a culture industry. They view the idea as a continuation of a capitalistic system, which aims to reduce cost of production while increasing profit. In a pure capitalistic setting, the factors of production are used efficiently to attain maximum benefits. For example, workers are paid according to their input contribution, which encourage high labour utility. Marxist theory predicted that the capitalist system will eventually fall because it will trigger a social revolution from the exploited workers. The work of the two scholars is pointing out why the social revolution did not happen as anticipated by Marx. Mass media technology is the main factor of production in industrial culture, which includes; use of radio, television and publications. Mass media technology allows information to spread quickly to a large audience (Bottomore, 1984). ...
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