Textual analysis: Aseop's Fables, Narrative and Storytelling

Textual analysis: Aseop
Journalism & Communication
Pages 6 (1506 words)
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Two examples from Aesop’s fables to analyze the basic narrative structure; the oppositions between entities or principles (weak/strong; small/large etc) which are embodied as animals and the moral illustrated by the tale. Aesop’s Fables are collections of moral tales which are believed to have been told by Aesop, a slave and a story teller.


His tales differentiates the right from the wrong, and the wisdom by which one should live his/her life. Aesop’s fables are generally an allegory of short tales which involves fictitious events that occured in the past and generally contain animals who act like humans. From Aesop’s Fables, one learns certain lessons in life that one should abide by, to have a meaningful life. The story of the Ants and the Chrysalis teaches children that appearances are deceptive. The fable The Boy Who Cried Wolf warns children about the dangers and consequences of lying. These tales originate from a time marked by different lives and social rules as compared to that of today, but they are still a very crucial tool for learning about the basic rules of life today for children as well as adults. The entity and the principles are the inbuilt ones in the fairy tale, the fables of the Aesop contains the entity and they are the content which are needed for the fable development and the principles are the underlying morale in the fable, which is the underlying principles in the each of them and they present the moral of the same. The Ant and the Chrysalis tell the tale of an ant and a chrysalis. The moral of the story is that appearance is deceptive and that one should never despise others on the basis of their appearance. ...
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