The Machine Stops by E.M. Forster - Book Report/Review Example

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The Machine Stops by E.M. Forster

Why not have second hand ideas or even tenth-hand. The implications that Forster is making are connected with the reductions of primary sources as conveying knowledge. In fact history does not matter, since the Machine we live in provides us with all necessary wealth and goods. The Machine is not only the place people dwell in, but it is also the source of history itself. Central Committee and a Committee of the Mending Apparatus are in charge of humankind. Forster as a narrator of the story as well as the characters repeatedly use verbs of agency for the machine. It feeds, clothes and houses human beings. It automatically operates and process information and people do not have to strain their inventive skills. The two distinguishable features of the machine are that it takes decisions on its own and that it evolves by itself.
In his attempt to properly depict the probable future, Forster uses expressive language combinations, metaphors and newly coined words. The Machine is explicitly visualized as communication system. Forster tries to predict what it would be like when people start to use "cinemathophote". The use of machines to intermediate the communication between people limits human's perceptions of each other. That is why they no longer require meeting and seeing each other. ...Show more

Summary

In the last chapter of "The machine stops" by E.M. Forster, "The homeless" Forster present the imaginable future of modern humankind, which becomes literally and figuratively controlled both physically and spiritually of the Machine. The key image of the Machine overtakes all human activities and electronically directs thoughts and actions and all various aspects of daily life.
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