Love in Mary Shelleys Frankenstein - Book Report/Review Example

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Love in Mary Shelleys Frankenstein

Love cannot eclipse sorrow as Victor 'is generally melancholy and despairing, and sometimes he gnashes his teeth, as if impatient of the weight of woes that oppresses him.' (Shelley 9). Ralph begins to love Victor like a brother and is in turn saddened to see him broken by misery. Ralph asks him to relate his story so that he can see if he can be of help to him. Victor thanks him for his sympathy but says that his fate 'is nearly fulfilled' (Shelley 12) and nothing can subvert his situation. Victor consents to narrate his autobiography in the hope that it will guide or console Ralph. He hopes that by sharing his experience, he might aid Ralph to subvert a similar fate of utter despair. This is not a sure way of subversion but Victor says that; 'I do not know that the relation of my disasters will be useful to you; yet, when I reflect that you are pursuing the same course, exposing yourself to the same dangers which have rendered me what I am, I imagine that you may deduce an apt moral from my tale, that may direct you if you succeed in your undertaking and console you in case of failure.' (Shelley 12). Victor has attempted to create a living form and he neglected to correspond to his family. Love should have been present to encourage him to write home but it was not there to motivate him because he was consumed by work. ...
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Summary

Love is present in several scenes in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. It is a story about a scientist named Victor Frankenstein and his tragedies stemming from his creation of a human-like creature. This essay explores the premise that in some scenes, love is not sufficient to eclipse sorrow as the suffering has been greater than what love can do to ease the pain…
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