The Old Man and the Sea

High school
Book Report/Review
Pages 2 (502 words)
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Old age ends youth, and death ends old age. Should we fear old age? That depends on how we have lived our lives. A wonderful youth behind us or not, one thing is certain, – we must accept passage of time and come to terms with oldness.


“…The old man was thin and gaunt with deep wrinkles in the back of his neck. The brown blotches… ran well down the sides of his face and his hands had the deep-creased scars… But… They were as old as erosions in a fishless desert… The boy took the old army blanket off the bed and spread it over the back of the chair and over the old man’s shoulders… his shirt had been patched so many times… The old man’s head was very old though and with his eyes closed there was no life in his face…”(Hemingway, Ernest, “The Old man and the Sea”. Nevertheless, dreaming of the lions (symbols of male strength and virility) and having a wonderful friendship with Manolin, (his fishing disciple), Santiago lives his “second youth”. Wishing Manolin were there to help him wrestle the marlin he recalls his youth. The conquer (in spite of everything), suggests his reaffirmation of his pride, identity, self-control, endurance, strength and wish to defeat weakness that comes with old age. Bringing back at least the skeleton of the huge marlin, Santiago proves still worth the epithet “the best fisherman”. His conversation with the boy about fishing again (together), and his passing the spear to the boy, show Santiago’s and Manolino’s mutual faith, hope and life-wish. Moreover, they show the contrast and the unity of the old man’s decaying and the boy’s youthful vitality.
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