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Durng the 1930's, America watched anxiously as the German dictator Adolf Hitler rose in military and political power and virtually swept across Europe overrunning Poland and France, eventually knocking at Great Britain's and Russia's doorsteps.. Most people would wonder why, being one of the world powers of the time, did America not engage Germany immediately even though Nazism, at this point, was generally detested in the United States.


During his imprisonment in 1925, Adolf Hitler came up with his theories for a political movement that placed the Aryan (German) people at the top of a hierarchy of races. This movement, later called the Nazi movement, aimed for Aryan supremacy and a central Aryan government that would eliminate "impure breeds" such as Jews and other races.
Hitler's philosophies mirror the American policies of the 1920's. During this period, America adopted an isolationist policy and had a general popular sentiment that looked down upon immigrants, Catholics, Jews and Blacks (Kennedy et al., 382).
Hitler himself admired America during this period and commended them for their immigration policies and popular sentiment that did not favor people of different races. He specifically noted the "race-based anti-immigration laws and for the subordination of the "inferior" black population." and attributes their success to their efforts at keeping themselves racially pure ("Nazi")
This view, however, did not last as he denounced the United States as "a mongrel nation half Judaised, half Negrified" following America's adoption of greater racial freedom and rights. ...
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