The Pros and Cons of the No Child Left Behind Act

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The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2002 was a major restructuring of the way we manage our public school systems. It instituted new guidelines on how we test our students and measure their success. It mandated increased accountability to schools and school districts in the areas of English proficiency, dropout rates, and redesignation rates of English language learners…

Introduction

Yet, along with the greater emphasis put on student performance has come nationwide accountability and the unethical measures that school districts have implemented to meet the new federal guidelines.
The NCLB Act was designed primarily to aid poor, minority, and immigrant students by implementing testing standards and assuring no child was falling through the cracks and being left behind. To support this effort, the bill appropriated $650 million to be used by the states to instruct English language learners. This was a 50% increase in funding for these efforts over previous years (Crawford). In an era when education funding has suffered from so many cutbacks, the additional funding was a decided benefit for schools, especially with high immigrant populations. However, the new formula used to distribute the money resulted in the least populated states, such as North Dakota and Alaska, receiving a reduction in funding. This has resulted in fewer English Learner programs for Native Americans that are enrolled in public schools in these states (Crawford).
The NCLB Act requires that all students be tested at regular intervals to measure their progress in Math and English. ...
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