The Criminal Justice System of England and Wales

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According to the World Factbook of Criminal Justice Systems, the British constitution is "a blend of statute law, precedent, and tradition dating back to the time of King Henry I." It also said that the three major statutes that define the British legal and political history were the Magna Carta (1215), the Bill of Rights (1688), and the Act of Settlement (1700).


This is because the acts of the Parliament can override common law provisions. Moreover, its membership in the European Union requires it to follow the European community law.
The World Factbook of Criminal Justice Systems also said that the legal system in England and Wales is "adversarial" in all courts, including the juvenile courts. Its criminal justice is the "historical pioneer" of the common law type of legal system.
More often than not, the law evolves through the decisions made in previous individual cases while decisions in court influence certain perceptions and rules. Such practices might have originated from the fifth century while it was after 1066 when general perceptions regarding common law principles increased.
Also, the World Factbook of Criminal Justice Systems added that England and Wales' common legal systems were derived from the Acts of Union of 1536 and 1542. Moreover, the late 19th and 20th centuries have witnessed a boost in the number and scale of statutes and of delegated legislation in British law.
Just like in most countries, crime in England and Wales is classified and distinguished mostly on the basis of its seriousness. In addition, an offense may vary according to the procedure it is brought into trial. ...
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