"moral development" of Huckleberry Finn in book Adventures of Huck Finn

High school
Pages 6 (1506 words)
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One of the major themes of the book Adventures of Huckleberry Finn written by Mark Twain is the moral development of Huck. The author brightly shows us the process of Huck's growing up, and how it is multifaceted ultimately when the boy is forced to make decisions, the choices, which transfer him from the world of childhood to the world of adults.


In comparison with the book 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" we see the other Huck, the boy who has become older. "His moral development is sharply contrasted to the character of Tom Sawyer1". Huck takes his life much more seriously than Tom does. The great difference between Huck and Tom lays in the fact that Tom continue to be a boy, who does not know any hardship in his life, whereas Huck grows up beneath our very eyes, overcomes a lot of difficulties, and gets his own experience. "The gradual development of Huck's ironic struggle to free himself form the moral hypocrisy, romantic conventions, and racial stereotypes of nineteenth-century America reveals a serious, essential satiric thematic purpose.2"
On reading the book one may observe the contention of conflicting movements in the main character's spirit. On the one hand is the habitual for the people of that time attitude towards slavery and violence, and on the other hand is an instinctive desire to bid defiance to injustice of society. The author displays this contention with a great expressiveness and psychological persuasiveness.
The first great changes happen with Huck when he realizes that his has nobody to care and to protect him. His own father, his only parent, has been constantly drinking. ...
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