Representation of Urban Culture in the Literary Works of Anzia Yezierska and Carl Sandburg

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Anzia Yezierska was born in the 1880s in the town of Plinkst on the Russian-Polish border. She was the last of seven children to Bernard and Pearl Yezierska. Her family came to America in 1890 when she was a youngster, next in the footsteps of her eldest brother Meyer, who indoors to the states six years previous.


In her fifty-year writing career, the major theme of organizing throughout her mechanism is the cost of acculturation and incorporation among refugees. Her stories offer nearby into the meaning of emancipation for refugees' mainly Jewish immigrant women. Many of her works of narrative can be branded semi autobiographical.
In her writing, she illustrates a lot on her personal life as a migrant in New York's Lower East Side. Her works, therefore, trait elements of realism with serious notice to aspect and skilful utilization of Yiddish-English dialect. At the same time, sentimentalism and extremely romanticized typescript have encouraged some detractors to label her works as romantic.
In All I Could Never Be and Red Ribbon on a White Horse, Yezierska figured out their love as an ideal amalgamation of two cultures that verifies disillusioning. This story of the Gentile tutor and suitor happened to an example that persisted throughout her works, as Yezierska inspected the alteration of imaginative migration women from greenhorns to Americans.
The achievements of Anzia Yezierska early short stories led to a succinct, but noteworthy, relationship between the novelist and Hollywood. Movie maker Samuel Goldwyn acquired the rights to Yezierska's collection Hungry Hearts. The film was shot on site at New York's Lower East Side. ...
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