Commentary on Endo Shusakus When I Whistle

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Reviewing the prologue then opens the doors towards Endo's ability to welcome readers to the story in an inelaborate and effortless way. The first part admits us to the journey of the book's protagonist, Ozu, in a bullet train, signifying that this occurred in Japan during the 1970s, considering that the book was written and published in 1974, and the first Shinkansen line as the world's first bullet train was opened to the public…

Introduction

When Ueda finally mentions a teacher that he knows will make Ozu recognize him, he touches him, a gesture considered an affirmation to reaffirm the recall of what transpired. At the mention of the teacher ('old Rat Hole'), Endo has slowly started to weave a tapestry of events by which Ozu will recall his past. Ozu's "half pleased and half pained smile" elicits questions from the readers - was he half pleased to realize he actually remembered, or that he was meeting someone from his past Was he half pained because he realizes how distant it was
Ozu's pronouncement that he does not attend any of the reunions reflects his personality as a simple man. Reunions are not a special event for him, especially with those who did not contribute much in his life and therefore weren't actually given a special place in his memory; the same does for him during reunions. He was not within the capacity nor is he the type to spend time to mingle and socialize. Of the three characters, Ozu is the most interesting. ...
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