Fatigue and Limbic Dysfunction in Parkinsons Disease

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I have additionally edited this document for reference cites that were not originally provided. The cites needed to be double checked as well because the volume numbers of journal entries were missing. The cites that I found referenced in the paper, I added to the reference page, however, many of the cites you provided, I did not find referenced to in the paper, so those were omitted.


In essence, I did the best I could with what I was provided.
Parkinson's disease (PD), first described by James Parkinson in 1817 (Figure 1), is one of the most prevalent disabling illnesses that can occur later in life. It is estimated to affect 1% of 70-year-olds, but is also seen in younger people, with 10% of cases occurring before the age of 50.
The disease has become the pathfinder for other neurodegenerative disorders, since discovery of dopamine deficiency within the basal ganglia led to the development of the first effective treatment for a progressive neurodegenerative condition. Dopamine replacement therapy substantially reduces the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in most patients, improving their quality of life and initially appearing to decrease mortality.
Patients with PD who experience such central fatigue have pathology causing reductions in dopamine and serotonin turnover within the basal ganglia and limbic circuits. These are the structures, which facilitate the link between emotion/motivation (limbic system) and motor response.
Estimates of the annual incidence of Parkinson's disease are in the range of 4-20 per 100,000 individuals. ...
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