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The EU is responsible for in excess of 20% of world trade and 31% of global output with significant impact on world affairs. Members not only derive financial advantages but also the respectability of being associated with others who believe in democracy and the rule of law (Steiner and Woods, p17).


In the current context it refers to the imbalance of power between national interests in decision-making within the Council of the European Union (Ministers) and across the EU institutions as a whole. Crucially European citizens have little say in what is done in their name once they vote for their MEPs. Mitchell (2005) clarifies this:
Europe's democratic deficit, whether it be perceived or real, is largely due to the EU's institutional architecture, which promotes a type of circulatory decision-making process, but permits little input from the European public sphere. Compounding this situation is the informal nature of negotiations that often take place among and within the key policy-making bodies of the EU, leading to a less than transparent, and sometimes unpredictable, policy-making process.
The institutions ultimately take their respective mandates from the Treaties which themselves are open to interpretation. It could be argued that the EU is not a well-defined cogent democratic entity - but a hybrid of functionalism, inter-governmentalism and mult-level governance (Steiner and Woods, 2003. p13). Indeed, quoting Dr Guiliano Amato, Aveblj (2005) points out that the EU's stakeholders have yet to determine what the European Union ought to be - and therefore cannot begin to address the wider question of how to get there.
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