An essay on Dracula

High school
Pages 6 (1506 words)
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The Victorian era is ably represented in Bram Stoker's Dracula as consisting mostly of the middle and upper class. This is the image of the morally upright period most often presented in literature and film that deals with London of the time, but Stoker's prose also indicates the existence of the very real dark foundation upon which the industrial revolution was constructed.


The members of these classes were at best reflections of the thin line that existed between the middle class and a slight shift in birthright or inheritance. The social distinctions of the British class system are on full display in Dracula, though with a unique twist courtesy of the foreign invader who may sleep in dirt, but is nonetheless an exemplar of the noble blood. Dracula's persistent pursuit of his victims at the cost of his own life may be viewed best in strictly Marxist terms that illustrate the process by which the upper class sucks the blood out of the lower class in order to survive, while missing the paradox that they are ensuring themselves as the ultimate victim.
The method by which the middle class English and American men in the novel respond to reality of the existence of vampires is a symbolic iteration of the Marxian concept of false consciousness. Content in the assurance that they were collectively a force for good even if individually they were capable of little more than meaningless flights of self-centered egoism, Van Helsing and his gang view themselves as the means by to improve the lot of those unfortunate enough to be born beneath their own stations, while at the same time ensuring the division of class continues to exist. ...
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