College
Case Study
Miscellaneous
Pages 7 (1757 words)
Download 0
This paper analyzes a critical court decision. The paper starts with a brief description of the case and follows it with an analysis. This analysis then ties up with a popular sociological theory. The theory is further explained with the help of an example…

Introduction

However, a warning has to be made on the public speaking system to ensure that no people are present when the sluice gates are opened and the water rushes in a torrent. On the afternoon of June 23, 2002, this did not happen when the sluice gates were opened. As a result two people drowned and seven were bodily injured.
The case came to trial in the Ontario Court of Justice in January 200. The two accused personnel, John Tammage and Robert Bednarek were accused of 'criminal negligence.' The trial was a lengthy one and took 75 days getting over in December 2006. Both the accused, John Tammage who was a part of the management team and an electrical engineer and, Robert Bednarek who worked in the electrical department as an operator, were acquitted of the negligence charges. The court ruled that the defendants did not have any motive and their actions were devoid of any criminal intent.
0.1 Analysis: The judgment ruled in favor of the big company and expectedly did not relieve the common people. This ties in with the differential social organization theory of Sutherland in 1938. The theory states that crime is backed by some organizations. In other words, it claims that crime is inherent in certain big firms. The higher authorities or government choose to ignore it or support it. Either way, crime benefits by garnering more support and voice. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Sociology of Developing Countries
There was an economy relative to the region, where class structure and a system of racial difference which caused the South to become unique to the rest of the nation. Historians such as James Henrietta have said that Sociology was the cause of all evil within the Developing countries South. Developing countries Sociology defined by Max Weber is "a greed forgone", and "acquisition by force,…
Sociology
In basic words, social class is based on economically determined relationship to the market (owner, employee etc.) Status is based on non-economical qualities like honor, prestige and religion. Party refers to factors having to do with affiliations in the political domain.…
Applying Sociology to Public Practice
Sociology is defined as the 'scientific' study of the relationship between human social organization and human behavioural processes. Its early proponents and even sociologists today believe that they can develop a scientific way of studying mankind and his social nature in the same way as natural scientists have formulated a scientific approach to explain the physical world. Fundamental to the…
What are the differences between common sense and sociology and what makes sociology so unique?
Sociology states the obvious! Sociology is only commonsense! These statements are often heard in criticism of sociology. Commonsense however, is based on assumption and is the knowledge and/or awareness shared by most people within a particular group; Sociology, unlike other social sciences, is unique in that it does not take the world at 'face value' but provides theorized and tested insights…
Law Sociology
However, a warning has to be made on the public speaking system to ensure that no people are present when the sluice gates are opened and the water rushes in a torrent. On the afternoon of June 23, 2002, this did not happen when the sluice gates were opened. As a result two people drowned and seven were bodily injured.…
Sociology,
2. Gozdziak, E.M., (2004) Training Refugee Mental Health Providers: Ethnography as a bridge to multicultural practice- Human Organization. Journal of the society for applied anthropology, vol. 63 (2) 203-210. 2004.…
Sociology of Law and Punishment
Norbert Elias suggests that civilisation transform human habitus so that violence in all forms is gradually subjected to greater and more sophisticated forms of management and control. 'Decivilisation' according to him, encompasses processes which produce an increase in violence and a breakdown in the stability and consistency of social relations. What remains unexplored is the extent to which…