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Gold Rush Different Racial Groups - Essay Example

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High school
Essay
Miscellaneous
Pages 2 (502 words)

Summary

For the white man heading west to California during the Gold Rush, movement was not directed solely by dreams of quick wealth, but also as part of a larger ideal of Manifest Destiny, the concept that the whole of the American continent was given to the white man by his god for the purpose of using and civilizing the land according to certain cultural customs…

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Gold Rush Different Racial Groups

Without much thought or effort on their part, Anglo men established their dominance over California by systematically asserting themselves over others.
Of course, the major motivation of those in California at this time was the desire to strike it rich. Although some people did just this, there was only a finite amount of wealth to be uncovered, leaving most men few options for increasing their status. Racism, codifying the differences between themselves and others, was one way to raise perceived power in a landscape where men were often at odds with, and at the mercy of, an environment over which they had very little control. Roaring Camp: The Social World of the California Gold Rush by Susan Lee Johnson, demonstrates how life was different for white men, and how they acted to maintain their superiority in California.
Theirs was a world where status had already been shaken up. Due to the scarcity of white women and the need for some means of support, many men found themselves employed in positions that back east would only have gone to girls. ...
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