Forensic Dentistry: Helpful Solution

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What do you do when a forensic case comes up to you and you have absolutely no where to begin with Do you hand it over to some one who can identify it Or you just try to guess around with the possibilities.
If you're a dentist then have no fear, the teeth are here.


Usually the mandible delivers more force than the maxilla, and therefore the stronger impression is of the lower teeth on the skin. The timing in recording these evidences is small, as bite marks alter with time on the skin depending upon the individual. It is in addressing this problem that the ABFO recommends frequent photographs of the bites at periodic intervals. (Forensic Odontology, 2006)
The identification of individuals was seriously appreciated when the results of a study conducted on five identical twins took place in 1982. The study demonstrated that even identical twins have difference in their dental morphologies. (Bowers, 2000)
It is in the same context that we have come to identify the individuality of the dental bite marks. It is a general consensus that bite marks are quite individual for every human, and chances of same bite marks be found from another human are rare. (Bowers, 2000)
Pretty and Sweet (2001) very sweetly describe forensic dentistry as "the overlap between the dental and the legal profession." A complete statement in itself. Forensic dentistry has proved itself as an integral part of the forensic health studies, where it has been accurate in identifying different cases where other evidences were scarce. (Pretty & Sweet, 2001) Another name that has been given to it is "bite mark evidence expertise". The process is simple. ...
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