Satyagraha in a Secular World

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To build on the idea of a secular society accepting Satyagraha as a way of life, or belief, one must first understand its origin and the Hindu religion that it is derived from. Hinduism is a way of life that may have many gods, beliefs or different sets of ethics.


In comparing this set of beliefs with Christianity, we find that they do not have much in common. Christianity has one God and no meditation practices or physical exercises to support our mind or brain functionality. Christianity's only bold set of ethics would be the Ten Commandments. Christians believe in the Soul outlives the body in Heaven (or perhaps in Hell), but have no belief in rebirth of the soul into a new body as Hindus do.
As well as the origin of Satyagraha we must also understand its meaning. Directly translated, Satyagraha means "Insistence on truth, and the force derivable from such insistence."(Dilks, Hansen, and Parfitt) Gandhi created Satyagraha to develop a nonviolent resistance to help India (or any country or person) peacefully enforce their will upon their opponent, which at the time was Britain and their colonial rule over India. Gandhi insisted on self-suffering for Satyagraha to work. He calls this "Truth-Force", which basically means that to enforce something upon someone it is more effective to do so through self-suffering, rather than through the suffering of the opponent. Satyagraha believes that there is some truth in everything, even our enemies, and it takes all of the individual portions of truth to make up the total truth. ...
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