The Effects of Psychoactive Substance Abuse on Young People

College
Essay
Miscellaneous
Pages 2 (502 words)
Download 0
In many societies, drug and alcohol consumption among adults, especially males, is socially acceptable. Over the past four decades, however, and more notably since the "hippie" period when post-war babies began growing into adulthood and drug laws were relaxed (WHO 2006), psychoactive substance abuse has become increasingly prevalent in the youth, with dire mental, physical and social consequences…

Introduction


Drug and alcohol abuse have adverse effects on the mental health of young people, impacting on their ability to learn and to progress normally in the education system. Cannabis, for example, impairs cognitive development, in particular associative processes and recall, and affects the intoxicated student's ability to concentrate (WHO 2006), while cocaine consumption results in a range of cerebral complications, ranging from hallucination to paranoia (Wikipedia 2006). Many studies reveal a correlation between drug/alcohol abuse and poor grades, as well as with other behavior that inhibit learning, making substance abuse one of the top problems in youth education today.
Psychoactive substance abuse also has a negative impact on the body. Both cannabis and alcohol impair psychomotor performance and visual perception, resulting in many fatal motor vehicle accidents, as well as complications such as seizures, and lung, kidney and brain damage (WHO 2006). ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Substance abuse term
It is not clear why some people develop alcohol use problems and others do not, although there is a strong genetic link. Initially, alcohol is often used to soothe pain or hide insecurities. Over time, abuse and dependence can develop. Many people often fail to understand the difference between alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence. Alcohol abuse occurs when you repeatedly drink alcohol even though…
Substance Absue Relapse Amung Women
Relapse is a situation of 'converting back' from a condition after a short or long abstinences. In drug addiction and substance abuse, it can be defined as "the resumption of the use of drugs after leaving it for some time" (Harris, J., Anderson, J. and Sharon, W, 1998). For substance abuse relapse among women, the issue of resumption of females to substance abuse after they have recovered.…
Substance Abuse Treatment
Many of the counselors at GCASA revealed that they actually prefer to work with mandated clients because, even if they initially resent having to come to treatment, they eventually are more motivated to continue with treatment and get something positive from it. Dr. John Kelly, the lead investigator on the study mentioned above is quoted as saying, "Once in a therapeutic environment, mandated…
Methamphetamine Abuse
It is also a belief that chronic abuse of the drug would eventually lead to profound reduction in the gray matter of the brain. There are many associated health risks reported with methamphetamine abuse, some of which are risky sexual behavior, social and family problems, and drug induced psychosis (Murray, 1998).…
Psychotherapy and Substance Abuse
Substance abuse, including tobacco use and nicotine addiction, is associated with a wide range of serious health and social problems. Recent epidemiological evidence demonstrates that 72 conditions requiring inpatient treatment are wholly or partially attributable to substance abuse. Consequently, the estimated annual cost for health care, law enforcement, motor vehicle crashes, crime, and lost…
The Effects of Psychoactive Substance Abuse on Young People
Drug and alcohol abuse have adverse effects on the mental health of young people, impacting on their ability to learn and to progress normally in the education system. Cannabis, for example, impairs cognitive development, in particular associative processes and recall, and affects the intoxicated student's ability to concentrate (WHO 2006), while cocaine consumption results in a range of cerebral…
Substance Abuse
The reach of substance abuse also extends to schools, communities, health and welfare agencies, the justice systems and to society at large. We all shoulder the costs (Beverly Conyers, 2003). Children of substance abusers suffer the most, from direct effects on their physical and mental health to influences on their own use of tobacco, alcohol or drugs. The family's role in the development and…