Research Design to Determine the Future of New Orleans Levee Board

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Two main types of levee protection systems were in general use prior to Katrina's landfall, one being older earthen levees, modernized and raised with the addition of concrete capwalls, commonly referred to as an I-wall, and typically in service around downtown New Orleans and the Industrial Canal area, and the other being earthen levees in use around the remaining three sides of east Orleans and St.


Generally, the failed sections of earthen levee around St. Bernard and east Orleans Parishes do not appear to have included sheetpiling or other core construction. In a very few instances, evidence of a sheetpile core is now exposed and in general, these occurrences tend to be present where older pre-existing canals and natural waterways cut across the levee's intended location, probably due to recognition that otherwise seepage and percolation would be more of a problem at these locations.
As a result of its elevation near sea level, the Lake Pontchartrain Basin is quite vulnerable to tropical storms and hurricanes. Hurricanes are categorized by their windspeed in miles per hour (mph). Hurricanes have affected the Louisiana coastline with a frequency that peaks in September. Hurricanes with significant monetary or human loss are memorialized by retiring their name.
In addition to its separation from the coast, the topography of the land in the city of New Orleans is adverse. The city is surrounded by a river levee system 25 feet high along its southern boundary, and by hurricane protection levees about 15 feet high along the remaining boundaries. ...
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