Thoreaus Masculinity

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In David Henry Thoreau's texts emerges a distinctly American masculinity in which the ideal man should embody the following ideals: self sufficiency, virtue, and oneness with nature. These three main characteristics can be seen promoted in multiple ways throughout his texts, which he very intuitively uses universal observations to sway readers to his point of view.


He also served as an abolitionist against slavery for his entire life by lecturing across the country against the Fugitive Slave Law. Every man's search for wisdom can be connected to Thoreau's simple search for truth, in which he praises these three main characteristics as the most admirable qualities of the American man.
Thoreau's theoretical energy was inspired by the wild. He found it necessary to live free in the wilderness provided by Walden Pond for two years and two months , in order to find the clarity he needed to search for truth. He followed the notion set by Plato, that wisdom is attained through the continuous pursuit of truth. This was a concept originated by Plato's mentor Socrates through his ideals of continuous self analysis. All, of which, is presumed will lead one to the most meaningful life. In his piece, Natural History of Massachusetts he says, You cannot go into any field or wood, but it will seem as if every stone had been turned, and the bark on every tree ripped up. But, after all, it is much easier to discover than to see when the cover is off. It has been well said that "the attitude of inspection is prone." Wisdom does not inspect, but behold Thoreau, pp. 130-131). Here as Thoreau teaches patience through the appreciation of nature. ...
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