The Devil Wears Prada

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The fast-flashing series of frames showing the fashion editor/guru Melinda Priestly (Meryl Streep) striding into the anteroom of her Office and dumping hat, coat and bag on the desk of her harassed and obviously overworked assistant while barking off the latest commands for the day paints a clear picture of what servant-leadership is not - and how the concept is seemingly incongruous in the high-flying fashion industry - in the recently-released motion picture "The Devil Wears Prada".


Andrea is the "second assistant", the "first assistant" underscores to her, and that virtually makes her the "slave of a slave". Everyone in the organization and in that milieu tells her that, and yet in the same breath intimates that it is a job that every girl would die for.
As the start, Andrea sees the job as merely her entry point into the more real world of journalism, and she hopes the training she would receive under her Dragon Lady of a boss would give her the qualifications and credentials for more serious work. Gradually though, she is fascinated by the glitter and glamour of the world that she has entered and finds herself struggling not only to survive but to conquer, using the very tools of the trade, so to speak, necessary to get ahead. She is, in fact, obviously also fascinated by the persona and aura projected by her boss, Melinda, a sleek, soft-spoken lady who inspires and commands respect and fear because she wields such power and influence within the industry. It likewise soon becomes obvious that while before, Andrea's goal is merely to please Melinda and thus secure her job, she eventually begins to fit into the mold of her boss. ...
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