Interaction of Novel ibogaine Analogs with the Human 34 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

Ph.D.
Dissertation
Miscellaneous
Pages 49 (12299 words)
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Substance use and dependence cause a significant burden to individuals and societies throughout the world. The World Health Report 2002 indicated that 8.9% of the total burden of disease comes from the use of psychoactive substances (World Health Organization, 2004)…

Introduction

Over the past decade, use of addictive substances has infiltrated its way into the mainstream culture in certain countries. Younger people in particular seem to possess a skewed sense of safety about these substances, believing rather erroneously that they are safe and benign. Meanwhile, addictive substances are posing a serious threat to the health, social and economic fabric of families, communities, and countries. For many countries, the economic burden is relatively new, but growing quickly and unlikely to go away easily (Regidor, 2006).
It is estimated that at least 20% of the American population suffers from some form of addiction. The total cost of addictive behaviors in terms of family disintegration, loss of labor productivity, illness, injury, and death reaches the staggering sum of $300 billions per year, making it one of the most serious socioeconomic problems facing society. Thus, prevention and treatment of drug addiction has been an important issue in the USA as well as worldwide for decades.
While the individual patient, rather than his or her disease, is the appropriate focus of treatment for substance abuse, an understanding of the neurobiology of dependence and addiction can clarify the rationales for treatment methods and goals. ...
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