Canterbury Tales and Chaucer

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Book Report/Review
Miscellaneous
Pages 5 (1255 words)
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The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer is a collection of closely knit tales which are connected by their major themes and relationship among the tales and the characters. In the Canterbury Tales, the poet incorporates original tales as well as stories from medieval literature and a careful reader notices the relationship among the various themes of the tales…

Introduction

Generally, the Prologue acts as the introduction to the different characters and their tales. However, it is obvious that the Prologue has a more important function of introducing the major themes of the work which are present in the various tales of the work. In other words, the poet introduces not only the major characters and tales in the Prologue, but also the various themes of the entire work which can be identified in the different tales. Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales which comprises of two dozen stories displays remarkable diversity in genre, source materials, characters and themes. Such a diversity in the major themes of the work also contribute to the overall success of the work and most important themes that are present in the different tales in the Canterbury Tales are courtly love, treachery, and greed. There is essential connection among the major themes of the 'Franklin's Tale', the 'Wife of Bath's Tale' and the Prologue. A reflective analysis of the given passage from the 'Franklin's Tale' is most useful in comprehending this fundamental relationship among the various tales and the Canterbury Tales as a whole. ...
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